English-based creole languages

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An English-based creole language (often shortened to English creole) is a creole language derived from the English language. Most English creoles were formed in British colonies, following the great expansion of British naval military power and trade in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries.

Origin[edit]

It is disputed to what extent the various English-based creoles of the world share a common origin. The monogenesis hypothesis (Hancock 1969, Gilman 1978) posits that a single language, commonly called proto–Pidgin English, spoken along the West African coast in the early sixteenth century, was ancestral to most or all of the Atlantic creoles (the English creoles of both West Africa and the Americas).

A Ndyuka letter written in the Afaka syllabary

List[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]