Culver Academies

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Culver Military Academy / Culver Girls Academy
Culver C.jpg
Location
Culver, IN, USA
Coordinates 41°13′18″N 86°24′25″W / 41.22167°N 86.40694°W / 41.22167; -86.40694Coordinates: 41°13′18″N 86°24′25″W / 41.22167°N 86.40694°W / 41.22167; -86.40694
Information
Type Private, Boarding
Religious affiliation(s) none
Established 1894/1971
Head of Schools John Buxton
Faculty 87
Enrollment 855 winter
Average class size 13
Student to teacher ratio 8.5:1
Campus 1,850 acres (7.5 km2)
38 buildings
Color(s) Maroon and White
Mascot Eagles
Website

The Culver Academies are a group of elite and prestigious college preparatory boarding schools and summer camps located in Culver Indiana. The Culver Academies are composed of three entities: Culver Military Academy (CMA) for boys, Culver Girls Academy (CGA), and the Culver Summer Schools and Camps (CSSC). They are collectively known as The Culver Academies and are located in Culver Indiana.

Henry Harrison Culver first founded Culver Military Academy in 1894 "for the purpose of thoroughly preparing young men for the best colleges, scientific schools and businesses of America." Coeducational since 1971, Culver Girls Academy was founded for the purpose of encouraging young women to attain the highest degree of self-development. Culver Summer Schools and Camps consists of the Culver Summer Naval School (CSNS) for boys, Culver Summer School for Girls (CSSG), the Cavalry Troop program, the Aviation School, and the Woodcraft Camp. The summer schools began operations in 1902 and today bring over 1,300 campers from around the world to Culver to learn leadership skills that improve personal confidence.[citation needed]

A boarding school featuring a broad college preparatory curriculum with a focus on "educating its students for leadership and responsible citizenship in society by developing and nurturing the whole individual - minds, spirit, and body - through integrated programs that emphasize the cultivation of character." Culver is one of the largest boarding schools in the United States, with over 800 students, an endowment of over $380 million, and a total campus of more than 1,800 acres (7.3 km2). The campus has the Vaughn Equestrian Center with one of the country's largest indoor riding hall and stable complexes, the Roberts Hall of Science and Dicke Hall of Mathematics with 64,500 square feet (5,990 m2) of classroom space, the Huffington Library, and the Henderson Ice Arenas which provide facilities to four boys' and one girls' hockey teams, and the newly constructed Steinbrenner Performing Arts Center.[citation needed]

Athletics[edit]

Culver Military Academy and Culver Girls Academy have a rich sports tradition and offer a variety of athletic programs and sports teams. The hockey team has a long history of success,[1] and the boys' and girls' lacrosse teams have both recently won state tournaments. The boys' Varsity team won in 1999, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2007,& [3]2008 and the girls' team has won four times, in 2002, 2003,[4] 2004,[5] 2007, and 2008. Culver had state champions in golf, wrestling, cross country, and track, as well as the state softball player of the year. Culver was home to the 2006 Youth National Rowing Champion in the Men's Single Scull. CMA's Black Horse Troop is one of the nation's elite horsemanship groups for high school students and is usually invited to participate in the Presidential Inauguration Parade. The Black Horse Troop participated in the inaugural of the World Equestrian Games in Kentucky in 2010, the first time they occurred in the USA. Recently Culver's sailing team went to several national events. The Culver Academies Girls Soccer team is ranked 5th in the state (according to an ESPN poll), and made it to the State Finals in 2008. Culver is also considered one of the top fencing schools in the nation. In 2009, the boys' basketball team will be competing in the State Farm Holiday Classic basketball tournament in Bloomington-Normal, Illinois.[citation needed]

Facilities[edit]

Fields at the Academies, with buildings in the background

The Eugene C. Eppley Foundation donated the funds for three classroom buildings that comprise the Gignilliat Memorial Quadrangle. Eppley Auditorium, built in 1959, seats 1,492 people. The new Steinbrenner Performing Arts Center consists of a scene shop, dance studio, and private dance studio.[2][3][4][5]

The ethos of the Culver Academies was augmented with the dedication of the 47,000 sq. ft. Huffington Library on October 1, 1993. Physically, the building provides a southern terminus to the academic quadrangle while affording library patrons a scholarly atmosphere and idyllic view of Lake Maxinkuckee. It houses a collection of approximately 55,000 volumes and, with it, the latest in information technology.

Henderson Arena is home to Culver Military Academy and Culver Girls Academy hockey teams.

On October 5, 2012 Culver dedicated the White-Devries Rowing Center, a world class facility for the men's and women's crew teams.[6]

Eppley Auditorium in the winter.

Notable alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Taylor, R.M., Stevens, E.W. and Ponder, M.A. (1992) Indiana: A New Historical Guide. Indiana State Historical Society. p 563.
  3. ^ 1959 postcard. Retrieved 6/11/08.
  4. ^ 1960s postcard. Retrieved 6/11/08.
  5. ^ Dalstrom, H.A. "Eugene C. Eppley: His Life and Legacy." The Journal of American History 57:2 (1970): 468.
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ Matthew Reonas, Once Proud Princes: Planters and Plantation Culture in Louisiana's Northeast Delta, From the First World War Through the Great Depression, pp. 264, 271. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Ph.D. dissertation, December 2006. Retrieved July 19, 2013. 
  8. ^ "SPORTS PEOPLE: YACHT RACING; Don't Tell Dennis Conner", The New York Times, July 15, 1992. Accessed February 14, 2008. "The America's Cup defender, BILL KOCH, capsized a sailboat on Lake Maxinkuckee in Culver, Ind., last weekend while racing students at Culver Academy, where he graduated in the 1950's."
  9. ^ "Walter F. O'Malley, Leader of Dodgers' Move to Los Angeles, Dies at 75; Unqualified Success", The New York Times, August 10, 1979.
  10. ^ "Noteworthy Alumni" (accessed February 16, 2011).

External links[edit]