Cultural conservatism

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Cultural conservatism is described as the preservation of the heritage of one nation, or of a shared culture that is not defined by national boundaries.[1][page needed] Other variants of cultural conservatism are concerned with culture attached to a given language such as Arabic.[citation needed]

The shared culture may be as divergent as Western culture or Chinese culture. In the United States, the term cultural conservative may imply a conservative position in the culture war. They believe strongly in traditional values and traditional politics, and often have an urgent sense of nationalism.

Cultural conservatism is distinct from social conservatism,[citation needed] although there are some overlaps. Social conservatives believe that the government has a role in encouraging or enforcing what they consider traditional values or behaviors. A social conservative wants to preserve traditional morality and social mores, often through civil law or regulation. Social change is generally regarded as suspect.

Ireland[edit]

In the Republic of Ireland prior to the 1980s and 1990s, cultural conservatism, in the form of support for the Irish language, Gaelic culture and Roman Catholicism, was a force of major political importance. It was associated in particular with the Fianna Fáil party.

United States[edit]

In the United States, cultural conservative has increasingly been used as a replacement for the terms Christian right or religious right. In the US, cultural conservative may imply a conservative position in the culture wars.

An example of a cultural conservative in the broader sense is Allan Bloom (who is a political liberal), arguing in The Closing of the American Mind against cultural relativism. Another example is Senator Jim Webb (D-Virginia), author of Born Fighting.

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • John J. Langdale III, Superfluous Southerners: Cultural Conservatism and the South, 1920-1990. Columbia, MO: University of Missouri Press, 2012.