Crossroads Centre

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For other uses, see Crossroads (disambiguation).
Crossroads Centre
Geography
Location Antigua, Caribbean islands
Organisation
Patron Eric Clapton
Richard Conte

The Crossroads Centre is a drug and alcohol addiction rehabilitation centre located on the Caribbean island of Antigua.

History[edit]

The centre was founded by guitarist Eric Clapton & Richard Conte, CEO of The Priory Hospitals Group (London) and Transitional Hospitals Corporation (Nevada). All development of the facility was performed by officers and employees of these 2 companies. Conte & Clapton served as the Centre's first two board members with Conte being chairman. Transitional put up all working capital during the development phase and the facility was initially owned 2/3 by Transitional and 1/3 by Clapton. Former prime minister Lester Bird of Antigua was integrally involved by Transitional and arranged for the government of Antigua's assistance with roads, utilities and a favourable land purchase price. Conte's wife is credited with naming the facility and his associate Lester Keizer of Transitional was the 'point man' on the project.

Location/Description[edit]

The Crossroads Centre is located in the heart of the West Indies on the Caribbean island of Antigua.[1] It is a drug and alcohol treatment center which has the capacity to house its 36-bed design.[2] Experienced and internationally recognized professionals staff the Centre. Clapton writes “My vision was to create a Centre of the highest caliber to treat the people of the Caribbean and throughout the world” in a letter on the Crossroads Centre’s website. His vision becomes reality in 1998 when Crossroads opened its doors to the world for the first time. Since then it has rapidly evolved into a treatment center recognized internationally for its excellence, providing care to individuals that are suffering from the devastating effects of drug and alcohol addiction.[3]

Treatment[edit]

The clinic follows a therapeutic 12-step approach that is modeled after the Betty Ford Center and Alcoholics Anonymous.[4] The 12-steps are not an antidote for addiction, but are the guidelines for total personality transformation and spiritual remedy.[5] Crossroads utilizes effective therapies that address addiction and recovery in combination with the spiritual serenity of Antigua.[6] Individuals in a healing and serene atmosphere participate in the structured residential program that allows them to experience a whole person wellness approach to their recovery.[7]

Why Antigua?[edit]

The island of Antigua for nearly twenty years served as Eric Clapton’s refuge from his drug-induced rock stardom.[8] Mr. Clapton thought of the island as a safe and serene place where he could begin the process of healing from very devastating life events and situations.[9] He writes in his 2007 autobiography “It really has been one of the only places on earth I’ve found where I can completely discard the pressures of my life and blend into the landscape.”[10] London-born Clapton calls the land of Antigua his second home.[11]

Giving Back[edit]

Antiguans have seen Mr. Clapton transform from addict to advocate of possibly the next Betty Ford of the century.[12] They embraced him over two decades giving him privacy and peace. Hans Smit, an Antiguan philanthropist and jeweler said Crossroads is the only drug rehabilitation program on the island of 80,000 people.[13] At a time when drug trafficking and addiction rates are soaring in the Caribbean, the facility will treat locals for almost nothing.[14] Clapton’s target is to have one-third of the beds reserved for the Caribbean island people, but particularly Antiguans, because Eric loves Antiguans. “Now Clapton is repaying Antigua for its kindness—and sacrificing some of his treasured privacy,” says Mark Fineman in his 1998 LA Times article Clapton’s New Riff: Rehab ‘Robin Hood’ of Antigua.[15]


References[edit]

crossroadsantigua.org

  1. ^ “History of Crossroads Centre, Antigua” Crossroads Antigua.org. Crossroads Centre Antigua.
  2. ^ Angeles Times, 29 March 1998. Fineman, Mark. “Clapton’s New Riff: Rehab ‘Robin Hood ‘of Antigua” Las Angeles Times. La
  3. ^ “History of Crossroads Centre, Antigua” Crossroads Antigua.org. Crossroads Centre Antigua.
  4. ^ “History of Crossroads Centre, Antigua” Crossroads Antigua.org. Crossroads Centre Antigua.
  5. ^ Lancer, Darlene. “Recovery Using 12 Steps” Psych Central. Psych Central
  6. ^ “History of Crossroads Centre, Antigua” Crossroads Antigua.org. Crossroads Centre Antigua.
  7. ^ “History of Crossroads Centre, Antigua” Crossroads Antigua.org. Crossroads Centre Antigua.
  8. ^ Angeles Times, 29 March 1998. Fineman, Mark. “Clapton’s New Riff: Rehab ‘Robin Hood ‘of Antigua” Las Angeles Times. La
  9. ^ “History of Crossroads Centre, Antigua” Crossroads Antigua.org. Crossroads Centre Antigua.
  10. ^ Clapton, Eric. Clapton the Autobiography. Broadway Books: 2007 Print.
  11. ^ Angeles Times, 29 March 1998. Fineman, Mark. “Clapton’s New Riff: Rehab ‘Robin Hood ‘of Antigua” Las Angeles Times. La
  12. ^ Angeles Times, 29 March 1998. Fineman, Mark. “Clapton’s New Riff: Rehab ‘Robin Hood ‘of Antigua” Las Angeles Times. La
  13. ^ McKinley, James. “Aiding Sobriety, a Chord at a Time” New York Times. New York Times, 11 April 2013
  14. ^ Angeles Times, 29 March 1998. Fineman, Mark. “Clapton’s New Riff: Rehab ‘Robin Hood ‘of Antigua” Las Angeles Times. La
  15. ^ Angeles Times, 29 March 1998. Fineman, Mark. “Clapton’s New Riff: Rehab ‘Robin Hood ‘of Antigua” Las Angeles Times. La

See also[edit]

External links[edit]