Crime in Vietnam

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Police motorcycle in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, photographed in June 2005

Crime is present in various forms in Vietnam.

Crimes against foreigners in Vietnam[edit]

Petty crime, which includes pick-pocketing and snatch theft, is a problem in Vietnam. Traveling alone in remote areas after dark is of risk especially to foreigners. Violent crime is a growing issue; most cases of it are reported in the more developed areas of the country, such as Hanoi. Scams are common in the country, and foreign travellers have reported getting raped on fake motorcycle taxis (xe oms) passed off as real ones. Confidence tricks are a fair sight in the country; often do foreigners receive invitations to somebody else's residence to have a "casual game", which then escalates into a high-stakes match. Counterfeit and pirated merchandise can be easily found in many areas of Vietnam.[1]

Crimes against women in Vietnam[edit]

Prostitution is against the law in Vietnam. Nevertheless, many women in the country are prostitutes, either willingly or unwillingly. As many females in the country are stricken with poverty, selling their body is deemed as one of, if not the only, the alternatives they can take.[2] One source estimates the number of prostitutes in Vietnam to be 20,000 to 70,000.[3]

Corruption and police misconduct[edit]

The Vietnamese government is making an effort to curb corruption in the country. A handful of corrupt individuals, ranging from law enforcers to politicians, have been arrested.[4] The police force in Vietnam is known to go overboard and there have been reports of the police assaulting unarmed individuals. In July 23, while in detainment for a small offense (helmetless driving of motorcycle), 21-year-old Nguyen Van Khuong ultimately lost his life when officers reportedly physically attacked him.[5] The misuse of ferocity has raised concerns from the Human Rights Watch.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Vietnam". travel.state.gov. Retrieved June 13, 2013. 
  2. ^ U.S. Department of State (2009-02-25). "2008 Human Rights Reports: Vietnam". State.gov. Retrieved 2011-10-15. 
  3. ^ "Vietnam". Child-hood.com. 1990-02-28. Retrieved 2011-10-15. 
  4. ^ Coonan, Clifford (February 26, 2013). "Vietnam has fight on its hands with corruption". Irish Times. 
  5. ^ a b "Police brutality in Vietnam 'systemic and widespread'". BBC News. September 23, 2010.