Cynthia McClintock

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Cynthia McClintock is a professor at George Washington University and an author.[1][2] She serves on the Center for International Policy's board of directors. From 1994 - 1995 she was the president of the Latin American Studies Association. She is an expert on Peruvian relations with the U.S., Andean affairs, the drug trade, and the Tupac Amaru rebel group.[3][4][5]

McClintock received a B.A. from Harvard University and a Ph.D. from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her expertise is in Latin American politics, U.S. policy towards Latin America, and Peru.[1] She was a member of the Council of the American Political Science Association from 1998 - 2000 and served as Chair of its Comparative Democratization Section. She was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars from 2003 - 2005. [1]

She has received fellowships from the U.S. Institute of Peace, Fulbright, Social Science Research Council and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. She has testified before the Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere Affairs of the U.S. House of Representatives and has appeared on News Hour with Jim Lehrer, CNN International, CNN Spanish, National Public Radio, and the Diane Rehm Show.

Bibliography[edit]

  • With Fabián Vallas The United States and Peru: Cooperation — at a Cost Routledge, 2003 and Spanish edition, Instituto de Estudios Peruanos, 2005)
  • Revolutionary Movements in Latin America: El Salvador's FMLN and Peru's Shining Path U.S. Institute of Peace Press 1998
  • Peasant Cooperatives and Political Change in Peru Princeton University Press 1981
  • With Abraham F. Lowenthal The Peruvian Experiment Reconsidered Princeton University Press 1983 and Spanish edition, Instituto de Estudios Peruanos 1985



References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Cynthia McClintock George Washington University faculty page
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ National Public Radio December 18, 1996
  4. ^ Will Movement Survive Attack April 23, 1997 Miami Herald
  5. ^ Paru's Harvest of Instability and Terrorism Christian Science Monitor March 16, 1989