Croats in New Zealand

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Croatian-New Zealander
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Total population
2,550[1] - 100,000(est.)[2]
Languages
New Zealand English, Croatian
Religion
Christianity

Croatian New Zealanders refer to New Zealand citizens of Croatian descent. There are 2,550 people who declared their nationality as Croats in the 2006 New Zealand census.[3] The majority of these are located primarily in and around Auckland and Northland with small numbers in and around Canterbury and Southland.[4] It is estimated that over 100,000 people have Croatian ancestry.[5]

History[edit]

The earliest Croatian settlers in New Zealand date from the 1860s, largely arriving as sailors, gold miners, prospectors and pioneers. Following this, five significant influxes of Croats have arrived:[6]

  • 5,000 between 1890 and 1914, prior to World War I.
  • 1,600 during the 1920s before the onset of the Great Depression.
  • 600 in the 1930s, prior to World War II.
  • 3,200 between 1945 and 1970.
  • Arrivals during the 1990s, fleeing the conflict in former Yugoslavia.

In July 2008, 800 people attended a celebration of 150 years of Croatian settlement in New Zealand hosted by Prime Minister Helen Clark and Ethnic Affairs Minister Chris Carter.[7]

Literature[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Encyclopedia of New Zealand - Story: Dalmatians". Retrieved 2013-04-13. 
  2. ^ "Carter: NZ Celebrates 150 Years Of Kiwi-Croatian Culture". Voxy. Digital Advance Limited. July 30, 2008. Retrieved 2012-03-20. 
  3. ^ "The Encyclopedia of New Zealand - Story: Dalmatians". Retrieved 2013-04-13. 
  4. ^ From Distant Villages: the lives and times of Croatian settlers in New Zealand, 1858-1958
  5. ^ "Carter: NZ Celebrates 150 Years Of Kiwi-Croatian Culture". Voxy. Digital Advance Limited. July 30, 2008. Retrieved 2012-03-20. 
  6. ^ "Book & Print in New Zealand : A Guide to Print Culture in Aotearoa". Retrieved 2009-08-13. 
  7. ^ "Carter: NZ Celebrates 150 Years Of Kiwi-Croatian Culture". Voxy. Digital Advance Limited. July 30, 2008. Retrieved 2012-03-20. 

See also[edit]