Cub Foods

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Cub Foods, Inc.
Type Subsidiary
Industry Retail, Grocery
Founded 1968 in Minneapolis, Minnesota
Headquarters Stillwater, Minnesota
Number of locations 73
Products Bakery, dairy, deli, frozen foods, grocery, meat, pharmacy, produce, seafood, snacks, liquor
Parent SuperValu
Website cub.com

Cub Foods is a supermarket chain with seventy-three stores in Minnesota and Illinois.[1] The company is a wholly owned subsidiary of Eden Prairie, Minnesota-based SuperValu Inc. The store was famous for being “no frills; sack your own groceries ...”

History[edit]

Beginnings[edit]

Cub Foods was founded by Minnesota-based Hooleys Supermarkets in 1968 in the riverside city of Stillwater by brothers, Charles and Jack Hooley, brother-in-law Robert Thueson, and Culver Davis jr. The name “CUB” originally stood for Consumers United for Buying, and Cub Foods was one of the first total discount food stores in the United States[1] The chain was bought by Minnesota-based SuperValu in 1980 with five stores in the Twin Cities. After the purchase, the chain expanded to 83 stores, in three states. Until 1999, WinCo Foods operated several Cub Foods stores. Cub Foods also operated eight stores in Colorado until 2003 when they sold most of their stores to Kroger. The chain also had locations operated by Delhaize Group in parts of the Southern United States, namely in the Atlanta and Nashville areas in the 1980s and 90s.[2]

Cub Foods operated two stores in Columbus, Ohio: 3600 Soldano Boulevard (W. Broad & Wilson Road) and Columbus Square (SR 161 and Forest Hills Boulevard). On May 23, 1997, both stores and its employees were acquired by Kroger. The Kroger at Columbus Square closed in July 2011.[3][4]

Cub Foods also had a joint venture with a local grocer Mike Lofino in the Dayton, Ohio, market, which operated four stores under the Cub Foods banner. SuperValu sold off its share of the venture in 1995, although three stores continued to use the Cub Foods name for well over a decade under a franchise agreement with Mike Lofino and SuperValu. In 2007 the Huber Heights, Ohio location closed and on September 30, 2012 Lofino closed the Centerville, Ohio and Miami Twp. Locations. The Trotwood, Ohio location closed in 2013. Lofino still owns several Save-A-Lots around the country and Lofino's Marketplace in Beavercreek which is supplied through SuperValu.

Cub Foods is credited with many innovations, such as the first grocery check out conveyor belt system.

Effects from Albertsons merger[edit]

As part of SuperValu's acquisition of New Albertsons, including its Chicago-based Jewel-Osco stores, SuperValu divested its Chicago-area Cub Foods locations to an investment group headed by Cerberus Capital Management, to avoid market concentration issues. (The Cerberus-led group would later acquire New Albertsons from SuperValu in March 2013, reuniting the two Albertsons companies under the common holding company Albertsons LLC.) Since Cerberus took control, four locations (Algonquin, Bedford Park, 87th Street in Chicago, and Naperville) closed, and Cerberus then announced that it was selling the remaining Illinois stores to other operators.[5] The last of the Chicago area Cub Foods stores closed on December 10, 2006. A majority of them were sold to Central Grocers Cooperative and are operated as Strack & Van Til and Ultra Foods by a wholly owned unit of the cooperative, and as Garden Fresh Markets by one of its members;[6] others were sold to Grand Mart International Foods. However, only four of the eight stores sold to Grand Mart ever opened under that company's ownership, and all were closed after less than five months of operation.

As of June 2009, the only remaining Cub Foods stores in Illinois which are still owned by SuperValu are one store in Peoria (a second store in Midtown Plaza in Peoria closed in March 2009 after just six-and-a-half years of operation) and one store in Freeport.

On October 9, 2010, the Cub Foods in Peoria, still owned and operated by SuperValu, changed its name to Shop 'n Save. This made the Freeport store the only remaining SuperValu-owned store in Illinois to continue to operate as a Cub Foods location.

Three Springfield, Illinois stores independently owned by Niemann Foods (two of which are former Jewel-Osco stores acquired from the Cerberus-led group) had a franchise to use the Cub Foods name as part of the stores' branding. These stores also carried selected Cub Foods-branded products under the same agreement. As of recently, these three stores no longer use the Cub Foods name; instead, they are now called County Market. However, a Niemann-owned store in Bloomington, Illinois does use the Cub Foods name under license from SuperValu.

Former slogans[edit]

(Incomplete List)

  • "Cub Foods. A new way to run a supermarket."
  • "The Low Price Leader"
  • "Great Food, Great Prices"
  • "Save More, Get More"
  • "Where the Great Taste of Food Costs Less"
  • "I ♥ My Cub" (Made a brief return as a promotion for CUB's 40th birthday)
  • "The Store Next door" [5]
  • "Bring more to your table"
  • "Your Holiday List For Less" (2009 Holiday slogan for all Supervalu stores)
  • "The People You Trust, The Store You Know" (Cub Pharmacy slogan 2006-2009)
  • "Helping hands are just around the corner" (Cub Pharmacy slogan 2009-2010)
  • "Good Things Are Just Around The Corner..."
  • "Plenty Fresh For Plenty Less." (Cub Foods slogan 2010-2011)
  • "For People who Love to Save Money." Current Dayton Market Slogan
  • "My neighborhood. My Cub." (Current Cub Foods slogan)
  • "Better Fresh, Better Value"
  • "Fresh, or it's free."

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "SuperValu:Cub Foods Corporate Banner". 
  2. ^ "History". Delhaize Group. Retrieved 19 July 2012. 
  3. ^ "Kroger's Columbus Square store to close; county offices may fill gap". This Week. May 11, 2011. Retrieved August 31, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Kroger to close Columbus Square location". The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved August 31, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b "Topic Galleries". Chicago Tribune. 
  6. ^ Holecek, Andrea (2007). "Four Sterk's stores changing hands". NWI Times. 

External links[edit]