Cynthia Viteri

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This name uses Spanish naming customs: the first or paternal family name is Viteri and the second or maternal family name is Jiménez.
Cynthia Viteri
Member of the National Assembly for the National Constituency
Incumbent
Assumed office
14 May 2013
Member of the National Assembly for Guayas Province
In office
31 July 2009 – 13 May 2013
Member of the Constituent Assembly
In office
29 November 2007 – 25 October 2008
Member of the National Congress
In office
2003–2007
First Vice President of the National Congress
In office
2005 – April 2006
President Wilfrido Lucero
Member of the National Congress for Guayas Province
In office
1998–2003
Member of the National Constituent Assembly for Riobamba
In office
1997–1998
Personal details
Born (1965-11-19) 19 November 1965 (age 49)
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Political party Social Christian Party / Madera de Guerrero
Website cynthiaviteri.com

Cynthia Fernanda Viteri Jiménez de Villamar (born 19 November 1965 in Guayaquil) is an Ecuadorian advocate, journalist and politician. She was a candidate in the 2006 presidential elections of Ecuador and finished fifth. Between 1998 and 2007 she was a member of the National Congress. Since 2009 she has been a member of the National Assembly.

Early life[edit]

Viteri was born on 19 November 1965 in Guayaquil, her parents are José Viteri Peña and Leonor Jiménez Campuzano.[1]

Viteri went to the Colegio Inmaculada for her primary education and continued at the Indoamérica de Guayaquil.[1] She studied at the University of Guayaquil where she got her licentiate in social science and politics. She continued at the same university, obtaining a doctor's degree in jurisprudence.[2]

Career[edit]

Viteri was a newsreader at Telecentro. She went on to become public relations manager of Jaime Nebot.[1]

Political career[edit]

Viteri started her political career in 1997 when she was elected to the National Constituent Assembly for the Social Christian Party. After that congress finished in 1998 she was elected to the National Congress for Guayas Province. Her term ended in 2003. In the 2002 elections she was elected once more to the National Congress. Between 2005 and 2006 she was First Vice President of the National Congress. In that capacity she inaugurated Alfredo Palacio as President of Ecuador.[1]

On 15 October 2006, she took part in the Ecuadorian presidential election and got 525,728 votes, representing 9.63% of the total poll.[3]

Her term as member of Congress ended in 2007 when Rafael Correa called for a Constituent Assembly to replace the old Congress, that he deemed corrupt, and draft a new constitution. Viteri was elected to this Constituent Assembly.[4] The Constituent Assembly proposed a National Assembly to replace the National Congress, this was approved by the population in the Ecuadorian constitutional referendum, 2008.[2] In 2009 Viteri ran for the new National Assembly and was elected for Guayas Province.[5] Viteri was reelected to National Assembly in the Ecuadorian general election of 2013, this time earning a seat for the National Constituency. The assembly was installed on 14 May 2013.[6] After being elected Viteri became the longest serving legislator in Ecuador.[1]

Personal life[edit]

She is married to economist Joaquín Villamar. The couple has five children.[2] Viteri's mother was a candidate for Plurinational Unity of the Lefts for the National Assembly in 2013 but did not win a seat.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "De ser electa, Cynthia Viteri será la más antigua legisladora" (in Spanish). El Telégrafo. 5 February 2013. Retrieved 26 June 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c "Cynthia Viteri, datos personales" (in Spanish). Cynthia Viteri. Retrieved 26 June 2013. 
  3. ^ "Election Profile". IFES Election Guide. Retrieved 30 January 2010. 
  4. ^ "Elecciones Ecuador 2013 - Asambleístas - Cynthia Viteri" (in Spanish). El Universo. Retrieved 26 June 2013. 
  5. ^ "Afiche Oficial de Asambleístas (en funciones hasta mayo de 2013)" (in Spanish). National Assembly of Ecuador. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  6. ^ "137 asambleístas, 96 nuevos y 41 reelectos, se posesionarán este 14 de mayo, en Ecuador" (in Spanish). National Assembly of Ecuador. 13 May 2013. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 

External links[edit]