Cuneus Frisionum

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Housesteads latrines.jpg

Cuneus Frisionum or Frisiorum cuneus are the names of units of Frisian auxiliaries in the Roman army.

Two memorial stones in Housesteads, Hexham, England mention the name. They were engraved by Frisian soldiers from Twente (Tvihanti) in the 3rd century between 222 and 235, and are dedicated to Mars Thingsus.[1] They were discovered in 1883.[1] One is from a pillar shaped altar and the other from a smaller altar; they are engraved in pretty badly written Latin:

DEO MARTI ET DVABVS ALAISIAGIS ET N AVG GER CIVES TVIHANTI CVNEI FRISIORVM VER SER ALEXANDRIANI VOTVM SOLVERVNT LIBENTES M

and:

DEO MARTI THINCSO DVABVS ET ALAISAGIS BEDE ET FIMMILENE ET N AVG GERM CIVES TVIHANTI VSLM

They mean "To the god Mars and the two Alaisiagae, and to the divine power of the Emperor, the German tribesmen of Tuihantis of the formation of Frisians of Vercovicium, Severus Alexanders's own, willingly and deservedly fulfilled their vow." and "To the god Mars Thinescus and the two Alaisiagae, Beda and Fimmilena, and the divine power of the Emperor, Germans tribemen from Tuihantis willingly and deservedly fulfilled their vow."[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bremmer, Rolf Hendrik; Johnston, Thomas S. B.; Vries, Oebele (1998). Approaches to Old Frisian Philology. Rodopi. p. 158. ISBN 978-90-420-0651-5. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  2. ^ Attema, P. A. J.; Lanting, J. N.; Los-Weijns, M. A. (15 December 2008). Palaeohistoria 49/50 (2007/2008). Barkhuis. p. 701. ISBN 978-90-77922-44-6. Retrieved 13 December 2012.