Crescentinus

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Saint Crescentinus
Saint crescentinus mattrowe.JPG
Statue of Saint Crescentinus being paraded on the streets of Urbino, on his feast day
Died ~303 AD
Honored in Roman Catholic Church
Major shrine Urbino
Feast June 1
Attributes Military attire; depicted slaying dragon
Patronage Urbino; Città di Castello; invoked against headache

Saint Crescentinus (Italian: San Crescentino, Crescenziano) (died June 1, 303) is the patron saint of Urbino whose feast day is celebrated on June 1. Venerated as a warrior saint, he is sometimes depicted on horseback, killing a dragon, in the same manner as Saint George. However, as Martin Davies writes, "S. Crescentino’s story, so far as I am aware, excludes a Princess or other female victim."[1]

The coin known as the armellino (and popularly as the volpetta) issued by the duke of Urbino, Francesco Maria I della Rovere, featured Saint Crescentinus on horseback.[2]

Legend[edit]

Crescentinus is traditionally said to have been a Roman soldier who converted to Christianity. To escape the persecutions of Diocletian, he fled to Umbria, and found refuge at Thifernum Tiberinum (the present-day Città di Castello). His defeat of a dragon led to a successful evangelization of the region together with his companions. His mission was confined particularly to the Tiber valley and the ancient Thifernum Tiberinum. He was subsequently beheaded.

Veneration[edit]

Blessed Mainard (Mainardo), bishop of Urbino, wishing to enrich its cathedral, brought the saint's relics to the city in 1068.[1]

He is still venerated at Urbino, and on Saint Crescentinus' Day, a statue of the saint is carried through the streets. A ceremony practiced involves tapping a worshipper's head with Crescentinus' relics to free the supplicant from headache.[2]

Gallery[edit]

External links[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Martin Davies, "Uccello's 'St George' in London," Burlington Magazine, Vol. 101, No. 678/679 (Sep. - Oct., 1959), pp. 308-315
  2. ^ it:Monete italiane medioevali

Further reading[edit]

Information about this saint may be found in the Acta Sanctorum, as well as in Angelo Conti, Fiori Vaghi delle Vite dei Santi e Beati delle Chiese, e Reliquie della Città di Castello (1627), pp-45ff.