Craighill Channel Upper Range Rear Light

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Craighill Channel Upper Range Rear Light
Craighill Cut-off Channel Range Rear Light Station (Baltimore County, Maryland).jpg
Craighill Channel Upper Range Rear Light
Craighill Channel Upper Range Rear Light is located in Maryland
Craighill Channel Upper Range Rear Light
Location East side of Sparrows Point on the north shore of the Patapsco River
Coordinates 39°12′58.32″N 76°27′45.72″W / 39.2162000°N 76.4627000°W / 39.2162000; -76.4627000Coordinates: 39°12′58.32″N 76°27′45.72″W / 39.2162000°N 76.4627000°W / 39.2162000; -76.4627000
Year first lit 1886
Automated 1929
Foundation stone
Construction iron skeleton tower
Tower shape pyramidal with square central shaft
Height 64 feet (20 m)
Characteristic Fixed red (originally white)
Cut-off Channel Range Rear Light Station
Nearest city Edgemore, Maryland
Area less than one acre
Built 1886
Governing body COAST GUARD
MPS Light Stations of the United States MPS
NRHP Reference #

02001423

[1]
Added to NRHP December 02, 2002

The Craighill Channel Upper Range Rear Light is one of a pair of range lights that marks the second section of the shipping channel into Baltimore harbor.

History[edit]

This light was constructed in 1885 as part of a range light pair to mark the then newly-excavated Craighill Cutoff Channel. A modest iron skeleton tower was erected, pyramidal in form with a wooden, corrugated iron-sheathed square shaft at its center to house the lamp and the access stairway. Its only architectural ornaments were a few windows to light the stairwell and a gallery to allow the outside of the light's window to be cleaned. A keeper's house was built nearby, connected to the light by a brick walk. The original light was a locomotive headlight displaying a fixed white light; this has since been replaced with a more conventional fixture displaying a red light.

The grounds were (and are) surrounded by private property, and in 1888 there was a dispute over access to the light. Other than that the light has passed a quiet life, punctuated only by automation in 1929 and the demolition of the keeper's house. It is still an active aid to navigation.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 

External links[edit]