Crotonic acid

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Crotonic acid
Skeletal formula of crotonic acid
Ball-and-stick model of the crotonic acid molecule
Names
IUPAC name
(E)-but-2-enoic acid
Other names
trans-2-butenoic acid
beta-methylacrylic acid
3-methylacrylic acid
(E)-2-butenoic acid
Identifiers
107-93-7 N
ChEBI CHEBI:41131 YesY
ChEMBL ChEMBL1213528 YesY
ChemSpider 552744 YesY
DrugBank DB02074 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image
Image
PubChem 637090
Properties
C4H6O2
Molar mass 86.09 g/mol
Density 1.02 g/cm3
Melting point 70 to 73 °C (158 to 163 °F; 343 to 346 K)
Boiling point 185 to 189 °C (365 to 372 °F; 458 to 462 K)
Acidity (pKa) 4.69 [1]
Hazards
MSDS SIRI.org
Related compounds
Other anions
crotonate
propionic acid
acrylic acid
butyric acid
succinic acid
malic acid
tartaric acid
fumaric acid
pentanoic acid
Related compounds
butanol
butyraldehyde
crotonaldehyde
2-butanone
Except where noted otherwise, data is given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
 N verify (what isYesY/N?)
Infobox references

Crotonic acid, or trans-2-butenoic acid, is a short-chain unsaturated carboxylic acid, described by the formula CH3CH=CHCO2H. Crotonic acid is so named because it was erroneously thought to be a saponification product of croton oil.[citation needed] It crystallizes as needles from hot water.

Racemic threonine can be prepared from crotonic acid by alpha-functionalization using mercury(II) acetate.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dawson, R. M. C., et al., Data for Biochemical Research, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1959.
  2. ^ Carter, H. E.; West, H. D. (1955). "dl-Threonine". Org. Synth. ; Coll. Vol. 3, p. 813 

Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.