Cupedidae

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Cupedidae
Tenomerga mucida01.jpg
Tenomerga mucida
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Coleoptera
Suborder: Archostemata
Family: Cupedidae
Laporte, 1836
Genera

Adinolepsis
Ascioplaga
Cupes
Distocupes
Paracupes
Priacma
Prolixocupes
Rhipsideigma
Tenomerga

Cupedidae is a small family of beetles, notable for the square pattern of "windows" on their elytra (hard forewings), which gives the family their common name of reticulated beetles.[1]

The family consists of about 30 species in nine genera, with a Pangean (worldwide) distribution. Many more extinct species are known, dating as far back as the Triassic.[1]

These beetles tend to be elongate with a parallel-sided body, ranging in length from 10 to 20 millimeters, with colors brownish, blackish, or gray. The larvae are wood-borers, typically living in fungus-infested wood, and sometimes found in wood construction.[1]

Males of Priacma serrata (western North America) are notable for being strongly attracted to common household bleach. This suggests that bleach is reminiscent of the female beetle's pheromones.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Evans, A. V. and J. N. Hogue. (2006). Field Guide to Beetles of California. University of California Press.

External links[edit]

Tree of Life