Cuisine of North Dakota

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The Cuisine of North Dakota differs from average Midwestern cuisine in a number of ways. Though much of the Midwest has strong German influences, North Dakota also has strong influence from Norway as well as the many ethnic Germans from Russia[1] who settled there. There is also a strong Native American influence on the cuisine of North Dakota.[2] [3]

As in the Midwest as a whole, meals are typically served in a smorgasbord format rather than in courses.[4]

Churches throughout the state commonly host annual fellowship dinners open to the community. Perhaps one of the largest authentic Norwegian dinners is the annual Lutefisk Dinner hosted by the First Lutheran Church, Williston, North Dakota, every February.

The largest Scandinavian Festival in North America is the annual Norsk Høstfest held every October, in Minot, North Dakota. This five-day cultural event features Scandinavian dishes (Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland and Iceland), but does accommodate those who are not fond of lutefisk by providing hundreds of choices of ethnic foods.[5]

Notable dishes[edit]

German influenced:

Scandinavian influenced:


References[edit]

  1. ^ Kloberdanz, Timothy J. "The German-Russians in North Dakota a Brief History". Germans From Russia Heritage Collection. North Dakota State University Libraries. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  2. ^ McMerty, Sandy. "Foods of North Dakota". Thoughts From a North Dakota Ambassador. Blog at WordPress.com. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  3. ^ North Dakota Guide. "Prairie Plates". North Dakota Food. Interactive Internet Websites, Inc. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  4. ^ Culinary Encyclopedia. "North Dakota Food". Culinary Encyclopedia by ifood.tv. Future Today Inc. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  5. ^ Helseth, Candi. "Three decades of Hostfest!". North Dakota Horizons Fall 2006. Clearwater Communications. Retrieved 12 January 2013.