Craccum

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Craccum is the weekly magazine produced by the Auckland University Students' Association of the University of Auckland, New Zealand. It was founded in 1927. The name originated from the scrambled acronym of "Auckland University College Men's Common Room Committee".[1]

Craccum is the largest student magazine in New Zealand, with a weekly distribution of 10,000 - 12,000 copies. It is anomalous as a publication due to the fact that the position of editor is annually elected by the students' association.

The magazine has at times been controversial, with stories on how to shoplift, the drawbacks of various methods of committing suicide,[2][3] drug use guides, recipes for illegal drugs and drug rape guides.[4] Craccum is also a popular proving ground for New Zealand mainstream media, with many of its alumni moving on to publications such as The Listener, The New Zealand Herald, The National Business Review and Metro magazine.

In 1989 the publication was re-branded "Torso" for the final issues of that year, an event noted in the mainstream media. However the original name was re-established the following year.

In 2005, the rights to the front cover of the sellout-themed issue of Craccum were auctioned on TradeMe. Salient, the student magazine for Victoria University of Wellington, won the auction. In 2011 the rights to the front cover of the women's rights-themed issue were again auctioned on TradeMe, with proceeds going to Women's Refuge; the auction was won by the Tertiary Education Union (TEU).[5]

Craccum is a member of the Aotearoa Student Press Association (ASPA). In 2007, Craccum won the award for Best Publication at the ASPA Awards for the first time. It has not won the award since.[6]

Editors[edit]

The Craccum Editor has been elected annually since 1986. Before 1986, the Editor was appointed each year by the Craccum Administration Board. The election for Craccum Editor is held in the second semester, on the same ballot as the AUSA portfolio elections. Former Craccum Editor Tim Shadbolt (1972) is Mayor of Invercargill and former Mayor of Waitemata City. Mike Rann (1975) was Premier of South Australia 2002 to 2012.

  • 2014 - Ana Lenard and Kit Haines
  • 2013 - Aditya Vasudevan and Calum Redpath
  • 2012 - Thomas Dykes
  • 2011 - Spencer Dowson and Rhys Mathewson
  • 2010 - Dan Sloan
  • 2009 - Matthew Harnett and Valentine Watkins
  • 2008 - Dan Sloan
  • 2007 - Simon Coverdale and Matthew Backhouse
  • 2006 - Ryan Sproull
  • 2005 - Alec Hutchinson and Stian Overdahl
  • 2004 - Allan Swann and Hannah Jennings-Voykovich
  • 2003 - Christopher Garland
  • 2002 - Colin Mitchell and Susan Edmunds
  • 2001 - John Marshall
  • 2000 - Ben Thomas and James Cardno
  • 1999 - Gareth Elliot and Thomas Shadbolt
  • 1998 - Alistair Bone
  • 1997 - Martyn 'Bomber' Bradbury
  • 1996 - Tim Mullins and Anton Pichler
  • 1995 - Martyn 'Bomber' Bradbury and Stewart Gardiner
  • 1994 - Penny Murray
  • 1993 - Peter Malcouronne and Vangelis Vitalis
  • 1992 - Jo Mackay
  • 1991 - Jo Mackay
  • 1990 - Steve Amanono and Sarah Murray (Jan-May);
    Peter Gray, Mark Roach, Simon Holroyd (Interim);
    Mark Roach, Wendy Newton, Peter Gray (Jun-Dec)
  • 1989 - Aiden-B. Howard (Jan-May);
    Michael Lamb (May-Dec)
  • 1988 - Miriam de Graaf, Carl Fagan, Simon Holroyd and Wendy Lawson (Jan-Mar);
    Miriam de Graaf, Carl Fagan, Simon Holroyd (Mar-Jun);
    Miriam de Graaf, Simon Holroyd (Jun-Dec)
  • 1987 - Rachael Callender, Derek Craig, Kerry Hoole, Ewen Smith, Patrick Stodart, Victoria Turner and David Ward
  • 1986 - Peter Boys
  • 1985 - Pam Goode and Brigitta Noble
  • 1984 - Neil Morrison and Rangi Chadwick
  • 1983 - Louise Rafkin
  • 1982 - David Faulls
  • 1981 - David Kirkpatrick
  • 1980 - Katherine White
  • 1979 - David Merritt
  • 1978 - Louise Chunn
  • 1977 - Francis Stark
  • 1976 - Allan Bell
  • 1975 - Mike Rann
  • 1974 - Brent Lewis
  • 1973 - Stephen Ballantyne, Bob Kerr, and Bob Hillier (from January to July)
  • 1972 - Heather McInnes, Tim Shadbolt and Gordon Clifton
  • 1971 - Stephen Chan, Robert Wellington
  • 1970 - Ted Sheehan
  • 1969 - Mac Price
  • 1968 - George de Bres
  • 1967 - Geoff Chappelle (Jan-Jun);
    George De Bres and Michael Volkering (Jun-Dec)
  • 1966 - Lei Lealulu and Dave Fleming (Jan-Jun);
    Mike Morrissey (Jun-Dec)
  • 1965 - C. A. Moir
  • 1964 - John Sanders
  • 1963 - Dick Johnstone
  • 1962 - Francis J. Lillie
  • 1961 - Adrienne Rhodes
  • 1960 - Felicity Maidment
  • 1959 - Jonathan Hunt
  • 1958 - S. E. Cox and D. R. Taylor
  • 1957 - R. W. Armstrong
  • 1956 - D. J. Stone and R. W. Armstrong
  • 1955 - Jim Traue and David Stone
  • 1953 - Brian Smart and Peter Boag
  • 1952 - Gerald Utting (Jan-Aug);
    John Anderson and Geoff Fuller (Aug-Dec)
  • 1951 - NO RECORD
  • 1950 - Peter Timm, David Grace and Roderick Smith (Jan-Mar);
    Gerald Utting and M. Lovegrove (Mar-Dec)
  • 1949 - Peter Cape
  • 1948 - John Ellis (Jan-Sept);
    Peter Cape (Sept-Dec)
  • 1947 - Nora Bayly
  • 1946 - J. A. Nathan
  • 1945 - R. I. F. Pattison
  • 1944 - Travis Wilson
  • 1943 - Betty Belshaw (née Sweetman)
  • 1942 - NO RECORD
  • 1941 - G. I. Cawkwell
  • 1940 - P. W. Day
  • 1939 - P. W. Day (Jan-Mar);
    Avenal Holcombe (Mar-Dec)
  • 1938 - A. O. Woodhouse
  • 1937 - Eric H. Halstear
  • 1933-1936 - NO RECORD
  • 1932 - J. A. E. Mulgan
  • 1931 - Eric Harold Blow
  • 1930 - P. L. Soljak (Jan-Jun);
    J. A. E. Mulgan (Jun-Aug)
  • 1928-1929 - NO RECORD
  • 1927 A. K. Matthews, Nigel Wilson and Winifred McNickle

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sinclair, Keith. A History of the University of Auckland, Auckland University Press, 1983. ISBN 0-19-648021-3
  2. ^ Case Number: 786 HEALTH WAIKATO AGAINST CRACCUM, New Zealand Press Council, June 2000.
  3. ^ Suicide Is Painless? - The Craccum Articles, scoop.co.nz, 7 March 2000.
  4. ^ "Craccum defends drug rape story". Television New Zealand. 9 October 2002. Retrieved 26 September 2011. 
  5. ^ "TradeMe". Retrieved 10/8/2011.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  6. ^ Aotearoa Student Press Association. "Craccum Named Best Student Publication For 2007". Retrieved 16 August 2011. 

External links[edit]

Official website