Cottesmore School

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Cottesmore School
Cottesmore school - geograph.org.uk - 1564715.jpg
Established 1894[1]
Type Other Independent School
Headmaster Thomas Rogerson
Location Buchan Hill
Pease Pottage

Crawley
West Sussex
RH11 9AU
 England Coordinates: 51°05′15″N 0°12′58″W / 51.08758°N 0.21605°W / 51.08758; -0.21605
Local authority West Sussex
DfE URN 126106
Students 160
Gender Coeducational
Ages 7–13
Website www.cottesmoreschool.com

Cottesmore is a preparatory school in the United Kingdom, which has been preparing children for public schools since 1894. It is predominantly a full boarding school although there are a limited number of places for both weekly and day boarders. There are 150 boys and girls from the ages of 7 to 13.

Cottesmore is situated in 35 acres (140,000 m2) of its own grounds, the setting for its playing fields, cricket pitches, all-weather cricket nets, grass and hard tennis courts, golf course, lake and gardens.

History[edit]

Cottesmore was founded in 1894 in Hove, Sussex. The new buildings for the preparatory school were officially opened on 19 June 1897.[2] The school moved to its present site at Buchan Hill after World War II in 1946. The school is housed in a fine, Grade II-listed[3] Victorian mansion known as Buchan Hill that was built for an ostrich-farming millionaire named P Saillard in 1882-3.[4][5] The building is a large Elizabethan-style house, designed by the architects Eshart George and Harold Peto.[6] Buchan Hill was originally purchased in the early 19th century by Hon. Thomas Erskine (Lord Chancellor 1806-1807), son of the Earl of Buchan.

Awards[edit]

The school was the winner of the Best School Food Award Tatler Schools Awards in 2009.[7]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Margaret Smallwood (2008), Cottesmore School, Independent Schools Inspectorate 
  2. ^ The Morning Post (London, England), Monday, March 29, 1897; pg. 5; Issue 38941. 19th Century British Library Newspapers: Part II.
  3. ^ English Heritage listing
  4. ^ Mark Girouard (1971), The Victorian Country House, Clarendon Press, p. 8 
  5. ^ Jill Franklin (1981), The Gentleman's Country House and its Plan, 1835-1914, Routledge & Kegan Paul, p. 257 
  6. ^ Main building to Cottesmore School. Listing on English Heritage's Images of England website
  7. ^ End of school dinners. The Evening Standard, (London, England), Tuesday, September 15, 2009
  8. ^ a b c d e f Cottesmore School, Educated School Guide 
  9. ^ The Almost Late Gordon Chater, Bantam Books, 1996, ISBN 9781863597975 
  10. ^ The Encyclopedia Britannica 20, 1929 

External links[edit]