Cyberpolitics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Cyberpolitics is a term widely employed across the world, largely by academics interested in analyzing its breadth and scope, of the use of the Internet for political activity. It embraces all forms of social software. It includes journalism, fundraising, blogging, volunteer recruitment, and organization building.

The campaign of Howard Dean, in which a previously little-known former Democratic governor of a small state emerged for a while as the front runner for the 2004 Democratic Presidential nomination on the strength of his campaign's skill in cyberpolitics, was a wake-up call to the American political establishments of political parties around the United States as to the importance of cyberpolitics as both a concept and as a series of organizational and communications strategies.[citation needed]

Books on American cyberpolitics[edit]

  • Kevin A. Hughes and John E. Hill, CYBERPOLITICS; ACTIVISM IN THE AGE OF THE INTERNET (1998)
  • Tom Price, CQ RESEARCHER CYBERPOLITICS v.14-32 (2004)
  • Ed Schwartz, HOW CITIZENS USE THE INTERNET (1997)
  • W.Van DeDunk,CYBERPROTEST:NEW PROTEST, NEW MEDIA, CITIZENS AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (2004)

Books on world cyberpolitics in English Language[edit]

Gustave Cardoso & Manuel Castelli, THE MEDIA IN THE NETWORK SOCIETY; BROWSING, NEWS, FILTERS, AND CITIZENSHIP (2007)

Books on world cyberpolitics in languages other than English[edit]

  • Andrea Manica, Cyberpolitics: Guida Ni Siti Politici Su Internet
  • Miriam Meckel, Cyberpolitics und Cyberpolity, Zur Virtualisierung Politischer Kommunikation
  • Carmen Beatriz Fernández, Ciberpolitica: Como Usamos Las Nuevas Herramientas en la Politica LatinoAmericana?, Konrad Adenauer Stittfung, Buenos Aires 2008

References[edit]

External links[edit]

World politics, English Language[edit]

World politics, languages other than English[edit]