Cranford, New Jersey

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Cranford, New Jersey
Township
Township of Cranford
Map of Cranford Township in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Cranford Township in Union County. Inset: Location of Union County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Cranford, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Cranford, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°39′23″N 74°18′17″W / 40.656391°N 74.30483°W / 40.656391; -74.30483Coordinates: 40°39′23″N 74°18′17″W / 40.656391°N 74.30483°W / 40.656391; -74.30483[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Union
Incorporated March 14, 1871
Government[7]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Thomas H. Hannen, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2013)[3][4]
 • Administrator Joseph M. Hartnett[5]
 • Clerk Tara Rowley[6]
Area[2]
 • Total 4.869 sq mi (12.609 km2)
 • Land 4.830 sq mi (12.509 km2)
 • Water 0.039 sq mi (0.100 km2)  0.80%
Area rank 281st of 566 in state
10th of 21 in county[2]
Elevation[8] 82 ft (25 m)
Population (2010 Census)[9][10][11][12]
 • Total 22,625
 • Estimate (2012[13]) 23,016
 • Rank 112th of 566 in state
8th of 21 in county[14]
 • Density 4,684.6/sq mi (1,808.7/km2)
 • Density rank 117th of 566 in state
11th of 21 in county[14]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07016[15][16]
Area code(s) 908[17]
FIPS code 3403915640[18][2][19]
GNIS feature ID 0882214[20][2]
Website www.cranford.com/township/

Cranford is a township in Union County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 22,625,[10][11][12] reflecting an increase of 47 (+0.2%) from the 22,578 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 55 (-0.2%) from the 22,633 counted in the 1990 Census.[21]

Cranford was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 14, 1871, from portions of the Townships of Clark, Linden, Springfield, Union and Westfield. Portions of the township were taken to form Garwood (March 19, 1903) and Kenilworth (March 13, 1907).[22]

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Cranford as its 34th best place to live in its 2010 rankings of the "Best Places To Live".[23]

Geography[edit]

Cranford is located at 40°39′23″N 74°18′17″W / 40.656391°N 74.30483°W / 40.656391; -74.30483 (40.656391,-74.30483). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 4.869 square miles (12.609 km2), of which, 4.830 square miles (12.509 km2) of it is land and 0.039 square miles (0.100 km2) of it (0.80%) is water.[1][2]

There are nine municipalities bordering the township: Garwood and Westfield to the west, Springfield Township to the north, Kenilworth to the northeast, Roselle and Roselle Park to the east, Linden to the southeast and Clark to the south.

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Cranford has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[24]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,184
1890 1,717 45.0%
1900 2,854 66.2%
1910 3,641 27.6%
1920 6,001 64.8%
1930 11,126 85.4%
1940 12,860 15.6%
1950 18,602 44.7%
1960 26,424 42.0%
1970 27,391 3.7%
1980 24,573 −10.3%
1990 22,633 −7.9%
2000 22,578 −0.2%
2010 22,625 0.2%
Est. 2012 23,016 [13] 1.7%
Population sources:
1880-1920[25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[9][10][11][12]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 22,625 people, 8,583 households, and 6,154 families residing in the township. The population density was 4,684.6 per square mile (1,808.7 /km2). There were 8,816 housing units at an average density of 1,825.4 per square mile (704.8 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 91.85% (20,781) White, 2.62% (592) Black or African American, 0.08% (18) Native American, 2.84% (643) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.03% (234) from other races, and 1.56% (353) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.51% (1,474) of the population.[10]

There were 8,583 households of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.2% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.3% were non-families. 24.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.15.[10]

In the township, 24.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 23.6% from 25 to 44, 29.3% from 45 to 64, and 17.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.8 years. For every 100 females there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.2 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $107,052 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,725) and the median family income was $128,534 (+/- $7,200). Males had a median income of $81,979 (+/- $7,672) versus $61,649 (+/- $4,965) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $48,008 (+/- $2,581). About 2.1% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 22,578 people, 8,397 households, and 6,222 families residing in the township. The population density was 4,684.2 people per square mile (1,808.6/km²). There were 8,560 housing units at an average density of 1,775.9 per square mile (685.7/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 93.70% White, 2.58% Black or African American, 0.04% Native American, 2.15% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.67% from other races, and 0.84% from two or more races. 3.89% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.[30][31]

There were 8,397 households out of which 32.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.0% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 21.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.09.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 23.3% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 29.4% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 17.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 90.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.2 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $76,338, and the median income for a family was $86,624. Males had a median income of $60,757 versus $41,020 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,283. About 1.0% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Commerce[edit]

Stores in the downtown area.
Intersection.

Cranford has long been considered a center of commerce. The Cranford Business Park on the south side of town consists of a complex of office buildings housing a variety of major corporations and small businesses. Along North Avenue are a variety of buildings housing doctors and other businesses. Law offices predominate in small buildings around town. Banks are also extremely common throughout the township, which hosts at least half a dozen. Downtown Cranford is the main retail business district for the township. Consisting of a variety of small family owned businesses on both sides of the railroad tracks, there has been a debate in the community over the direction of the downtown. With neighboring communities seeing downtown development and a focus on either recruiting chain store or upscale small stores, Cranford has been debating the issue. On the south side of town, the Centennial Avenue Business District is a small shopping district with a mix of neighborhood stores. There is a push to redevelop this business district.

View around a lake in Nomahegan Park across from Union County College.

The recent focus of downtown Cranford has been to recruit more restaurants into the downtown and allow for a nightlife to flourish. Amongst the existing nightlife, Cranford holds a number of local restaurant/bars: The Office, The Riverside Inn, Cranford Hotel, The Kilkenny House, Ye Olde Rathskellar, among others. On the south side of the community, the Cranford Crossings redevelopment project features retail space, apartments, and a new parking deck. The Riverfront redevelopment project is proposed on South Avenue to bring more business and housing into downtown Cranford.

In the 1980s the downtown was renovated to take on a Victorian feel. This included the installation of new light fixtures and cobblestone sidewalks, along with decorative planters and benches. A Victorian street clock was installed in the center of town, allowing for the creation of a small pocket park in the center of the downtown. The clock park has become a popular hangout for teenagers who are walking to and from school.

In the 1980s, Cranford founded the first special improvement district in New Jersey, which allows for the downtown district to have a special tax on building and business owners for downtown development and marketing which is managed by the Cranford Downtown Management Corporation.[33] The DMC has used its budget for development projects, to recruit new businesses and to market shopping in Cranford. Various downtown sales and street fairs are administered by the DMC. The DMC is governed by a Board of Directors consisting of business owners and residents, which is appointed by the Township Committee. The DMC Board appoints a DMC Director, who runs the day-to-day operations of the corporation.

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Scene near downtown.

Cranford is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[7]

The Committee members elect a chairman of the committee who assumes the title of Mayor. Similarly, a Deputy Mayor is elected. Both positions carry one-year terms. Four of the commissioners take on departmental oversight assignments as Commissioner of Finance, Commissioner of Public Safety, Commissioner of Public Works and Engineering, and Commissioner of Public Affairs. The Mayor of Cranford does not take on a departmental assignment. The commissioners are part-time officials and the township government is run day to day by the Township Administrator and various department heads. The Chief of Police is James Wozniak.[34]

As of 2013, members of the Cranford Township Committee are Mayor Thomas H. Hannen, Jr. (D, 2013), Deputy Mayor Edward O'Malley (Commissioner of Public Works and Engineering; D, 2013), Lisa Adubato Nesi (Commissioner of Public Affairs; R, 2014), Kevin Campbell (Commissioner of Public Safety; D, 2013) and Andis Kalnins (Commissioner of Finance; R, 2014).[4][35][36][37]

Women in elected office[edit]

As of 2012, eight women have been elected to the Cranford Township Committee and three women have served as Mayor of Cranford. Barbara Brande was the first woman elected to the Township Committee and the first woman mayor of the township. Mayor Brande was elected to the Township Committee in 1974 and reelected in 1977, serving a total of six years. She was Mayor of Cranford in 1977. Carolyn Vollero, who served the longest length of time for a woman on the Township Committee - nine years - was Cranford's second female Mayor in 1994. Barbara Bilger, the township's third female mayor in 2002 and 2004, was also the first woman to serve two terms as the township's mayor. Mayor Bilger is the first Republican woman to serve as a Township Commissioner and as mayor.

Union County Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski is a Cranford resident and the first woman from Cranford to be elected to the Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Freeholder Kowalski was an unsuccessful candidate for Cranford Township Committee in 1999 and served as Union County Freeholder Chairwoman in 2007.

Female Township Commissioners
  • Barbara Brande (Democrat) - 1975 to 1980 (Mayor in 1977)
  • Sandy Weeks (Democrat) - 1982 to 1984
  • Mary Lou Farmer (Democrat) - 1984 to 1986
  • Carolyn Vollero (Democrat) - 1988 to 1996 (Mayor in 1994, Deputy Mayor in 1993)
  • Barbara Bilger (Republican) - 1990 to 1992 and 2002 to 2004 (Mayor in 2002 & 2004, Deputy Mayor in 1992 & 2003)
  • Ann Darby (Republican) - 2003 to 2005 (Deputy Mayor in 2004)
  • Martha Garcia (Republican) - 2008 to 2010 (Deputy Mayor in 2010)
  • Lisa Adubato (Republican) - 2012 to present

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Cranford is located in the 7th Congressional District[38] and is part of New Jersey's 21st state legislative district.[11][39][40]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[41] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[42][43] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[44][45]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 21st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Thomas Kean, Jr. (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[46][47] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[48] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[49]

Union County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose nine members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis with three seats coming up for election each year, with an appointed County Manager overseeing the day-to-day operations of the county. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Chairman and Vice Chairman from among its members.[50] As of 2014, Union County's Freeholders are Chairman Christopher Hudak (D, Linden, term ends December 31, 2014),[51] Vice Chairman Mohamed S. Jalloh (D, Roselle, 2015),[52] Bruce Bergen (D, Springfield Township, 2015),[53] Linda Carter (D, Plainfield, 2016),[54] Angel G. Estrada (D, Elizabeth, 2014),[55] Sergio Granados (D, Elizabeth, 2016)[56] Bette Jane Kowalski (D, Cranford, 2016),[57] Alexander Mirabella (D, Fanwood, 2015)[58] and Vernell Wright (D, Union, 2014).[59][60] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi (D, Union, 2015),[61] Sheriff Ralph Froehlich (D, Union, 2016)[62] and Surrogate James S. LaCorte (D, Springfield Township, 2014).[63][64] The County Manager is Alfred Faella.[65] Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski is a Cranford resident.

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 15,649 registered voters in Cranford Township, of which 4,887 (31.2% vs. 41.8% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 3,701 (23.7% vs. 15.3%) were registered as Republicans and 7,046 (45.0% vs. 42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 15 voters registered to other parties.[66] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 69.2% (vs. 53.3% in Union County) were registered to vote, including 91.2% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.6% countywide).[66][67]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 6,236 votes here (51.0% vs. 66.0% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 5,772 votes (47.2% vs. 32.3%) and other candidates with 141 votes (1.2% vs. 0.8%), among the 12,223 ballots cast by the township's 16,332 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.8% (vs. 68.8% in Union County).[68][69] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 6,513 votes here (49.6% vs. 63.1% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 6,371 votes (48.6% vs. 35.2%) and other candidates with 164 votes (1.3% vs. 0.9%), among the 13,120 ballots cast by the township's 16,145 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.3% (vs. 74.7% in Union County).[70] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 6,455 votes here (50.4% vs. 40.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 6,160 votes (48.1% vs. 58.3%) and other candidates with 111 votes (0.9% vs. 0.7%), among the 12,795 ballots cast by the township's 15,822 registered voters, for a turnout of 80.9% (vs. 72.3% in the whole county).[71]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 4,787 votes here (52.3% vs. 41.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 3,421 votes (37.4% vs. 50.6%), Independent Chris Daggett with 793 votes (8.7% vs. 5.9%) and other candidates with 82 votes (0.9% vs. 0.8%), among the 9,146 ballots cast by the township's 15,871 registered voters, yielding a 57.6% turnout (vs. 46.5% in the county).[72]

Education[edit]

Tree in Nomahegan park across from Union County College.
Nomahegan park.

The Cranford Township Public Schools are a comprehensive public school system, which is governed by a nine-person elected Board of education. The district's high school, Cranford High School was ranked 51st among 328 public high schools in New Jersey in 2012 by New Jersey Monthly magazine after being ranked 13th in 2010[73] and has won a series of national and statewide awards for its innovative curriculum.

Schools in the district (with 2010-11 from the National Center for Education Statistics[74]) are Bloomingdale Avenue School[75] (241 students in grades K-2), Brookside Place School[76] (432; K-5), Hillside Avenue School[77] (768; K-8), Livingston Avenue School[78] (227; 3-5), Orange Avenue School[79] (774; 3-8), Walnut Avenue School[80] (309; PreK-2) and Cranford High School[81] (1,139; 9-12).[82] Cranford High School has a curriculum which has a strong push for technology in the schools, along with stressing service learning. The high school is recognized for its work in service learning and for being a national school of character. Cranford High School students are regularly admitted to some of the nation's top private and public universities, with over 90% of each graduating class going onto college. Lincoln School, which is the home of the district's administrative offices, also houses the district's two alternative education programs, CAP and CAMP.[83]

Cranford houses several religious and private schools. Saint Michael's School, located in downtown Cranford, is a Roman Catholic parochial school which serves students in Nursery through Grade 8 and is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Elementary Schools, operating under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[84][85]

The main campus of Union County College, New Jersey's oldest community college dating back to 1933, is located in Cranford.[86] The Cranford campus, one of four county locations, was established in 1956.

Historic sites[edit]

The Cranford Historical Preservation Advisory Board was established in 1993 to record and help preserve historic buildings in the town. A modernist branch office for IBM was constructed in Cranford according to designs by architect Victor Lundy.

Local media[edit]

Cranford TV-35 public access logo

Cranford has long been a newspaper community. The Cranford Chronicle (formerly the Cranford Citizen & Chronicle) is a longtime newspaper serving the Township. Owned by the Ray Family and published in town, the Chronicle served as the center of community journalism. Stu Awbrey purchased the Chronicle and continued as the town's newspaperman. Awbrey sold the paper to Malcolm Forbes, whose publishing company published the paper for several years before the paper changed hands to other community newspaper publication companies. The Chronicle's office left Cranford for Somerville and later Clark. The Chronicle now also features coverage of Garwood and Kenilworth.

The Cranford Eagle started publishing in 1999 as another community newspaper. Owned by Worrall Community Newspapers, the Eagle focused solely on Cranford and other neighboring towns. Edited and reported by several people in its history, the Eagle quickly became a fixture in the community. The Eagle's sports page is shared with the Clark newspaper, published by the same company.

Cranford Patch is a daily online news source dedicated strictly to local Cranford news.

Cranford also has its own channel, TV-35, which is available to cable and Verizon FiOS television subscribers. The channel was founded in 1986.[87]

The township operates a low-power AM radio station at 680 kHz. The station provides information during emergencies in the township.

Cranford.com is the official website of the Township of Cranford, and has been in operation since the summer of 1996.

Transportation[edit]

The Cranford station is to the lower right and offers commuter service to Newark and elsewhere.

The Cranford station offers service on the New Jersey Transit Raritan Valley Line, formerly the mainline of the Central Railroad of New Jersey.

NJ Transit also provides bus service on the 112 and 113 routes between Cranford and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York City and on the 59 and 66 to Newark. The 56, 57 and 58 routes provide local service.[88]

Newark Liberty International Airport is approximately 13 minutes away in Newark/Elizabeth. Linden Airport, a general aviation facility, is in nearby Linden, New Jersey.

The southern section of the township is bisected by Conrail's freight-only Lehigh Line (jointly owned by CSX and Norfolk Southern) along the tracks of the former Lehigh Valley Railroad. The former Staten Island Railway connects with the Raritan Valley Line in Cranford. That line has been rehabilitated but is not used except for track machines to be parked on it near the NJT line.

The Garden State Parkway passes through Cranford, with access at Exit 136 for County Route 607 and Exit 137 for Route 28. Exit 136 is known as the "four corners", where Clark, Winfield, Cranford and Linden meet.

In film and television[edit]

  • All Episodes of Pete and Pete Filmed at a house were filmed at 11 Willow Street in Cranford.
  • Several Episodes of Pete and Pete Filmed in Cranford Featured Cranford's own Michael-Anne Regan of 15 Willow Street.

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Cranford include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Township Committee, Township of Cranford. Accessed May 5, 2013.
  5. ^ Township Administrator, Township of Cranford. Accessed May 5, 2013.
  6. ^ Township Clerk, Township of Cranford. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 94.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Cranford, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b 2010 Populations: Union County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed January 22, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Cranford township, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Cranford township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  13. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  14. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Cranford, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  16. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 3, 2013.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Cranford, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 3, 2013.
  18. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  20. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  22. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 237. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  23. ^ "Best Places To Live - The Complete Top Towns List 1-100", New Jersey Monthly, February 21, 2008. Accessed 26 December 2008.
  24. ^ Climate Summary for Cranford, New Jersey
  25. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905 : together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed May 5, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Cranford township, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Cranford township, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 16, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Cranford township, Union County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 17, 2012.
  33. ^ Walsh, Jeremy. "Committee favors widening Cranford's special improvement district", The Star-Ledger, April 29, 2010. Accessed July 17, 2012. "When the special district was established in 1985 to help make streetscape improvements downtown, it was the first such district in New Jersey."
  34. ^ Police Department, Township of Cranford. Accessed April 12, 2014.
  35. ^ Union County General Election November 2, 2010, Union County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed May 5, 2013.
  36. ^ Union County 2011 General, November 8, 2011, Union County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed May 5, 2013.
  37. ^ Union Co 2012 General/School Election November 6, 2012, Union County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed May 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 56, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  42. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  43. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  44. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  46. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  47. ^ District 21 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  48. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ County Government, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  51. ^ Freeholder Christopher Hudak, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  52. ^ Freeholder Mohamed S. Jalloh, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  53. ^ Bruce Bergen, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  54. ^ Freeholder Vice Chairman Linda Carter, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  55. ^ Freeholder Angel G. Estrada, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  56. ^ Freeholder Sergio Granados, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
  57. ^ Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski, Union County, New Jersey. Accessed January 26, 2014.
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