Craig Serjeant

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Craig Serjeant
Personal information
Full name Craig Stanton Serjeant
Born 1 November 1951 (1951-11) (age 62)
Nedlands, Western Australia
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style -
Career statistics
Competition Tests ODIs
Matches 12 3
Runs scored 522 73
Batting average 23.72 24.33
100s/50s 1/2 0/0
Top score 124 46
Balls bowled - -
Wickets - -
Bowling average - -
5 wickets in innings - -
10 wickets in match - n/a
Best bowling - -
Catches/stumpings 13/- 1/-
Source: Cricinfo[1], 12 December 2005

Craig Stanton Serjeant (born 1 November 1951 in Nedlands, Western Australia) is a former Australian cricketer who played in 12 Tests and 3 ODIs from 1977 to 1978.

Career[edit]

Serjeant made his first class debut in 1976-77 for Western Australia. He enjoyed a successful season, scoring 730 runs at an average of 66.36, which saw him selected in the squad of the 1977 Ashes.

He was one of the better performed batsmen during the early stage of the tour, and was selected to play in the first test, where he scored 81.[2] However dual failures in the second led to him being dropped until the fifth test.

Serjeant turned down a contract to play World Series Cricket and was appointed vice captain under Bob Simpson for the 1977-78 series against India. His only score of note was 85 in the third test, which he later described as his best innings.[3] He was dropped for the final test of the series, but was kept on for the tour to the West Indies.

During that season Serjeant scored his only test century, his innings of 124 in the third test helping lead Australia to a famous victory.[4] He struggled early during the 1978-79 season and was unable to regain his place in the Australian team, but performed solidly for Western Australia for the next few seasons.[5]

Post-cricket career[edit]

Serjeant graduated from Curtin University with a degree in science in 1972 and worked as a chemist at SCGH for 12 years. He then became a financial planner, working under former Australian bowler Sam Gannon.[6]

References[edit]

External links[edit]