Cramp fasciculation syndrome

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Cramp fasciculation syndrome (CFS) is a rare[1] peripheral nerve hyperexcitability disorder. It is more severe than the related (and common) disorder known as benign fasciculation syndrome; it causes fasciculations, cramps, pain, fatigue, and muscle stiffness similar to those seen in neuromyotonia (another related condition).[2] Patients with CFS, like those with neuromyotonia, may also experience paresthesias.[3] Most cases of cramp fasciculation syndrome are idiopathic.[4]

Cramp fasciculation syndrome is diagnosed by clinical examination and electromyography (EMG).[5] Fasciculation is the only abnormality[6] (if any)[7] seen with EMG. Cramp fasciculation syndrome is a chronic condition.[8] Treatment options include anti-seizure medications such as carbamazepine, immunosuppressive drugs and plasmapheresis.[4]

Signs and Symptoms[edit]

Symptoms are very similar to those found in benign fasciculation syndrome and include:[9]

Diagnosis[edit]

The procedure of diagnosis for Cramp Fasciculation Syndrome (CFS) is closely aligned with the diagnosis procedure for benign fasciculation syndrome (BFS). The differentiation between a diagnosis of BFS versus CFS is usually more severe and prominent pain, cramps and stiffness associated with CFS.

Treatment[edit]

Treatment is similar to treatment for benign fasciculation syndrome.

Carbamazepine therapy has been found to provide moderate reductions in symptoms.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jansen, P. H. P.; Dijck, J. A. A. M.; Verbeek, A. L. M.; Durian, F. W.; Joosten, E. M. G. (1991). "Estimation of the frequency of the muscular pain-fasciculation syndrome and the muscular cramp-fasciculation syndrome in the adult population". European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience 241 (2): 102–4. doi:10.1007/BF02191150. PMID 1834178. 
  2. ^ Ropper, Allan H.; Brown, Robert H. (2005). "Disorders of Muscle Characterized by Cramp, Spasm, Pain, and Localized Masses". Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology (8th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill. pp. 1277–8. ISBN 978-0-07-141620-7. 
  3. ^ Hart, Ian K.; Maddison, Paul; Newsom‐Davis, John; Vincent, Angela; Mills, Kerry R. (2002). "Phenotypic variants of autoimmune peripheral nerve hyperexcitability". Brain 125 (8): 1887–95. doi:10.1093/brain/awf178. PMID 12135978. 
  4. ^ a b Lagueny, A (2005). "Cramp-fasciculation syndrome". Revue neurologique 161 (12 Pt 1): 1260–6. PMID 16340924. 
  5. ^ Washington University in St. Louis, Neuromuscular: Cramp-Fasciculation Syndromes, http://neuromuscular.wustl.edu/mother/activity.html#crampfas
  6. ^ Tahmoush, AJ; Alonso, RJ; Tahmoush, GP; Heiman-Patterson, TD (1991). "Cramp-fasciculation syndrome: a treatable hyperexcitable peripheral nerve disorder". Neurology 41 (7): 1021–4. doi:10.1212/wnl.41.7.1021. PMID 1648679. 
  7. ^ TeleEMG website, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)/Motor Neuron Disease, Page 2 http://www.teleemg.com/new/als2.htm
  8. ^ de Entrambasaguas, Manuel; Ortega-Albás, Juan-José; Martínez-Lozano, María-Dolores; Díaz, José-Ramón (2006). "Bronchial involvement in the cramp-fasciculation syndrome". European neurology 56 (2): 124–6. doi:10.1159/000095703. PMID 16960453. 
  9. ^ a b Tahmoush, A. J.; Alonso, R. J.; Tahmoush, G. P.; Heiman-Patterson, T. D. (1991). "Cramp-fasciculation syndrome: A treatable hyperexcitable peripheral nerve disorder". Neurology 41 (7): 1021–4. PMID 1648679.  edit
  10. ^ Allan H. Ropper; Robert H. Brown. "Chapter 55. Disorders of Muscle". Adams and Victor's Principles of Neurology (8th ed.). pp. 1277–1278. 
  11. ^ Hart, I.; Maddison, P.; Newsom-Davis, J.; Vincent, A.; Mills, K. R. (August 2002). "Phenotypic Variants of Autoimmune Peripheral Nerve Hyperexcitability". Brain 125 (8): 1887–1895. doi:10.1093/brain/awf178. PMID 12135978. 

External links[edit]