Curb Event Center

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Curb Event Center
WTN EVula 079.jpg
Location 2002 Belmont Boulevard
Nashville, TN 37212
Coordinates 36°7′56″N 86°47′40″W / 36.13222°N 86.79444°W / 36.13222; -86.79444Coordinates: 36°7′56″N 86°47′40″W / 36.13222°N 86.79444°W / 36.13222; -86.79444
Owner Belmont University
Operator Belmont University
Capacity 5,085
Surface Maple
Construction
Broke ground August, 2001
Opened September 8, 2003
Construction cost $47.4 million
($60.8 million in 2014 dollars[1])
Architect Earl Swenson Associates & Cannon Design
Structural engineer KSi Structural Engineers
Services engineer Littljohn Engineering Associates
General contractor Hardaway Construction Corp.
Tenants
Belmont Bruins (2003-present)

The Curb Event Center is a multipurpose arena on the campus of Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee.

The facility was completed in 2003. It is the home venue of Belmont's men's and women's basketball and volleyball teams and hosted the 2004 and 2005 Atlantic Sun Conference men's basketball tournaments. In June 2004 it hosted some of the junior and preliminary events of the U.S.Gymnastics Championships. It seats 5,085 people for sporting events and hundreds more for events such as concerts and graduations where much of the floor is available for seating. It also hosts the graduation of the seniors of several local schools, including East Literature Magnet, Antioch High School, John Overton Comprehensive High School and Ravenwood High School.

On April 10, 2006, the arena hosted the nationally televised CMT Music Awards for the first time and in September of 2011 featured special guest and keynote speaker Dr. Maya Angelou in celebration of its 10th Annual Humanities Symposium.

It is named in honor of its prime donor, music executive and former lieutenant governor of California Mike Curb. It replaced Striplin Gym.

Curb Event Center hosted one of three United States Presidential Debates in 2008.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–2014. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved February 27, 2014.

External links[edit]