Council of Rimini

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The Council of Rimini (also called the Council of Ariminum) was an early Christian church synod held in Ariminum (modern Rimini, Italy).

In 358, the Roman Emperor Constantius II requested two councils, one of the western bishops at Ariminum and one of the eastern bishops (planned for Nicomedia but actually held at Seleucia Isauria) to resolve the Arian controversy over the nature of the divinity of Jesus Christ, which divided the 4th-century church.[1]

In July 359, the western council (of about 300[2] or over 400 bishops) met. Ursacius of Singidunum and Valens of Mursa soon proposed a new creed, drafted at the Council of Sirmium of 359 but not presented there, holding that the Son was like the Father "according to the scriptures," and avoiding the controversial terms "same substance" and "similar substance."[3] Others favored the creed of Nicaea.[4]

The opponents of Sirmium wrote a letter to the emperor Constantius, praising Nicaea and condemning any reconsideration of it, before many of them left the council. The supporters of Sirmium then issued the new creed and sent it through Italy.[5]

The council was considered a defeat for trinitarianism, and Saint Jerome wrote: "The whole world groaned, and was astonished to find itself Arian."[6]

Pope Liberius of Rome rejected the new creed, prompting Phaebadius of Agen and Servatus of Tongeren to withdraw their support from the homoian.[1][citation needed] The supporters of Sirmium deposed Liberius and reappointed Felix of Rome in his place.[7]

Two councils at Nike (southeast of Adrianople) and Constantinople followed.[8]

Those favoring the Creed drafted at Sirmium included:

Those favoring the Creed of Nicaea included:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Philostorgius, in Photius, Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius, book 4, chapter 10.
  2. ^ Philostorgius, in Photius, Epitome of the Ecclesiastical History of Philostorgius, book 4, chapter 10.
  3. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  4. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  5. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  6. ^ Jerome, Dialogue Against the Luciferians, 19.
  7. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  8. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  9. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  10. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  11. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  12. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  13. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.
  14. ^ Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, book 2, chapter 37.

Source and external links[edit]