List of county routes in Suffolk County, New York (1–25)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Old Suffolk CR13A signage.jpg
Former standard route marker for county routes in Suffolk County; CR 13A shield on CR 50 in Bay Shore.
Highway names
Interstates: Interstate X (I-X)
US Routes: U.S. Route X (US X)
State: New York State Route X (NY X)
County: County Route X (CR X)
System links

County routes in Suffolk County, New York, are maintained by the Suffolk County Department of Public Works and signed with the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices-standard yellow-on-blue pentagon route marker. The designations do not follow any fixed pattern. Routes 1 to 25 are listed below.

County Route 1[edit]

County Route 1
Location: AmityvilleEast Farmingdale
Length: 2.90 mi[1] (4.67 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 1 is known as County Line Road and extends for 2.90 miles (4.67 km) through the town of Babylon. It begins at NY 27A (Montauk Highway) in Amityville and heads north to the lower-left ramps of the interchange with NY 110 and Southern State Parkway in East Farmingdale. Parts of the road enter Nassau County; however, the Nassau County sections are not part of CR 1. A locally-maintained segment of County Line Road exists on the north side of Southern State Parkway, but it is little more than a spur leading from Main Street on the Farmingdale–East Farmingdale border.

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Amityville 0.00 0.00 NY 27A (Montauk Highway) Southern terminus
CR 12 east (Old Sunrise Highway) / NY 900D west Eastern terminus of NY 900D, western terminus of CR 12
NY 27 (Sunrise Highway) At-grade intersection
East Farmingdale Southern State Parkway west / NY 110 south Northern terminus; southbound access from Southern Parkway exit 32S
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 2[edit]

County Route 2
Location: AmityvilleHalf Hollow Hills
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 2 is mostly known as Straight Path and extends from the town of Babylon to the town of Huntington. It begins at an intersection with NY 110 in Amityville and heads east along Dixon Avenue to CR 47 in Copiague. From there it begins to move to the northeast until it eventually becomes Straight Path before the intersection with NY 27 in North Lindenhurst. The road widens into a four-lane divided highway ahead of its junction with CR 3 (Wellwood Avenue). This intersection contains turning ramps on all corners except the southwest corner, where Heathcoat Road ends. The divider ends at Sherebrook Road and the North Lindenhurst Fire Department, where the road returns to a four-lane undivided highway.

The road intersects an at-grade crossing with the Central Branch of the Long Island Rail Road. From there the road crosses NY 109 and meets the Southern State Parkway. As CR 2 approaches the interchange with the parkway, the road becomes narrower despite remaining four lanes wide. On the northwest corner of this interchange is the beginning of St. Johns Catholic Cemetery, where the road widens to accommodate a center left-turn lane. The northern border of the cemetery is along Edison Avenue, located near the intersection with CR 95 in Wyandanch.

CR 2 narrows to two lanes with stretches occasionally featuring medians. North of Commonwealth Drive, the road become four lanes with no left-turn lane until it approaches the vicinity of Wyandanch Station. Past Winter Avenue, CR 2 narrows back down to two lanes, but with a center left-turn lane. The road continues in this manner until it reaches its terminus at an intersection with NY 231 in Half Hollow Hills.

CR 2 was assigned on January 27, 1930, to the portion of its alignment between Albany Avenue in Amityville and modern NY 231 in Huntington. It was extended west along Dixon Avenue to NY 110 on February 5, 1943, replacing CR 2A. An extension beyond NY 231 was proposed during the 1960s and 1970s and officially added to CR 2's alignment on June 22, 1961. The terminus was to be at the Long Island Motor Parkway;[1] however, this extension was never built. The intersection between CR 2 and NY 27 was once intended to be upgraded into an interchange.[citation needed]

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Amityville NY 110 Southern terminus
Copiague CR 47 (Great Neck Road)
North Lindenhurst NY 27 (Sunrise Highway) At-grade intersection
CR 3
NY 109
West Babylon Southern State Parkway – New York, East Islip Exit 36 on Southern Parkway
Wyandanch CR 95
Half Hollow Hills NY 231 Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi


County Route 2A[edit]

County Route 2A
Location: AmityvilleNorth Lindenhurst

County Route 2A was a former suffixed extension of CR 2 assigned to Dixon Avenue between NY 110 and NY 27 from the 1930s to February 5, 1943[1][2]


County Route 3[edit]

County Route 3
Location: LindenhurstMelville

County Route 3 is a north-south road that includes Wellwood Avenue and Pinelawn Road. It runs mostly parallel to NY 110 until it crosses over the Long Island Expressway, where it moves to the northwest to use NY 110 as its northern terminus.

Route description

Wellwood Avenue begins as a Lindenhurst Village street at the mouth of Neguntetauge Creek on South Oyster Bay, and heads north towards NY 27A, where it becomes a two-lane divided highway. CR 3 begins along Wellwood Avenue north of NY 27A as that two-lane divided highway, and the divider quickly ends. Along the way the road passes Lindenhurst Village Hall and Memorial Library, and the Old Village Hall Museum.

The first major intersection is with CR 12 (Hoffman Avenue) west of Lindenhurst, although after CR 3 passes under the Babylon Branch, it intersects a Village Street named Hoffman Avenue.

After leaving the Village of Lindenhurst, CR 3 encounters a cloverleaf interchange with NY 27, where the road briefly becomes a four-lane divided highway. until the intersection of Spieglehagen Street and becomes a four-lane undivided highway. The road divides again at CR 2 (Straight Path), and includes a northwest to northeast turning ramp. The divider ends at June Street, and the road returns to a four-lane undivided highway.

As the road intersects an at-grade crossing with the LIRR Central Branch and becomes a divided highway again north of Gear Avenue as it approaches NY 109. North of NY 109, CR 3 runs through the center of the Cemetery zone of southwestern Suffolk County along the following burial grounds;

Before leaving the cemetery zone, CR 3 becomes a divided highway again and passes by the headquarters of Newsday, which also includes the former right-of-way for the Long Island Motor Parkway. Both of these sites are on the southwest corner of CR 3 and CR 5 (Ruland Road), which is also the intersection of CR 95 (Colonial Springs Drive). North of CR 5 (Ruland Road) and CR 95 (Colonial Springs Drive), CR 3 becomes Pinelawn Road, and runs parallel to Old East Neck Road before moving away from it at CR 67 (Half Hollow Road), which leads to the only remaining drivable section of Long Island Motor Parkway. From there the road takes a northwesterly turn and crosses over Long Island Expressway east of exit 49, where it becomes a four-lane highway once again, but not before approaching NY 110. CR 3 and Pinelawn Road end at NY 110. However, the road continues northward as Sweet Hollow Road as it meanders through the Manetto Hills area past Gwynne Park and West Hills County Park before reaching NY 25.

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Lindenhurst NY 27A
CR 12
North Lindenhurst NY 27 Cloverleaf interchange
CR 2
NY 109
Southern State Parkway Exits 35 (Southern State Parkway)
Melville CR 5 / CR 95
CR 67
I-495 East of exit 49 (I-495)
NY 110
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 4[edit]

County Route 4
Location: Deer ParkFort Salonga
Existed: 1930–present

County Route 4 consists mainly of Commack Road. The road starts at a northeast angle off of NY 231, and immediately has an intersection with Carll's Straight Path to the northwest. The road continues to the northeast as it crosses the Main Line of the Long Island Rail Road. A realigned section exists on the western border of the former Edgewood State Hospital and current Pilgrim State Hospital. The segment in front of Edgewood Hospital was intended to either be replaced by or run parallel to the formerly proposed Babylon–Northport Expressway.

Between the Long Island Expressway and Jericho Turnpike, Commack Road is a four-lane undivided highway with sporadic residential frontage roads. Similar features were installed on parts of Larkfield Road and CR 11 (Pulaski Road).

North of NY 25, CR 4 becomes Bread-and-Cheese Hollow Road. Though the first two sites consist of churches listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the rest of the area is standard residential suburbia. North of Dovecotte Lane, Bread-and-Cheese Hollow Road runs mostly along the border between the towns of Huntington and Smithtown. New York State Bicycle Route 25A is shared with CR 4 between Burr Road and Scholar Road.

The segment approaching the high bridge for the Port Jefferson Branch of the Long Island Rail Road was unpaved well into the late 1970s. After crossing under this bridge, the road intersects CR 11 in East Northport. Within Middleville, CR 4 is the western terminus of Sunken Meadow Road, and the northern terminus of Old Bridge Road, which leads to Middleville Road, where a VA Hospital is located.

CR 4 ends at NY 25A. However, just west of this terminus is a town of Huntington-maintained street named Fort Pond Road which takes drivers to Indian Hills Country Club and Long Island Sound.

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
North Babylon NY 231
Deer Park CR 57 (Bay Shore Road)
Commack I-495 Exit 52 (I-495)
CR 13 (Crooked Hill Road)
CR 67 Long Island Motor Parkway
Northern State Parkway Exit 43 (Northern Parkway)
NY 25
East Northport CR 11 (Pulaski Road)
Fort Salonga NY 25A
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 5[edit]

County Route 5
Location: Melville

County Route 5 is a short, unsigned industrial county route known as Ruland Road. It runs parallel to a former section of the original Long Island Motor Parkway and towards the headquarters of Newsday.


County Route 6[edit]

County Route 6
Location: Hauppauge

County Route 6 is Rabro Drive. It serves the Hauppauge Industrial Park, and the state and county government office buildings.


County Route 7[edit]

County Route 7
Location: Brentwood

County Route 7, better known as Wicks Road, runs north and south from CR 13 to the Long Island Motor Parkway at the former Long Island Expressway exit 54. The road is entirely in Brentwood.

Originally, Wicks Road ran further north than CR 67 onto part of what is today Moreland Road, across the Northern State Parkway to the west side of Hoyt's Farm Town Park, and as far north as NY 25.


County Route 8[edit]

County Route 8
Location: YaphankMiddle Island

County Route 8 was reserved for the never-built Yaphank Bypass. It was intended to be a new four-lane road beginning at the vicinity of exit 66 of the Long Island Expressway, running west of the Carman's River and terminating at CR 21 near Bayliss (Bailey) Road.


County Route 9[edit]

County Route 9
Location: GreenlawnElwood
Length: 4.64 mi[1] (7.47 km)
Existed: 1936–present

County Route 9, known as Cuba Hill Road or Greenlawn Road, is an unsigned county road that runs through the town of Huntington. The road runs northwest to southeast, beginning as Greenlawn Road and crossing over the Long Island Rail Road as Cuba Hill Road. Its northern terminus is East Main Street (NY 25A) in Greenlawn, and it ends across from Burr Road on Elwood Road (CR 10) in Elwood.

CR 9 serves BAE Systems Long Island, located at the corner of Cuba Hill Road and Pulaski Road (CR 11) in Greenlawn, and James H. Boyd Intermediate School. The section of CR 9 between Little Plains Road through the intersection with CR 10 and Burr Road is part of New York State Bicycle Route 25A.

History

The Greenlawn Road portion of CR 9 was formerly CR 34. This portion was reassigned in 1930. The expansion of CR 9 led from the Long Island Rail Road tracks to CR 10, Elwood Road. This expansion is today Cuba Hill Road and was added on December 26, 1936. The road is currently unsigned; however, there were once signs that marked CR 9.

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Greenlawn NY 25A
CR 11
CR 86
Elwood CR 10 Continues east as Burr Road
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 10[edit]

County Route 10
Location: ElwoodNorthport
Length: 6.5 mi[citation needed] (10.5 km)
Existed: 1955–present

County Route 10, commonly referred to as Elwood Road, is a two-lane suburban county road. It runs from NY 25 in Elwood to NY 25A in Northport.

From the 1950s into the 1980s, there were proposals by the New York State Department of Transportation to build the Babylon–Northport Expressway within the vicinity of the west side of Elwood Road, with interchanges at both ends that included ramps utilizing CR 10. Suburban sprawl and public opposition to the road has resulted in traffic jams along the corridor.

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Elwood NY 25
CR 9
East Northport CR 11
Northport NY 25A
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 11[edit]

County Route 11
Location: Cold Spring HarborKings Park

County Route 11, commonly referred to as Pulaski Road, runs east and west between Cold Spring Harbor and Kings Park. CR 11 provides the closest access to the Port Jefferson Branch of the Long Island Rail Road, since it runs roughly parallel to the tracks throughout its span in western Suffolk County.


County Route 11A[edit]

County Route 11A
Location: GreenlawnEast Northport

County Route 11A was a former suffixed extension of CR 11 assigned to Pulaski Road between CR 86 and CR 10 from January 26, 1931 to September 21, 1966[1][2]


County Route 11B[edit]

County Route 11B
Location: Huntington StationGreenlawn

County Route 11B was a former suffixed extension of CR 11 assigned to Pulaski Road between NY 110 and CR 86 from December 28, 1931 to September 21, 1966[1][2]


County Route 11C[edit]

County Route 11C
Location: Cold Spring HarborHuntington Station

County Route 11C was a former suffixed extension of CR 11 assigned to Pulaski Road between NY 108 and NY 110 from November 27, 1933 to September 21, 1966[1][2]


County Route 12[edit]

County Route 12
Location: AmityvilleBabylon
Existed: 1959–present

County Route 12 runs east and west along the Babylon Branch of the Long Island Rail Road from the intersection of NY 110 and Old Sunrise Highway (unsigned NY 900D) to CR 34 in the village of Babylon. It was originally a suffixed extension of CR 50 until 1959.

At the intersection of CR 47, the elevated Copiague Station over the street is visible to the north. The station can also be seen from the next block at the intersection of an unnamed street leading to Railroad Avenue. The Babylon Branch finally runs along the north side of Oak Street between Garfield and Strong Avenues, where it crosses the Copiague–Lindenhurst village line.

In Lindenhurst, the name of CR 12 is changed to Hoffman Avenue. However, this name is also shared by a street running parallel to it on the north side of the Babylon Branch maintained by the village. Here it is quite common for motorists using one of the Hoffman avenues to look beneath the tracks and see the street name signs of the others. East of the intersection with CR 3, the road passes in front of Lindenhurst Station, while the village of Lindenhurst's Hoffman Avenue runs behind it.

In West Babylon, CR 12's name is changed to South Railroad Avenue, a name it will hold onto upon crossing the border with the village of Babylon until reaching NY 109, where it becomes Trolley Line Road. This segment is named for the former Babylon Railroad Company, which used the street as part of the route for its streetcar. Between CR 96 and NY 109, the Central Branch merges with the Babylon Branch. Just before the road straddles the north side of Argyle Lake and the park that it is named after, municipal parking become available on the opposite side of the park for Babylon Station. The station itself is not encountered until CR 12 intersects North Carll Avenue, and as the Railroad Avenue name is revived, the station is the final site along the north side of CR 12 before it ends at CR 34 (Deer Park Avenue).

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Amityville 0.00 0.00 CR 1 (County Line Road) Continuation of NY 900D
NY 110 (Broadway)
Copiague CR 47 (Great Neck Road)
Lindenhurst CR 3 (Wellwood Avenue)
West Babylon CR 96 (Great East Neck Road)
Village of Babylon NY 109 (Little East Neck Road)
CR 34 (Deer Park Avenue)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 13[edit]

County Route 13
Location: Bay ShoreCommack
Length: 7.57 mi[1] (12.18 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 13 is a 7.57-mile (12.18 km) county road that runs north and south from CR 4 near Commack to NY 27A in Bay Shore. Its includes Fifth Avenue, and Crooked Hill Road between Bay Shore and the vicinity of Commack. The road runs primarily east of Robert Moses Causeway and Sagtikos State Parkway, until it crosses over Sagtikos Parkway in the vicinity of Pilgrim State Hospital. The route was added to the county highway system on April 28, 1930, and extensions were made on July 9, 1945.[1]

Route description

CR 13 begins at NY 27A in Bay Shore. It heads northwest as the one-way Fifth Avenue, part of a one-way couplet that includes the southbound-only North Clinton Avenue (CR 13A) one block to the west. They converge south of CR 57 (Howell's Road), itself located just south of NY 27. CR 13 moves over the main road and service roads of NY 27, connecting to the highway by way of exit 43, a cloverleaf interchange. Continuing on, Fifth Avenue meets Brook Avenue, which leads to a shopping mall along Sunrise Highway before looping back to meet Third Avenue in Bay Shore.

Past Brook Avenue, the route takes on a more northerly routing as it heads into North Bay Shore and connects to the Heckscher State Parkway at exit 42. Farther north, CR 13 passes by the Entenmann's bakery factory prior to crossing the Main Line of the Long Island Rail Road and intersecting CR 100 (Suffolk Avenue) in Brentwood. The route's run as Fifth Avenue ends just north of CR 100 at a junction with CR 7 (Wicks Road), which continues north from the intersection on the routing established by Fifth Avenue. CR 13, meanwhile, forks to the northwest as Crooked Hill Road.

Not far from CR 7, the route serves both the Pilgrim State Psychiatric Center and Suffolk County Community College's Grant Campus and connects to the Sagtikos State Parkway at exit S2. Crooked Hill Road was originally southbound exit S1 on the Sagtikos Parkway. A traffic circle also existed at the southbound ramps to and from the parkway.[3] When the nearby Long Island Expressway was constructed, the southbound off-ramp was eliminated, but the on-ramp was left intact. The reconstruction of the Long Island Expressway–Sagtikos Parkway interchange from 1988–1991 revived a southbound connection from the parkway to Crooked Hill Road via exit S1W. Today, and as always, Crooked Hill Road is also accessible from exit S2, which connect to roads within the grounds of the Pilgrim State Psychiatric Center, including CR 106 (Community College Drive).

The route continues on, descending Crooked Hill to reach the Long Island Expressway and its service roads. It crosses under the highway between exits 52 and 53, but has no ramps to or from the main road. Instead, the only access is to the service roads that lead to the expressway westbound and from the expressway eastbound. North of the expressway, CR 13 begins to head in a more north–northeasterly direction that takes it on a largely parallel routing to that of nearby CR 4 (Commack Road). CR 13 ends when the two roads finally converge just south of the Long Island Motor Parkway in Commack.

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Bay Shore 0.00 0.00 NY 27A (Montauk Highway)
CR 50 (Union Boulevard)
CR 57 (Union Boulevard)
NY 27 (Sunrise Highway) Exit 43 (NY 27)
Heckscher Parkway Exit 42 (Heckscher Parkway)
Brentwood CR 100 (Suffolk Avenue)
CR 7 (Wicks Road)
Sagtikos Parkway Exit S2 (Sagtikos Parkway)
I-495 Service road access only
Commack CR 4 (Commack Road)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 13A[edit]

County Route 13A
Location: Bay Shore
Length: 0.62 mi[1] (1.00 km)
Existed: 1967[1]–present

County Route 13A is the southbound only segment of CR 13 in downtown Bay Shore. At the intersection of Reil Place all southbound traffic along CR  13 shifts to a parallel street called Clinton Avenue. This segment was designated CR 53[4] until May 22, 1967.[1] North of this switch, Clinton Avenue runs parallel to Fifth Avenue as a two-way street, until the intersection with Joseph Avenue, only to be cut off by the interchange with Sunrise Highway. Both CR 13 and CR 13A cross the LIRR Montauk Branch and intersect with CR 50 (Union Boulevard) before terminating at NY 27A.


County Route 14[edit]

County Route 14
Location: CommackKings Park
Length: 7.67 mi[1] (12.34 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 14 is a long county highway running north and south from NY 25 (Jericho Turnpike) in Commack to NY 25A in Kings Park. It runs parallel to the Sunken Meadow State Parkway between its southern terminus in Commack and Cowie Road. CR 14 ends near Kings Park Station, just two blocks east of CR 11. North of NY 25A the road turns into Church Street, then Kohr Road and runs along the east side of Sunken Meadow State Park until reaching Sunken Meadow Road. CR 14 was first added to the county highway system on January 27, 1930. A portion of former CR 2 (the Straight Path) was added to CR 14 on June 22, 1961.[1]

In 1978, New York State Department of Transportation built an interchange to and from the northbound lane of the Sunken Meadow State Parkway, in order to prevent accidents from motorists trying to cross NY 25 in order to get to CR 14 at exit SM3 E. This interchange was designated exit SM3A. West-to-northbound motorists from NY 25 use the on-ramp from this newer interchange to get to the parkway.

County Route 15[edit]

County Route 15
Location: HauppaugeSmithtown
Length: 1.35 mi[1] (2.17 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 15 is an unsigned, 1.35-mile (2.17 km) county highway in Hauppauge and Smithtown. The route begins at an intersection with NY 111 (the Smithtown–Islip Highway) to NY 25 and NY 25A (Main Street) in the Village of the Branch. CR 15 was added to the county highway system on January 27, 1930.[1]

County Route 16[edit]

County Route 16
Location: SmithtownSouth Haven
Length: 16.02 mi[1] (25.78 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 16 is a 16.02 miles (25.78 km) county-maintained highway stretching from NY 25 on the border of Smithtown and the Village of the Branch, eastward to Montauk Highway (CR 80) in Brookhaven consisting of part of four roads; Terry Road, Lake Shore Drive (formerly East Lake Terrace), Portion Road, and Horse Block Road. Between Terry Road and East Lake Terrace, it also includes all of Smithtown Boulevard. CR 16 has been on the Suffolk County highway system since January 27, 1930.[1]

Though CR 16 has run consistently from Smithtown to Brookhaven since the mid-1960s, this was not always the case. Many segments have been part of other county roads. Lake Shore Drive and Portion Road used to be part of CR 19 from the Smithtown–Brookhaven town line to Waverly Avenue in Farmingville. In 1960, this terminus was moved to Patchogue–Holbrook Road. The construction of Sunrise Highway in 1957 lead to the realignment of Horseblock Road west of its original eastern terminus with South Country Road (former Montauk Highway) in South Haven. Because the interchange is shared with CR 21, the new alignment was originally designated as CR 21A. Horse Block Road used to be a western extension of CR 56 between Victory Avenue, a frontage road along Sunrise Highway that begins at CR 46, in Brookhaven and Waverly Avenue in Farmingville. In 1964, it was moved only to Victory Avenue.


County Route 17[edit]

County Route 17
Location: East IslipHauppauge
Length: 5.51 mi[1] (8.87 km)
Existed: 1966–present

County Route 17 is a 5.51-mile (8.87 km) county road located in western Suffolk County. The route runs north–south from NY 27A in East Islip to NY 111 near Hauppauge, just south of exit 56 on I-495 (the Long Island Expressway). Originally, CR 17 was an alignment of NY 111 (designated as State Highway 1208 internally). On September 13, 1966, the alignment was transferred from the state to Suffolk County and redesignated CR 17.[1] The exit with the Heckscher State Parkway was added in the early 1990s.

Route description

The NY 111 designation was moved from Carleton Avenue to Islip Avenue, which runs parallel to Carleton Avenue between NY 27A and I-495, on September 13, 1966, in order to facilitate access to the Heckscher State Parkway. Evidence of County Road 17's former status as a State Highway can be found at the railroad bridge in Islip, which carries the Montauk Line of the Long Island Rail Road.[5] Between then and the mid-to-late 1980s, CR 17 passed over the Heckscher State Parkway with no access, other than to nearby frontage roads that were used for residents. Exit 43A, linking CR 17 to the parkway, was built in the 1980s. Carleton Avenue also runs through the grounds of the former Central Islip Psychiatric Center. Nursing quarters were located on a frontage road along the west side of the street. The hospital was closed in 1990, and converted into a campus for the New York Institute of Technology. The road was widened to four lanes in the 1990s from Heckscher Parkway to the northern terminus of the former hospital grounds. North of the NYIT Campus, Carleton Avenue squeezes through downtown Central Islip. The former Central Islip railroad station was on the corner of the Main Line of the Long Island Rail Road just south of County Road 100 (Suffolk Avenue). A modernized station was built down the tracks on the corner of CR 100 and Lowell Avenue.

North of Suffolk Avenue, CR 17 moves northwest onto Wheeler's Road. This section kept its given name while NY 111 was renamed "Wheeler Road" in order to distinguish the state route from CR 17. From there, CR 17 crosses County Road 67 (the Long Island Motor Parkway) and encounters Bridge Road, a side road that mainly runs parallel to Motor Parkway for much of its run south of the Long Island Expressway. The northern terminus is at a fork in the road with NY 111 roughly 250 yards south of I-495. The NY 111/CR 17 intersection has quite a history. It was originally an at-grade interchange with an overhead expressway signpost holding two signs mounted on the corner that could be seen from the Long Island Expressway. The NY 111 shield was moved from one sign to the next in 1966, but the outline of the former NY 111 shield could still be seen on the original sign. Eventually, as the road was downgraded and the area developed, this sign came down. A Texaco gas station was built at the fork in the road in the mid-1970s. It was shortly converted into a Park and Ride for traffic from the Long Island Expressway.

Major intersections
Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
East Islip 0.00 0.00 NY 27A (Montauk Highway)
CR 50 (Union Boulevard)
NY 27 (Sunrise Highway) Exit 46 (NY 27)
Islip Terrace Heckscher Parkway Exit 43A (Heckscher Parkway)
Central Islip CR 100 (Suffolk Avenue)
CR 67 (Long Island Motor Parkway)
Hauppauge 5.51 8.87 NY 111
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 18[edit]

County Route 18
Location: SayvilleHolbrook
Length: 3.90 mi[1] (6.28 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 18 is a 3.90-mile (6.28 km) county highway along Broadway Avenue from east of Sayville to Holbrook. It is an unsigned two-lane arterial spanning from Montauk Highway (CR 85) to CR 19 (Patchogue–Holbrook Road). A former segment of Broadway Avenue called "Old Broadway Avenue" runs east of the segment between Montauk Highway and somewhere south of Sunrise Highway along the border of Sans Soucci Lakes County Park and near a former Girl Scouts of the USA camp. The route was added to the Suffolk County highway system on January 27, 1930.[1]

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Sayville CR 85 (Montauk Highway)
Holtsville NY 27 (Sunrise Highway) Between exits 50 and 51
NY 454 (Veterans Memorial Highway)
Holbrook CR 19A (Main Street)
CR 19 (Patchogue–Holbrook Road)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 19[edit]

County Route 19
Location: PatchogueRonkonkoma
Length: 6.86 mi[1] (11.04 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 19 is a 6.86-mile (11.04 km) north–south arterial through central Suffolk County. The highway begins at an intersection with CR 65 in Patchogue. It connects several bedroom communities with major highways such as I-495 (the Long Island Expressway) and NY 27. CR 19 terminates at an intersection with CR 16 in Ronkonkoma. The route was added to the Suffolk County highway system on January 27, 1930, and was amended on January 29, 1965.[1]

Route description

The highway's southern terminus is at CR 65 (Division Street). It serves as a widened, upgraded version of local West Street, which continues south of Division Street toward the Great South Bay. The starting point of the highway is immediately to the west of the Long Island Railroad's Patchogue station. The road heads north and crosses Montauk Highway just west of downtown Patchogue. The road then curves west as it forms the southern bank of Great Patchogue Lake. Curving north again after passing the lake, the road assumes the name of Waverly Avenue, a pre-existing road that extends south of CR 19 toward Montauk Highway. Still with four lanes, the road passes near Saint Joseph's College's Patchogue branch campus before crossing NY 27 (Sunrise Highway). The diamond interchange here was built between 1988 and 1991 when NY 27 was converted from an urban boulevard to a limited-access freeway, although it was originally planned as a cloverleaf interchange.[6][7]

Leaving the Patchogue area, the road curves slightly left, as Waverly Avenue leaves CR 19 and continues its north–south route. Just to the north, CR 19 (now Patchogue–Holbrook Road) intersects two more partial-limited access highways. CR 99 (Woodside Avenue), which leads to the IRS center at Holtsville, has its terminus at CR 19 with a traffic signal. Less than a quarter mile to the north, CR 97 (Nicolls Road) passes overhead and has a diamond interchange with CR 19. Now entering Holbrook, the road divides various large bedroom communities. As it nears downtown Holbrook, the road moves onto a new alignment that was built between 1971 and 1973 to bypass the town. After this bypass was built, the old section was renamed Main Street, eliminated between the new section and CR 18 (Broadway Avenue) and designated CR 19A. The new alignment carries four lanes up and over the Long Island Railroad's Main Line, and was intended to have an interchange with Union Avenue and Main Street. Reassuming its former alignment, CR 19 then crosses the Long Island Expressway (I-495) with another diamond interchange. This interchange was the eastern terminus of the Long Island Expressway until 1971.

After the Long Island Expressway interchange, the highway narrows to just two lanes with center turn lane. The road again takes an S-curve to the west before heading north again. Halfway within this S-curve, CR 19 was originally intended to terminate at the never built "MacArthur Airport Expressway."[8] The character of this northernmost portion of the road is quite different from the rest, as the road has a much lower speed limit and even passes through a school zone roughly a mile before the terminus at CR 16.

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Patchogue 0.00 0.00 CR 65 (Division Street)
CR 85 (West Main Street)
NY 27 (Sunrise Highway) Exit 52 (NY 27)
Holtsville CR 61 (Waverly Avenue)
CR 99 (Woodside Avenue)
CR 97 (Nicoll's Road)
Holbrook CR 18 (Broadway Avenue) Unmarked; to CR 19A
CR 90 (Furrows Road) Unmarked; formerly proposed Central Suffolk Highway
Union Avenue To CR 19A
I-495 (Long Island Expressway) Exit 61 (I-495)
Ronkonkoma CR 16 (Portion Road)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 19A[edit]

County Route 19A
Location: Holbrook
Length: 0.9 mi[9] (1.4 km)

County Route 19A is a 0.9-mile (1.4 km) former segment of CR 19 in Holbrook. When Patchogue–Holbrook Road was realigned, this section was named Main Street. The old alignment of alignment through Holbrook, which was realigned to carry four lanes up and over the Long Island Railroad's Main Line, and was intended to have an interchange with Union Avenue and Main Street.

County Route 20[edit]

County Route 20
Location: Port JeffersonSound Beach
Length: 6.60 mi[1] (10.62 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 20 is the unsigned designation for a 6.60 miles (10.62 km) portion of North Country Road from NY 25A in Port Jefferson, just north of the railroad station, to an intersection with NY 25A in Sound Beach. Route 20 was added to the county highway system on January 27, 1930.[1] Until the 1980s it also included Sheep Pasture Road and Lower Sheep Pasture Road from Stony Brook to Port Jefferson.

CR 20 is shared with New York State Bicycle Route 25 east of Belle Terre Road in Port Jefferson, and runs through most of the Miller Place Historic District.

Sheep Pasture Road

Sheep Pasture Road is a road in Setauket that is an alternate route connecting Stony Brook to Port Jefferson Station. For a small section it is broken up into Upper Sheep Pasture Road and Lower Sheep Pasture Road. Its main claim to fame is its name which at one time meant that there were sheep and pastures around in abundance but currently it is a heavily travelled artery and is almost all residential. The only sheep to be found are in a petting zoo about a mile north of the road on Gnarled Hollow Road. There are a few businesses closer to the eastern end in Port Jefferson Station. There is a picturesque bridge over the Long Island Rail Road track as it enters Port Jefferson Station. Unfortunately this bridge has been the scene of quite a few suicides in recent years by despondent youths. One of the largest Greek Orthodox church complexes on Long Island is on this road. It is the responsibility of Brookhaven town to maintain this road.

County Route 21[edit]

County Route 21
Location: BrookhavenRocky Point
Length: 11.75 mi[1] (18.91 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 21 is a two lane, 11.75-mile (18.91 km) highway running from Brookhaven to Rocky Point. Its southern terminus is at CR 16 near the interchange with NY 27 in Brookhaven. The highway heads northward, terminating at an intersection with NY 25A in Rocky Point. CR 21 was added to the Suffolk County highway system on January 27, 1930.[1]

Route description

CR 21 ends at CR 80 (Montauk Highway), although this portion of the road was severed by Sunrise Highway. For all intents and purposes as an uninterrupted route, CR 21 ends at CR 16 (Horseblock Road) in Yaphank. The road continues through Yaphank, a formerly agrarian area that has been built up by Suffolk County into a government office center, which includes the Suffolk County Police Department headquarters, and one of the main county jails. In conjunction with the development of this zone, CR 21 was widened in the mid-1970s. This project included a bridge over the Long Island Railroad Main Line as well as some local streets, one of which leads directly to Yaphank Station. North of the tracks, the Suffolk County Almshouse Barn can be found west of the road, as well as the former Suffolk County Sanitorium, and other county government buildings. In this area, CR 21 also crosses I-495, which was built through the existing road in the late 1960s. The interchange here was not finished until 2000, when a westbound on-ramp and an eastbound off-ramp were added.

North of the Long Island Expressway, Yaphank Avenue runs on top of the dam for Lower Yaphank Lake before its terminus at East Main Street. Here the historic Homan-Gerard House and Mills can be found on the southeast corner, while the former Yaphank Garage can be found on the southwest corner. CR 21 makes a left turn at the intersection and proceeds through historic Yaphank. East Main Street leads to another historic Long Island road named Moriches–Middle Island Road, which took residents between Rocky Point and The Moricheses long before the automobile was invented, let alone the Suffolk County Highway System. Near Upper Yaphank Lake, CR 21 intersects with West Main Street, at one of two former Yaphank triangles (the other being at Mill Road and Patchogue–Yaphank Road). At this point, CR 21 resumes its northward heading. Also at this point, a former section of the road is visible on land now owned by the Suffolk County Parks Department. It is visible diagonally across the street from and north of a building formerly owned by New York Telephone.

CR 21 meanders through a variety of landscapes as it heads north to Middle Island, including farmland and forest. It passes close to the Carman's River at this point, particularly in the area of Cathedral Pines County Park. This area was notorious as one of the most deadly stretches of the road until safety improvements realigned and modernized the roadway near East Bartlett Road and again north of Longwood Road. Another former section of road called Old Middle Island–Yaphank Road breaks off to the left near CR 21's intersection with NY 25. North of NY 25, the name of the road changes from Yaphank–Middle Island Road to Rocky Point–Yaphank Road. The former alignment of the road continues roughly parallel to the newer road, rejoining it near the intersection of Bayliss Road (also known as Bailey Road). Additionally, a former meander in the road is visible on either side of CR 21 just south of Whiskey Road.

Between Middle Island and Rocky Point, much of CR 21 runs through the Rocky Point Natural Resources Management Area, a major conservation area on land once owned by the Radio Corporation of America. This land was once considered the world's largest radio transmitting field.[10] Here, the road is given a second name of Marconi Boulevard. North of the former RCA Labs, CR 21 runs between a high school and a housing project, before terminating at NY 25A. North of NY 25A, the road turns into Hallock Landing Road as it heads towards the bluffs of the Long Island Sound.

History

CR 21 was added to the Suffolk County highway system on January 27, 1930, on various roads dating back to colonial times. A widening project took place along Yaphank Avenue during the 1970s but various realignments took place along Yaphank–Middle Island Road, and Rocky Point–Yaphank Road before then. Though CR 21 runs almost the entire breadth of Central Long Island, it does not intersect many major highways. Due to steep public opposition to highway improvements, there are multiple proposed and never-built highways that would have intersected this road:

  • CR 99 was supposed to be extended east of CR 16 terminating at an interchange with CR 21.
  • CR 90 was supposed to have an interchange with Yaphank Avenue near the Suffolk County Police Department Headquarters. This was to be part of the proposed Central Suffolk Highway designed to reconnect the two broken ends of NY 24.
  • CR 101 was either supposed to cross over Lower Yaphank Lake and East Main Street or at the east triangle with West Main Street and Middle Island–Yaphank Road. Both proposed extensions were to lead to William Floyd Parkway between Parr Meadows and Longwood Road.
  • CR 24 was supposed to be upgraded to an extension between East Bartlett Road and Longwood Road.
  • CR 8, the formerly proposed Yaphank Bypass, was supposed to terminate between Bayliss Road (also known as Bailey Road) and Miller Place–Yaphank Road.
  • CR 111 was supposed to have an interchange at the intersection of Whiskey Road.
  • CR 26 was supposed to have an interchange at the north end of the Rocky Point Natural Resources Management Area. It was intended to be relocated from the North Fork and upgraded as part of NY 347.

With the construction of exit 57 along Sunrise Highway, which interrupted original sections of both Horse Block Road and Yaphank Avenue, the new section of Horse Block Road was originally designated CR 21A. This designation was eventually integrated into part of CR 16.

Major intersections
Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Yaphank 0.00 0.00 CR 16 (Horseblock Road) to NY 27
I-495
Mill Road To CR 101
Middle Island CR 24 (Longwood Road)
NY 25 (Middle County Road)
Rocky Point 11.75 18.91 NY 25A (North Country Road)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 21A[edit]

County Route 21A
Location: South Haven

County Route 21A was a suffixed alternate of CR 21 created during the construction of exit 57 along Sunrise Highway, which interrupted original sections of both Horse Block Road and Yaphank Avenue, The new section was officially part of Horse Block Road, but was eventually deleted, when it was integrated into part of CR 16.

County Route 22[edit]

County Route 22
Location: JamesportNorthville
Length: 2.45 mi[1] (3.94 km)
Existed: 1930[1]–present

County Route 22 is an unsigned, 2.45-mile (3.94 km) north–south county highway. Known locally as Manor Lane, the designation runs from NY 25 in the community of Jamesport to an intersection with Sound Avenue, a former alignment of NY 25A,[11] in Northville, just east of CR 23. CR 22 has been in the Suffolk County highway system since January 27, 1930.[1]

Major intersections
Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Jamesport 0.00 0.00 NY 25 (Main Road)
Northville 2.45 3.94 Sound Avenue
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 23[edit]

County Route 23
Location: AquebogueNorthville
Length: 1.75 mi[1] (2.82 km)
Existed: 1930–present

County Route 23 is an unsigned, 1.75-mile (2.82 km) north–south county highway. CR 23, designated Church Lane, begins at an intersection with NY 25 (Main Road) in Aquebogue and terminates at an intersection with Sound Avenue in Northville. CR 23 was added to the county highway system on January 27, 1930.[1]

Major intersections
Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Aquebogue 0.00 0.00 NY 25 (Main Road)
Northville 1.75 2.82 Sound Avenue
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 24[edit]

County Route 24
Location: Middle IslandUpton
Existed: 1975–present

County Route 24 is an unsigned county highway from CR 21 (Yaphank–Middle Island Road) in the community of Middle Island to CR 46 (William Floyd Parkway) in Upton. CR 24, designated Longwood Road, also serves Cathedral Pines County Park at its western terminus. The route, which was originally named South Manor Road, was added to the county highway system for Suffolk County on March 25, 1975.[1]

Major intersections
Location Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
Middle Island 0.00 0.00 CR 21 (Yaphank–Middle Island Road)
Upton CR 46 (William Floyd Parkway)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

County Route 25[edit]

County Route 25
Location: Center MorichesWading River
Length: 11.05 mi[1] (17.78 km)

County Route 25 was an 11.05-mile (17.78 km) north-south two-lane highway running from Center Moriches to Wading River. CR 25 went from the Montauk Highway in Center Moriches to an intersection with NY 25A in the community of Riverhead. The highway was designated on May 1, 1968 from former CR 66 along Brookfield Avenue, Wading River Road and Schultz Road.[1] During the 1970s, the highway was to receive widening and realignment projects west of the existing Wading River Road. The projects were to stretch from exit 69 on the Long Island Expressway (I-495) southward to the Montauk Highway and the western terminus of the Moriches Bypass, designated CR 98. The new section of the road was never built, and the CR 25 designation was eventually removed.


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax "County Road System – County of Suffolk, New York" (PDF). Suffolk County Department of Public Works. Retrieved June 4, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d Anderson, Steve. "Suffolk County Routes 1–25". NYCRoads. Retrieved January 26, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Pilgrim State Psychiatric Center Map". Long Island Oddities. Retrieved April 2, 2010. 
  4. ^ Hagstrom Map (1969). Atlas of Suffolk County, New York (Map).
  5. ^ "October 12, 2001 trestle photo". TrainsAreFun. Retrieved April 2, 2010. 
  6. ^ [Town of Brookhaven Zoning Map; August 21, 2000(and earlier)]
  7. ^ [Hagstrom's Atlas of Suffolk County, New York (1969, and other dates)]
  8. ^ Proposed Park and Ride Center; Lake Ronkonkoma (Suffolk County Department of Planning)
  9. ^ Google Inc. "Overview map of County Route 19A". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Main+St%2FOld+Patchogue-Holbrook+Rd&daddr=Main+St%2FOld+Patchogue-Holbrook+Rd&geocode=FbDAbgId89-k-w%3BFU6dbgIdQAyl-w&hl=en&mra=dme&mrcr=0&mrsp=1&sz=16&sll=40.806127,-73.071442&sspn=0.007926,0.013797&ie=UTF8&ll=40.80499,-73.068073&spn=0.007926,0.013797&z=16. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  10. ^ "Radio Central (1922)". Retrieved April 2, 2010. 
  11. ^ Kendall Refining Company (1931). New York (Map). Cartography by H.M. Gousha Company.

External links[edit]