Czechoslovakia national football team

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Czechoslovakia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Association Československý fotbalový svaz/Československý futbalový zväz
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Most caps Zdeněk Nehoda (90)
Top scorer Antonín Puč (34)
Home stadium Various
FIFA code TCH
Highest Elo ranking 1 (May 24, 1924)
Lowest Elo ranking 29 (August 1985)
First colours
First international
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 7 - 0 Yugoslavia Kingdom of Yugoslavia
(Antwerp, Belgium; 28 August 1920)
Last International
 Belgium 0 - 0 RCS Czechoslovakia
(Brussels, Belgium; 17 November 1993)
Biggest win
Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia 8 - 0 Thailand 
(Mexico City, Mexico; 18 October 1968)
Biggest defeat
 Hungary 8 - 3 Czechoslovakia Czechoslovakia
(Budapest, Hungary; 19 September 1937)
World Cup
Appearances 8 (First in 1934)
Best result Runners-up, 1934 and 1962
European Championship
Appearances 3 (First in 1960)
Best result Winners, 1976
Olympic medal record
Men's Football
Gold 1980 Moscow Team
Silver 1964 Tokyo Team

The Czechoslovakia national football team was the national association football team of Czechoslovakia from 1922 to 1992. At the dissolution of Czechoslovakia at the end of 1992, the team was participating in UEFA qualifying Group 4 for the 1994 World Cup; it completed this campaign under the name Representation of Czechs and Slovaks (RCS). The Czech Republic national football team is recognised by FIFA and UEFA as the successor of the Czechoslovakia team.[1] [2] [3]

The Czechoslovakia team was controlled by the Czechoslovak Football Association. The team had two runner-up finishes in World Cups (1934, 1962) and a European Championship win in 1976. Czechoslovakia qualified for the final stages of the 1990 World Cup and shortly afterwards their national coach Jozef Venglos moved to England to become Aston Villa manager.

Kit History[edit]

1934-1976

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1950-1967 (away)

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1980-1989

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1990 Home

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1990 Away

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FIFA World Cup record[edit]

Year Round Position GP W D* L GS GA
Uruguay 1930 Did Not Enter - - - - - - -
Italy 1934 Final 2 4 3 0 1 9 6
France 1938 Quarter-Finals 5 3 1 1 1 5 3
Brazil 1950 Did Not Enter - - - - - - -
Switzerland 1954 Round 1 14 2 0 0 2 0 7
Sweden 1958 Round 1 9 4 1 1 2 9 6
Chile 1962 Final 2 6 3 1 2 7 7
England 1966 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
Mexico 1970 Round 1 15 3 0 0 3 2 7
West Germany 1974 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
Argentina 1978 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
Spain 1982 Round 1 19 3 0 2 1 2 4
Mexico 1986 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
Italy 1990 Quarter-Finals 6 5 3 0 2 10 5
United States 1994 Did Not Qualify - - - - - - -
Total 8/15 2 Finals 30 11 5 14 44 45

European Championship record[edit]

Year Round GP W D* L GS GA
France 1960 Third place 2 1 0 1 2 3
Spain 1964 Did Not Qualify - - - - - -
Italy 1968 Did Not Qualify - - - - - -
Belgium 1972 Did Not Qualify - - - - - -
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia 1976 Champions 2 1 1 0 5 3
Italy 1980 Third place 4 1 2 1 5 4
France 1984 Did Not Qualify - - - - - -
West Germany 1988 Did Not Qualify - - - - - -
Sweden 1992 Did Not Qualify - - - - - -
Total 3/9 8 3 3 2 12 10

Player records[edit]

Most capped players[edit]

# Player Czechoslovakia career Caps Goals
1. Zdeněk Nehoda 1971–1987 90 31
2. Marián Masný 1974–1982 75 18
Ladislav Novák 1952–1966 75 1
4. František Plánička 1926–1938 73 0
5. Karol Dobiaš 1967–1980 67 6
6. Josef Masopust 1954–1966 63 10
Ivo Viktor 1966–1977 63 0
8. Ján Popluhár 1958–1967 62 1
9. Antonín Puč 1926–1938 60 34
10. Antonín Panenka 1973–1982 59 17

Top goalscorers[edit]

# Player Czechoslovakia career Goals Caps
1. Antonín Puč 1926–1938 34 60
2. Zdeněk Nehoda 1971–1987 31 90
3. Oldřich Nejedlý 1931–1938 28 43
Josef Silný 1925–1934 28 50
5. Adolf Scherer 1958–1964 22 36
František Svoboda 1927–1937 22 43
7. Marián Masný 1974–1982 18 75
8. Antonín Panenka 1973–1982 17 59
9. Jozef Adamec 1960–1971 14 44
Tomáš Skuhravý 1985–1993 14 43

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Czechoslovakia". wildstat.com. Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  2. ^ "Czechoslovakia national football team - Everything on ...". spiritus-temporis.com. Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  3. ^ "Czechoslovakia national football team". english.turkcebilgi.com. Retrieved 4 February 2014. 

See also[edit]

Preceded by
1972 West Germany 
European Champions
1976 (First title)
Succeeded by
1980 West Germany