Cottle County, Texas

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Cottle County, Texas
Cottle County Texas.jpg
Cottle County Courthouse in Paducah
Map of Texas highlighting Cottle County
Location in the state of Texas
Map of the United States highlighting Texas
Texas's location in the U.S.
Founded 1892
Named for George Washington Cottle
Seat Paducah
Largest town Paducah
Area
 • Total 902 sq mi (2,336 km2)
 • Land 901 sq mi (2,334 km2)
 • Water 1.1 sq mi (3 km2), 0.1%
Population
 • (2010) 1,505
 • Density 3/sq mi (1/km²)
Congressional district 13th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.co.cottle.tx.us

Cottle County is a county in the U.S. state of Texas. As of the 2010 census, its population was 1,505.[1] Its county seat is Paducah.[2] The county was founded in 1892 and is named for George Washington Cottle,[3] who died defending the Alamo. Cottle County was formerly one of 46 prohibition, or entirely dry counties in the state of Texas. It now allows beer and wine sales.

The Matador Ranch, based in Motley once reached into Cottle County.[4]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 902 square miles (2,340 km2), of which 901 square miles (2,330 km2) is land and 1.1 square miles (2.8 km2) (0.1%) is water.[5]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 24
1890 240 900.0%
1900 1,002 317.5%
1910 4,396 338.7%
1920 6,901 57.0%
1930 9,395 36.1%
1940 7,079 −24.7%
1950 6,099 −13.8%
1960 4,207 −31.0%
1970 3,204 −23.8%
1980 2,947 −8.0%
1990 2,247 −23.8%
2000 1,904 −15.3%
2010 1,505 −21.0%
Est. 2012 1,486 −1.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
2012 Estimate[1]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 1,904 people, 820 households, and 550 families residing in the county. The population density was 2 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 1,088 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 81.46% White, 9.87% Black or African American, 7.20% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. 18.91% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 820 households out of which 28.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.90% were married couples living together, 10.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.90% were non-families. 32.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.84.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.90% under the age of 18, 5.70% from 18 to 24, 21.50% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 25.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 87.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,446, and the median income for a family was $33,036. Males had a median income of $24,375 versus $16,667 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,212. About 13.70% of families and 18.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.40% of those under age 18 and 16.00% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

Until 2000, the county had gone consistently Democratic in presidential elections. After John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson and Hubert Humphrey easily carried the county in 1960, 1964 and 1968 respectively,[8][9][10] Cottle County again voted for the Democratic candidate in the 1972 Election, as it was the only county in Texas north of Maverick County (Eagle Pass) to have been won by George McGovern.[11] After Jimmy Carter carried it in 1976 and 1980,[12][13] Walter Mondale won a majority of the county's votes in 1984[14] , Michael Dukakis won the county in 1988[15] and Bill Clinton carried it in 1992 and 1996.[16][17][18]

Communities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 93. 
  4. ^ "Matador Ranch," Historical marker, Texas Historical Commission, Motley County, Texas
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved December 9, 2013. 
  7. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  8. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1960&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  9. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1964&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  10. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1968&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  11. ^ David Leip Presidential Atlas
  12. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1976&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  13. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1980&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  14. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1984&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  15. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1988&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  16. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1992&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  17. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=1996&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0
  18. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/datagraph.php?year=2012&fips=48&f=1&off=0&elect=0

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°05′N 100°16′W / 34.08°N 100.27°W / 34.08; -100.27