Cy Denneny

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Cy Denneny
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1959
Cy Denneny.jpg
Born (1891-12-23)December 23, 1891
Farran's Point, ON, CAN
Died September 10, 1970(1970-09-10) (aged 78)
Ottawa, ON, CAN
Height 5 ft 7 in (170 cm)
Weight 168 lb (76 kg; 12 st 0 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for Toronto Shamrocks
Toronto Blueshirts
Ottawa Senators
Boston Bruins
Playing career 1914–1929

Cyril Joseph Denneny (December 23, 1891 – September 10, 1970) was a Canadian professional ice hockey forward who played for the Ottawa Senators and Boston Bruins in the National Hockey League and the Toronto Blueshirts of the National Hockey Association. His brother Corbett Denneny also played in the NHL.

Early life[edit]

Cy Denneny was born in Farran's Point, Ontario, near Cornwall, Ontario. He was the son of James Israel Denneny who was a top lacrosse player in the late 19th century and was descended from the Dennenys of County Monaghan, Ireland.[citation needed]

Playing career[edit]

Denneny played senior hockey in Cornwall, starting with the Cornwall Sons of England of the Lower Ottawa Valley hockey league in 1909–10. His professional playing career began with the Toronto Ontarios/Shamrocks of the National Hockey Association (NHA) in 1914. (The name of the team changed during the season) He had tried out for the Montreal Canadiens in 1912 but failed to make the team and he returned to senior hockey. He was traded to the Ottawa Senators in 1916 and he would play with the Senators until 1928. He was member of four Senators Stanley Cup-winning teams; in 1920, 1921, 1923 and 1927. With the Senators during the 1917–18 season, Denneny set an NHL record by opening the season with four straight multi-goal games. Though the record still stands, it was tied in 2013 by San Jose Sharks' forward Patrick Marleau.[1] Denneny was sold to Boston in 1928, where he would be the playing-coach of the Bruins' 1929 Stanley Cup-winner.

In 1929, Denneny retired to become an NHL on-ice official. In 1932, he re-joined the Senators as head coach, but the team was in decline due to financial difficulties which forced management to sell top players in order to survive. The team finished last and Denneny was not retained as coach.

Denneny was one of the top scorers in the NHL from 1917 through 1925. While leading the league in scoring during the 1923–24 NHL season, he did so by recording 22 goals and one assist for a total of 23 points, the lowest winning total in NHL history.[2] When he retired, he was the all-time top scorer in NHL history. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1959. In 1998, he was ranked number 62 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players. He remains the fastest player in NHL history to score 200 goals (181 GP). During a six week span in the 1920–21 NHL season, Cy and his brother Corbett (Toronto St. Patricks), each scored six goals during a game—a feat accomplished by only five other players in the history of the NHL.

Personal life[edit]

Denneny was married twice. His first wife Melvina died and Denneny remarried. He was the father of two daughters with his second wife Isobel. After Denneny retired from hockey, he worked for the Canadian federal government. He retired from civil service in 1959. He died on September 10, 1970 and is buried in Ottawa's Pinecrest Cemetery.[3]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1910–11 Cornwall Internationals LOVHA 8 4 0 4 0
1911–12 Cornwall Internationals LOVHA 8 9 0 9 16
1912–13 Russell Athletics LOVHA
1913–14 Cobalt O'Brien Mines CoMHL 9 12 0 12 8
1914–15 Russell H.C. LOVHA 3 3 0 3
1914–15 Toronto Shamrocks NHA 8 6 0 6 43
1915–16 Toronto Blueshirts NHA 24 24 4 28 57
1916–17 Ottawa Senators NHA 11 3 1 4 25 2 1 0 1 8
1917–18 Ottawa Senators NHL 20 36 10 46 80
1918–19 Ottawa Senators NHL 18 18 6 24 55 5 3 2 5 6
1919–20 Ottawa Senators NHL 24 16 6 22 31
Stanley Cup 5 0 2 2 3
1920–21 Ottawa Senators NHL 24 34 5 39 10 2 2 0 2 5
Stanley Cup 5 2 2 4 13
1921–22 Ottawa Senators NHL 22 27 12 39 20 2 2 0 2 4
1922–23 Ottawa Senators NHL 24 23 10 33 20 2 2 0 2 2
Stanley Cup 6 1 2 3 10
1923–24 Ottawa Senators NHL 22 22 1 23 10 2 2 0 2 2
1924–25 Ottawa Senators NHL 29 27 15 42 16
1925–26 Ottawa Senators NHL 36 24 12 36 18 2 0 0 0 4
1926–27 Ottawa Senators NHL 42 17 6 23 16 6 5 0 5 0
1927–28 Ottawa Senators NHL 44 3 0 3 12 2 0 0 0 0
1928–29 Boston Bruins NHL 23 1 2 3 2 2 0 0 0 0
NHA totals 42 33 4 37 117 2 1 0 1 8
NHL totals 328 248 85 333 290 25 16 2 18 23
Stanley Cup totals 16 3 6 9 26

NHL coaching record[edit]

Team Year Regular season Post season
G W L T Pts Division rank Result
Boston Bruins 1928-29 44 26 13 5 57 1st in American Won Stanley Cup
Ottawa Senators 1932-33 48 11 27 10 32 5th in Canadian Missed playoffs
NHL Total 92 37 40 15

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CANUCKS TRAVEL TO SAN JOSE TO FACE RED HOT SHARKS, MARLEAU http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/story/?id=414611
  2. ^ Dryden, Steve (2000). The Hockey News: Century Of Hockey. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart Ltd. p. 26. ISBN 0-7710-4179-9. 
  3. ^ "Hockey Hall of Famer dies at 78". Toronto Star. September 11, 1970. p. 15. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Babe Dye
NHL Scoring Champion
1924
Succeeded by
Babe Dye
Preceded by
Newsy Lalonde
Head Coach of the Ottawa Senators (Original Era)
1932–1933
Succeeded by
George Boucher
Preceded by
Eddie Gerard
Ottawa Senators captain
(Original Era)

1923-26
Succeeded by
Georges Boucher
Preceded by
Art Ross
Head coach of the Boston Bruins
1928-29
Succeeded by
Art Ross