Cruden Bay Hotel Tramway

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Cruden Bay Hotel Tramway
Cruden Bay Hotel Tramway.jpg
Map of the route of the Cruden Bay Hotel Tramway. The railway station was at the north end of the route, and the hotel at the south.
Operation
Locale Cruden Bay
Open 1 June 1899
Close 31 December 1940
Status Closed
Infrastructure
Track gauge 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm)
Propulsion system(s) Electric
Electrification 500 volts
Depot(s) Cruden Bay Hotel
Statistics
Route length 0.3 miles (0.48 km)

The Cruden Bay Hotel Tramway operated an electric tramway service between the Cruden Bay Hotel and Cruden Bay railway station between 1899 and 1940.[1]

History[edit]

The Cruden Bay Hotel tramway was built to connect Cruden Bay railway station with the Cruden Bay Hotel. It was constructed by the Great North of Scotland Railway which owned the hotel. Two tramcars were provided and built by the Great North of Scotland Railway at Kittybrewster,[2] in a purple lake and cream livery with "Cruden Bay Hotel" on the rocker panel.

It was the most northerly tramway service in the United Kingdom.

Closure[edit]

Passenger services were terminated on 1 November 1932, when passenger rail services were suspended along the Boddam Branch line to Cruden Bay railway station, and hotel guests were offered a motor car service direct to Aberdeen railway station. The tram continued for delivery of supplies and laundry to and from the railway which remained open to freight.

The hotel was requisitioned in 1940 as a Field Training Centre for the Gordon Highlanders. The tram ceased operation on 31 December 1940. The hotel never re-opened after the war and was sold for demolition in July 1947.

The tramcars were used as a summer house and shed until 1988 when they were recovered and the best of both was used to create a single car for preservation at the Grampian Transport Museum.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Golden Age of Tramways. Published by Taylor and Francis.
  2. ^ Lambert's Railway Miscellany, Anthony Lambert, Random House, 2010

Coordinates: 57°24′58″N 1°51′52″W / 57.4162°N 1.8645°W / 57.4162; -1.8645