Cross Lake First Nation

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Cross Lake First Nation (Cree: Pimicikamāk Nīhithawī "Cree of the Lake that lies Athwart" or Nikikonakos "Otter People") is a band of Cree First Nations people in Canada governed under the Indian Act.[1] Its members[2] occupy several reserves within the town of Cross Lake situated on the east shore of Cross Lake in the province of Manitoba. In October, 2008, its recorded registered membership[3] was 6,969, of which 4,953 people of this First Nation lived on their reserve. Cross Lake is the principal community of the Pimicikamak indigenous people that made treaty with the British Crown in 1875.[4] Its indigenous language is Woods Cree. Cross Lake was the site of a residential school operated under Canada's assimilation policy. In 2008, Prime Minister Stephen Harper apologized for the damage caused by this policy.[5]

Governance[edit]

Under the Indian Act, Cross Lake First Nation has a municipal government with a Band Council. Since 1999, the Band Council is no longer elected under the Indian Act.[6] The Executive Council of Pimicikamak sits ex officio as the Council of the Band but continues to be the agent of the Minister of Indian Affairs for delivering programs to band members on reserve.

Chief and Council[edit]

Current Chief and Councillors were appointed on September 14, 2009, under the Custom Electoral System. In their council, quorum of 5 members is needed.

Chief
  • Chief Garrison W. Settee
    • Principle Spokesperson of the Nation
    • Primary Intergovernmental Affairs
    • Government Relations
    • International Relations
Council

Reserves[edit]

Cross Lake First Nation have reserved for themselves several tracts of land as their reserve holdings. Their largest reserve is the 2,037.10 hectares (5,033.8 acres) Cross Lake 19 Reserve. Associated with this reserve are:

Community[edit]

Cross Lake, Manitoba is the principal community for the Cross Lake First Nation. Other major communities for the First Nation are:

Child protection[edit]

Cross Lake was the site of a residential school operated under Canada's aboriginal assimilation policy. In 2008, Prime Minister Stephen Harper apologized for the "profoundly negative" consequences of this policy.[7] Cross Lake First Nation is a member of Awasis Agency[8] for aboriginal child protection on reserve.[9]

Highway connection[edit]

Cross Lake is the only community in north-eastern Manitoba that is connected to the North American highway system by all-weather road via the C$24 M Kichi Sipi Bridge, which the Province of Manitoba built after losing a lawsuit[10]

Kichi Sipi Bridge.

Education[edit]

The Cross Lake Education Authority is legally part of the Cross Lake First Nation but is operated by an independent elected Board. It runs two schools on the Cross Lake First Nation's reserves. Otter Nelson River School is a Sr. 1-4 High School and also an Elementary school (N-4). Mikisew Middle School is a school with grades 5-8.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ R.S., 1985, c. I-5, (Can.), http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/showtdm/cs/I-5
  2. ^ R.S., 1985, c. I-5, s. 7: "There shall be maintained in accordance with this Act for each band a Band List in which shall be entered the name of every person who is a member of that band."
  3. ^ R.S., 1985, c. I-5, s. 7: "There shall be maintained in accordance with this Act for each band a Band List in which shall be entered the name of every person who is a member of that band."
  4. ^ See official text in Alexander Morris, The Treaties of Canada with the Indians, Belfords, Clarke & Co., Toronto (1880); also at Queen's Printer, http://www.ainc-inac.gc.ca/pr/trts/trty5_e.html.
  5. ^ Hansard, Wednesday, June 11, 2008, "Apology to Former Students of Indian Residential Schools", http://www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=3568890&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=39&Ses=2, accessed 1 August 2008.
  6. ^ The Pimicikamak Election Law, 1999, s. 26, http://www.pimicikamak.ca/law/LAWoELEf_cor.DOC, accessed 31 July 2008.
  7. ^ Hansard, Wednesday, June 11, 2008, "Apology to Former Students of Indian Residential Schools", http://www2.parl.gc.ca/HousePublications/Publication.aspx?DocId=3568890&Language=E&Mode=1&Parl=39&Ses=2, accessed 1 August 2008.
  8. ^ See: http://www.gov.mb.ca/chc/rrs/stop_child_abuse.pdf
  9. ^ See also, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/mb/detachments/crosslake_e.htm
  10. ^ http://www.nfa-arb.org/download?id=107, accessed 5 September 2008./

External links[edit]