Puerto Rico Council of Secretaries

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Puerto Rico Council of Secretaries
Council overview
Formed July 25, 1952; 62 years ago (1952-07-25)
Council executive Ingrid Vila Biaggi, Chief of Staff
Key documents Article IV of the Constitution of Puerto Rico,
some reorganization plans, and
several acts which created other executive departments not established by the Constitution

The Council of Secretaries of Puerto Rico (Spanish: Consejo de Secretarios) is the group composed by the heads of the executive departments of the government of Puerto Rico. The Council is charged with leading the different sectors of public administration within the government and does not constitute an agency by itself.

The Council, together with the Cabinet-level officers, compose the Cabinet of Puerto Rico.

Background[edit]

The establishment of the Council is proclaimed by Article IV of the Constitution of Puerto Rico which establishes that the Governor shall be assisted by Secretaries whom shall collectively constitute the Governor's advisory council and be designated as the Council of Secretaries.[1]

Each Secretary is nominated by the Governor and then presented to the Senate for advice and consent by a simple majority—except for the Secretary of State who requires the advice and consent of both the Senate and the House of Representatives.[1] If the Secretaries are confirmed they are sworn in and begin their duties immediately afterwards. However, Secretaries appointed during a legislative recess may begin serving immediately under a recess appointment until the end of the following regular session of the Legislative Assembly, or rejected by the Senate, whichever occurs first, should they not be confirmed.

The Constitution of Puerto Rico established eight Secretaries, namely: the Secretary of Agriculture and Commerce, Education, Health, Justice, Labor, Public Works, State, and Treasury.[2]

The Secretary of Agriculture and Commerce evolved into two different posts: the Secretary of Agriculture[3] and the Secretary of Economic Development and Commerce,[4] while the Secretary of Labor evolved into the Secretary of Labor and Human Resources,[5] and the Secretary of Public Works into the Secretary of Transportation and Public Works.[6]

The creation of more executive departments by Puerto Rican law established more Secretaries, namely: the Secretary of Consumer Affairs,[7] Corrections and Rehabilitation,[8] Family Affairs,[9] Housing,[10] Natural and Environmental Resources,[11] and Sports and Recreation.[12]

Current posts[edit]

Post Department Current officer Order of succession
Secretary of Agriculture Department of Agriculture Myrna Comas Pagán N/A
Secretary of Consumer Affairs Department of Consumer Affairs to be nominated N/A
Secretary of Corrections and Rehabilitation Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to be nominated N/A
Secretary of Economic Development and Commerce Department of Economic Development and Commerce Alberto Bacó Bagué 7
Secretary of Education Department of Education Rafael Román Meléndez 4
Secretary of Family Affairs Department of Family Affairs Idalia Colón Rondón N/A
Secretary of Health Department of Health Francisco Joglar Pesquera 8
Secretary of Housing Department of Housing Rubén Ríos Pagán N/A
Secretary of Justice Department of Justice Luis Sánchez Betances 2
Secretary of Labor and Human Resources Department of Labor and Human Resources Vance Thomas 5
Secretary of Natural and Environmental Resources Department of Natural and Environmental Resources Carmen Guerrero Pérez N/A
Secretary of Sports and Recreation Department of Sports and Recreation Ramón Orta N/A
Secretary of State Department of State David Bernier 1
Secretary of Transportation and Public Works Department of Transportation and Public Works Miguel Torres Díaz 6
Secretary of Treasury Department of Treasury Melba Acosta Febo 3

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Article IV, Section 5, Constitution of Puerto Rico (July 25, 1952). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  2. ^ Article IV, Section 6, Constitution of Puerto Rico (July 25, 1952). Retrieved on December 28, 2012.
  3. ^ Department of Agriculture Act, Act No. 60 of 1940 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  4. ^ Reorganization Plan No. 4 of 1994 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  5. ^ Act No. 100 of 1977 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  6. ^ Reorganization Plan No. 6 of 1971 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  7. ^ Department of Consumer Affairs Organic Law, Act No. 5 of 1973 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  8. ^ Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1993 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  9. ^ Department of Family Affairs Organic Law, Act No. 171 of 1968 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  10. ^ Department of Housing Organic Law, Act No. 10 of 1972 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  11. ^ Department of Natural and Environmental Resources Organic Law, Act No. 23 of 1972 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.
  12. ^ Department of Sports and Recreation Organic Law, Act No. 8 of 2004 (in Spanish). Retrieved on December 29, 2012.