Corsage

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This article is about the flower bouquet. For the article of clothing on which the flower was originally worn, see Corsage (bodice).
Prom wrist corsages
Consideration is often given to selecting similar colors for the corsage as in the outfit.

A corsage /kɔrˈsɑːʒ/ is a small bouquet of flowers worn on a woman's dress or worn around her wrist to a formal occasion, traditionally purchased by the woman's date. Corsages are now most commonly seen at prom or similar events.

Originally named after the French word for the bodice of a dress to which it was attached, they were originally thought to be lucky or ward off evil spirits [1] It has become a customary practice and a demonstration of affection from a date. It is thought that originally the gentleman would bring a gift of flowers for the parents of his date, and would select one flower to give to his date which would then be carried or attached to her clothing.[1]

  • In some countries, corsages are worn by the mothers and grandmothers of the bride and groom at a wedding ceremony.[2]
  • The flower(s) is(are) worn on a young woman's clothing or wrist for the homecoming celebration or other formal occasions such as prom in some schools around the world.

Sometimes incorrectly called corsages, flowers worn by men are traditionally known as buttonholes or boutonnieres.

Prom[edit]

When attending a School Formal or Prom, providing a corsage for a prom date signifies consideration and generosity in most countries throughout the world.[citation needed] Corsages are usually worn around a prom date's wrist. Alternately, a modified nosegay that a prom date can carry in her hand or a pin-on type corsage. The colors of the flowers are usually designed to complement a prom date's dress. Prom couples may be able to go together to choose the flowers for a custom-made corsage or boutonniere.[3]

There is some regional variation in the size and design of corsages, for example with large Texas homecoming "mums" with trailing ribbons.[4]

Recent changes allowing greater expression of homosexual relationships create interesting challenges about whether a corsage or boutonniere should be purchased for the other partner. The safest option is to provide both pin and ribbon to allow it to be affixed to a buttonhole, dress top or wrist according to the preference of the wearer.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "The history of prom corsages - Dressing The Part | Prom and Graduation Special Section". Theneighbornewspapers.com. Retrieved 2014-05-28. 
  2. ^ Wedding Glossary Terms Retrieved on 2009-04-29
  3. ^ "Prom Tips for Guys | Prom Costs | Prom Tux | Prom Limo". Prom-night.com. Retrieved 2014-05-28. 
  4. ^ 12/06/12 4:50pm 12/06/12 4:50pm. "Inside The Weird Texas Tradition of Enormous Homecoming Corsages". Jezebel.com. Retrieved 2014-05-28. 
  5. ^ "Should I get my lesbian prom date a corsage?". Answers.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2014-05-28.