List of Middle-earth Dwarves

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Dáin I)
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a list of Dwarves from J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional universe of Middle-earth.

A[edit]

Azaghâl[edit]

Azaghâl was dwarven-king of the Broadbeam Dwarves of Belegost during the First Age. He was slain by the dragon Glaurung after wounding him in the Nírnaeth Arnoediad. The Helm of Hador was originally made for him by Telchar.

B[edit]

Balin[edit]

Main article: Balin (Middle-earth)

Balin was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo Baggins on the Quest of Erebor. He wears a scarlet hood. He and his younger brother, Dwalin, were the sons of Fundin, and thus of the royal line of Durin. Many years after the death of Smaug, Balin led an expedition to recolonise Khazad-dûm. Although the colony began well, Balin was slain after only a few years, shot by Orcs as he looked into Kheled-zâram.

Thirty-four years later his tomb and the Book of Mazarbul that told of his expedition and death were discovered by the Fellowship of the Ring.

Balin is portrayed by Ken Stott in Peter Jackson's film version of The Hobbit .

Bifur[edit]

Bifur was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. Like other members of the company, his name comes directly from the Old Norse poem "Völuspá", part of the Poetic Edda. The forefathers of Bifur and his cousins Bofur and Bombur, who unlike the rest of Thorin's company are not of the royal line of Durin, come from Moria. Bifur was fond of raspberry jam and apple-tart at the unexpected party in Bag End, where he wore a yellow hood and played the clarinet. He gave the trolls quite a fight before getting sacked and helped trying to rescue Bilbo, and was set down uncomfortably near the fire as a reward. In The Fellowship of the Ring Glóin tells Frodo that Bifur and his cousins were all alive and well before the Council of Elrond.

In The Hobbit film series by Peter Jackson Bifur is portrayed by New Zealand actor William Kircher, who also played Tom the Troll in The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. In the backstory of films, Bifur suffers an injury during a battle, which leaves him with an Orcish axe stuck in his head. As a result, Bifur is only able to speak in Khuzdul, the ancient Dwarvish language, though he remains capable as both a manic fighter and a gentle toymaker. Kircher himself embraced the idea on an injury, stating that it helped him develop a character: “I went and started researching what that kind of injury can do to you. It’s kind of like getting a stroke, so it can affect their speech and the way they think, and they zone out, so I thought, I’ll really go for it.” Kircher also interpreted Bifur's personal journey throughout the films as a quest to find the particular orc who game him the injury, so that he can give it back.[1] The axe is no longer stuck in Bifur's head when the surviving dwarves bid farewell to Bilbo in the aftermath of The Battle of the Five Armies.

In the 2003 video game adaptation of The Hobbit Bifur tasks Bilbo several optional side-quests, but his voice actor is not specified in the credits. In The Lord of the Rings Online (2007) Bifur appears during the Siege of Erebor by the Easterlings in the final days of the War of the Ring. The game also introduces Bifur's son Bósi and grandson Bori, who become prominent characters during the Mines of Moria expansion, leading an expedition to reclaim Moria for the dwarves on the orders of Dain Ironfoot.

Bofur[edit]

Bofur was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. Like other members of the company, his name comes directly from the Old Norse poem "Völuspá", part of the Poetic Edda. The forefathers of Bofur, his younger brother Bombur and their cousin Bifur, who unlike the rest of Thorin's company are not of the royal line of Durin, come from Moria. Bofur spotted a yellow hood, liked mince-pies and cheese at tea and like his cousin Bifur played the clarinet at the unexpected party in Bag End. He didn't have as rough a barrel-ride as most of his companions, but was still too stiff to help unkeg the other dwarves following the escape from the Woodland Realm. Along with his brother Bombur he was nearly trapped at the bottom of a cliff on the Lonely Mountain after Smaug awoke before being rescued by the other dwarves. In The Fellowship of the Ring Glóin tells Frodo that Bofur was still alive and well before the Council of Elrond.

In The Hobbit film series by Peter Jackson Bofur is portrayed by Northern Irish actor James Nesbitt, whose daughters Mary and Peggy also portray Bard's daughters. Bofur's role is greatly expanded in the films, with him having multiple lines of dialogue and character scenes. Nesbitt described the character as being very protective over Bifur and Bombur, who have an injury and eating problem respectively. Since neither Bombur nor Bifur speak English throughout the three movies, Bofur also acts as a spokesman for all three of them, though in Nesbitt's words: "He can be deliberately very funny". In the extended version of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey Bofur sings The Man in the Moon song while the company stays in Rivendell - the song was originally written by J. R. R. Tolkien and appeared in The Fellowship of the Ring, while Nesbitt wrote the music.[2] Bofur notices Bilbo's attempt to slip away at the Misty Mountains and understanding the Hobbit's motives lets him go, though the company is captured by goblins before Bilbo can act on his decision. In The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Bofur shows his increased concern for Bilbo by being the first to notice his disappearance during encounter with spiders in Mirkwood. In a departure from the book, Bofur stays in Lake-Town with Oin, Fíli and Kíli while the rest of the company make the last leg of their journey towards Erebor, Bofur is the one to find a bundle of athelas which allows Tauriel to heal Kíli's poisoned wound. The four dwarves witness Smaug's destruction of Lake-Town and rejoin Thorin and the company shortly before the Battle of the Five Armies.

In the 2003 video game adaptation of The Hobbit Bofur tasks Bilbo with several optional side-quests, but his voice actor is not specified in the credits. In The Lord of the Rings Online (2007) Bofur appears during the Siege of Erebor by the Easterlings in the final days of the War of the Ring. The game also introduces Bofur's son Brogur and grandson Broin, who become prominent characters during the Mines of Moria expansion, leading an expedition to reclaim Moria for the dwarves on the orders of Dain Ironfoot.

Bombur[edit]

Bombur was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. His name comes from the Old Norse dwarf-name Bömburr (which aptly means tubby) in the poem "Völuspá", part of the Poetic Edda.[3] The forefathers of Bombur, his older brother Bofur and their cousin Bifur, who unlike the rest of Thorin's company are not of the royal line of Durin, come from Moria.

Of the thirteen dwarves in The Hobbit Bombur is the one with the most distinct appearance, described as "immensely fat and heavy", his weight was problematic at several points during the quest. He wears a pale green hood and displays a special passion for food; he played a drum during the unexpected party in Bag End. Bombur is frequently shown being the last in everything, foolish and making mistakes: he tumbled with Bifur and Bofur onto Thorin when they enter Bag End last, he entered Beorn's house last and yet earlier than intended, and he fell into the Enchanted River after voicing his disappointment in always being last. Bombur slept through several key moments of the book: most notably, after he fell into the Enchanted River in Mirkwood, he became entranced and slept for days, forcing his already despairing companions to carry his weight. When he finally awoke, Bombur had no recollection of anything that happened to the company since the party in Bag End. He was also asleep when his barrel was opened at Esgaroth after the escape from the Woodland Realm and when Bilbo discovered the secret entrance to Erebor. Trusting neither mountain paths nor ropes to hold his weight, Bombur chose to stay and guard the company's camp while the others moved up to the hidden door to Erebor. Only Bofur stayed with him and they were nearly trapped at the bottom of a cliff after Smaug awoke. The other dwarves were forced to swiftly use the ropes to lift them up just before the camp was destroyed by the rampaging dragon. During the siege of Erebor, Bilbo used Bombur's sleepiness to his advantage, promising to take Bombur's midnight watch and allow him to sleep, while escaping with the Arkenstone unnoticed. Many years later, in The Fellowship of the Ring, Glóin told Frodo Baggins before the Council of Elrond that Bombur was still alive, but had grown so fat, it took six young dwarves to lift him, as he could no longer move from his bed.

In the 1977 Rankin/Bass version of The Hobbit, Bombur was voiced by Paul Frees; contrary to the book he is depicted as being stabbed by a goblin during the Battle of Five Armies and dies in Bilbo's arms. In the 2003 video game adaptation of The Hobbit Bombur is voiced by Daran Norris. Bombur is only surviving member of Thorin's company not to appear in The Lord of the Rings Online, he is only referenced in the name of "Bombur's Beard Lager", a drink sold in a tavern in Ered Luin that is said to be his favorite in the years before the quest for Erebor.

In The Hobbit film series by Peter Jackson Bombur is portrayed by New Zealand actor Stephen Hunter. Bombur interaction in all three movies is entirely non-verbal; Jackson suggested to Hunter that Bombur could have more physical comedy moments at the expense of the lines and the actor embraced the idea,[4] as a result Bombur is often seen with his mouth full when a response is expected from him. Originally armed with only a kitchen utensil, Bombur is shown cooking for the entire company. Despite his immense weight and size, Bombur is shown to be quite agile: capable of running, jumping and climbing when his life is endangered. During the chase in Goblin-Town he manages to keep the running pace despite three goblins hanging on top of him and after being startled by Beorn in bear form, he quickly outruns the entire company. Bombur's most iconic scene in the book of him falling asleep in Mirkwood after falling into Enchanted River is omitted from the theatrical release of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, but is restored for the extended edition. In The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies Bombur sounds the horn that signals of Thorin and the company of dwarves joining the fight, he is also fighting on the battlefield later.

Borin[edit]

Borin was a Dwarf of Durin's Line, the second son of King Náin II. He was the ancestor of both Balin and Gimli Elf-friend of the Fellowship of the Ring.

D[edit]

Dáin I[edit]

Dáin I, the son of Náin II, was the last King of Durin's Folk united. Under Dáin I, attacks by dragons on their mines in the Ered Mithrin continued, and he was killed by a cold-drake in T.A. 2589 and succeeded by his sons Thrór, who established the realm of Erebor, and Grór, who held rule in the Iron Hills.

Dáin II Ironfoot[edit]

Main article: Dáin II Ironfoot

Dáin II Ironfoot was a descendant of Grór and lord of the Dwarves of the Iron Hills. Dáin joined his father's contingent in the Battle of Azanulbizar, at which time he slew Azog. After Thorin's death in the Battle of Five Armies, Dáin was proclaimed king of Durin's Folk. He fell in the Battle of Dale and was succeeded by his son Thorin III Stonehelm.

Dís[edit]

Dís was a female Dwarf, daughter of Thráin II and sister of Thorin Oakenshield. She was the mother of Fíli and Kíli, and the only dwarf-woman ever named in the annals, in respect of the valiant deaths of her sons.

Dori[edit]

Dori was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He was of Durin's House, a distant relative of Thorin Oakenshield. It fell to Dori to carry Bilbo in the tunnels of the Misty Mountains, but Dori dropped Bilbo and the other dwarves blamed him for "losing their burglar." Later, during the escape from the Wargs when they all climbed trees, Dori climbed back down to help Bilbo, who could not get up on his own. When the Eagles carried them off, Bilbo grabbed hold of Dori's legs as they went. In The Hobbit, Dori is described as "a decent fellow, despite his grumbling," while Thorin described him as being the strongest member of the company. He wears a purple hood.

He is portrayed by Mark Hadlow in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation. In this version, he is portrayed as the brother of Nori and Ori, and is overprotective of them. He and Ori are the first characters to be saved by the Eagles during the Warg attack when they fall from a tree hanging over a cliff. His trademark weapons are a sword and a mace.

Characters named Durin[edit]

Main article: Durin
  • Durin the Deathless, or King Durin I of Khazad-dûm, was the eldest of the Seven Fathers of the Dwarves, first created by Aulë the Vala.
  • Durin II was King of the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm.
  • Durin III was the first bearer of one of the Seven Rings, although this was not known to outsiders until the end of the Third Age.
  • Durin IV was King of the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm.
  • Durin V was King of the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm.
  • Durin VI was King of the Dwarves of Khazad-dûm when the Balrog was aroused deep beneath the city and killed Durin.
  • Durin VII was a descendant of Thorin III Stonehelm of Durin's folk, who was lord of the Dwarves of Erebor and the Iron Hills in Wilderland.

Dwalin[edit]

Dwalin was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He and his older brother, Balin, were the sons of Fundin, and thus of the royal line of Durin. Dwalin was the first Dwarf to arrive at Bag End. He wore a dark green hood and a golden belt, had a blue beard so long he had to tuck it into his belt, and like his brother Balin, he played the viol. Dwalin lent a hood and cloak to Bilbo when they set out on their journey. He died in the year 91 of the Fourth Age at the age of 340, very old even for a Dwarf.

His name is taken from Dvalin, a dwarf from the Poetic Edda and other Norse mythology.

Dwalin is portrayed by Graham McTavish in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation.[5] Recognisable by his bald head, tattoos and black beard, Dwalin is the tallest of Thorin's followers and the fiercest warrior, and his favorite weapon is the war hammer.[citation needed] In a flashback, Dwalin is seen during the War of the Dwarves and Orcs fighting against Azog's Orcs at Moria.

F[edit]

Farin[edit]

Farin was the son of Borin and father of Fundin and Gróin.

Fíli[edit]

Fíli was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He and his brother Kíli were the sons of Dís, Thorin's sister. He had a blue cloak, a yellow beard and a long nose, the longest of all the Dwarves on the Quest. The two brothers were described as being young in Dwarf terms, younger than the rest by some fifty years. They also had the best eyesight and so were often sent scouting or searching. The brothers are consistently described as cheerful, the only two to have come out of the barrels at Lake-town "more or less smiling." After the battle with the spiders he is forced to cut off most of his beard because it is covered in webbing.

Although Chapter 8 of The Hobbit describes Fíli as the youngest, in Appendix A of The Lord of the Rings his birth year is given as T.A. 2859, whereas Kíli's is 2864. Both brothers fell at the Battle of Five Armies, defending their uncle Thorin, and were buried with honour.

He is portrayed by Dean O'Gorman in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation. Rob Kazinsky was originally cast in the role but dropped out citing personal issues. In the film, he is the older brother. In The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Thorin says to Fíli, "When you are King, you'll understand", an indication that Fíli is older than Kíli In The Battle of Five Armies, Fíli and Kíli join Thorin and Dwalin in a commando operation to kill Azog. Separating from his brother, Fíli is captured by Azog and helplessly killed before the eyes of his shocked kinsmen and Bilbo, driving Kíli into a berserk rage.

Flói[edit]

Flói was one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. Killed 2989 by an orc archer, he had slain a great chieftain. Flói was buried under the grass at Mirrormere at Dimrill Dale. His death was recorded in the Book of Mazarbul.

Frár[edit]

Frár was one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. His death in 2994, while defending the bridge of Khazad-dûm, was recorded in the Book of Mazarbul.

Frerin[edit]

Frerin was the second son of Thráin II and the younger brother of Thorin Oakenshield. He perished at a young age when he joined in the Battle of Azanulbizar, the climactic battle of the War of the Dwarves and Orcs, beneath the East-gate of Khazad-dûm.

Frór[edit]

Frór was a Dwarf of the line of Durin who was killed with his father Dáin I by a cold-drake in the Grey Mountains. The kingship of Durin's folk clan then passed on to Frór's brother Thrór, who founded the kingdom of Erebor. However, the greater part of Durin's folk followed their younger brother Grór to the Iron Hills.

Fundin[edit]

Fundin was a Dwarf of the royal line of Durin. He was the son of Farin, brother of Gróin and father of Balin and Dwalin, who were two of Thorin Oakenshield's companions on the Quest of Erebor. Fundin was killed beneath the East Gate of Moria in the climactic Battle of Nanduhirion during the War of the Dwarves and Orcs. In the aftermath of the battle, all the bodies of those who fell were stripped of their armour and weaponry by their kinsmen, and were burnt upon pyres of wood, Fundin among them.

G[edit]

Gamil Zirak[edit]

Gamil Zirak was a Dwarvish smith and master of Telchar of Nogrod. Gamil was a great craftsman, whose work was found in the treasuries of Thingol.

Gimli[edit]

Main article: Gimli (Middle-earth)

Gimli, the son of Glóin, of the royal line of Durin. He was chosen by Elrond to be one of the nine members of the Fellowship of the Ring. He remained with Aragorn and Legolas throughout the War of the Ring, fighting at the Hornburg, Pelargir, and Pelennor Fields. His friendship with Legolas and love for Galadriel earned him the title of Elf-friend. He was played by John Rhys-Davies in The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King.

Glóin, son of Thorin[edit]

Glóin, the son of Thorin I, succeeded his father as the king of Durin's folk. He expanded the mines of the Ered Mithrin, and further abandoned Erebor.

Glóin, son of Gróin[edit]

Glóin, son of Gróin, was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo Baggins on the Quest of Erebor. He and his younger brother Óin were direct descendants of Durin the Deathless. Glóin and his son Gimli were sent to Rivendell as an embassy from Dáin II to bring news of Erebor, Moria, and what they knew of Sauron's plans; they arrived in time to attend the Council of Elrond. He wears a white hood. The name Gloin is found in the Völuspá.

He was a playable hero in the Dwarven Faction in the Electronic Arts Real-Time Strategy game The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II, and specialized in attacks that would either destroy or disable the opponents' buildings.

He is portrayed by Peter Hambleton in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film trilogy and by John Rhys-Davies in a brief, uncredited cameo in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. In The Desolation of Smaug Glóin is shown to be something of a miser who withholds his personal stash of money from the Company's payment to Bard until he first beholds the Lonely Mountain, whereupon he surrenders it all.

Gróin[edit]

Gróin was a Dwarf of the royal line of Durin. He was a son of Farin and the father of Glóin and Óin, as well as a grandfather of Gimli.

Grór[edit]

Grór was the youngest son of King Dáin I, and brother of Frór and Thrór, and father of Náin. When Thrór left the Grey Mountains to reclaim the Kingdom of Erebor, the majority of Durin's folk followed Grór to the Iron Hills, even though his brother remained king.

I[edit]

Ibûn[edit]

Ibûn, the son of Mîm, was one of the last of the Petty-dwarves.

K[edit]

Khîm[edit]

Khîm, the son of Mîm, was one of the last of the Petty-dwarves. He was slain by Andróg, a man of Túrin's company.

Kíli[edit]

Kíli was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He and his brother Fíli were the biological sons of Dís, Thorin's sister. He had a blue cloak and a yellow beard. The two brothers were described as being young in Dwarf terms, younger than the rest by some fifty years. They also had the best eyesight and so were often sent scouting or searching. The brothers are consistently described as having been cheerful, and the only two to have come out of the barrels at Lake-town "more or less smiling."

Although Fíli is described as being the youngest in Chapter 8 of The Hobbit, in Appendix A of The Lord of the Rings his birth year is given as T.A. 2859, whereas Kíli's is 2864. Both brothers fell at the Battle of Five Armies, defending their uncle Thorin, and were buried with honour.

In Peter Jackson's film adaptation of The Hobbit, Kíli is portrayed by Aidan Turner. He is the archer of Thorin's company, and is the only Dwarf in the film to not have a full-grown beard, only stubble. In this portrayal, despite their vastly differing backgrounds, he and the elven warrior Tauriel begin to form a bond, as they recognize each other as kindred spirits. During the Battle of Five Armies, he joins Thorin's commando team to take down Azog on Ravenhill, and when Tauriel arrives to aid him, she is confronted and almost killed by Azog's son Bolg. Kíli leaps to her defense, causing Bolg to kill him instead. Tauriel is left mourning his loss, showing that her love for the dwarf was genuine.

L[edit]

Lóni[edit]

Lóni was one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. His death in 2994 was recorded in the Book of Mazarbul.

M[edit]

Mîm[edit]

Mîm was one of the last of the Petty-dwarves who lived together with his two sons, Ibûn and Khîm, at Amon Rûdh in west Beleriand, where he kept a secret treasury. Although he harboured the company of Túrin, he also betrayed them to Orcs, as a man of Túrin's company had slain his son Khîm. Mîm was eventually slain by Húrin at Nargothrond.

During Túrin's time with the Outlaws, Mîm and sons were seen as they snuck past the outlaws carrying heavy sacks. Mîm was captured, and arrows were shot at his sons Ibûn and Khîm.

In exchange for his life, Mîm was forced to lead the outlaws to his secret halls in Amon Rûdh. There, it turned out Khîm had been killed by an arrow loosed by Andróg, who was then forced to break his bow and arrows, and Túrin repenting offered his service to Mîm. For this reason Mîm tolerated the outlaws, and although he never loved Túrin, the dwarf at least came to respect him.

When Beleg Cúthalion arrived at Amon Rûdh, Mîm was angry: he hated elves, especially the Sindar. Nevertheless he had to tolerate the elf in his halls. This hatred toward Beleg led Mim to betray Amon Rûdh to Morgoth. After Amon Rûdh was betrayed to Morgoth, All the outlaws were slain, save Túrin and Beleg. Beleg was left tied up on the summit of Amon Rûdh by the orcs, and there Mîm found him and attempted to kill him but was scared away by a dying outlaw called Andróg. Mîm escaped, but it seems Ibûn was killed by orcs. Eventually Mîm made his way to ruined Nargothrond after Túrin had killed Glaurung, and took the treasure for his own.

Húrin Thalion, who had seen all that had happened to Túrin with Morgoth's eyes, came across Mîm in Nargothrond, and killed him, deeming him partially responsible for Túrin's fate. Húrin took the Nauglamir, the Necklace of the Dwarves, and brought it to Thingol. The Necklace was later the cause of the ruin of Doriath.

In the earlier conception of the mythology, found in The Book of Lost Tales but abandoned before the Silmarillion was written, Mîm was set as the guardian of the gold of Nargothrond by Glaurung. When Húrin killed Mîm, the latter cursed the gold with his dying words. Húrin and his band of outlaws then transported the treasure to Thingol, and the cursed gold was the cause of ruin of Doriath. The curse also caused the destruction of the Dwarven army which invaded Doriath by the hands of a host of wood-elves led by Beren, who took the Nauglamir and gave it to Luthien. The curse on the necklace cause Luthien to fade quicker. The curse also caused the sons of Fëanor to attack Dior, son of Beren.

N[edit]

Náin I[edit]

Náin I was the son of Durin VI, and succeeded his father as King of Khazad-dûm. When his father was slain by the Balrog, Náin attempted to continue the kingdom, but was himself killed the following year. The remainder of Durin's Folk fled Khazad-dûm, and the city was renamed Moria. Náin was succeeded on the throne by Thráin I.

Náin II[edit]

Náin II was a King of Durin's Folk, son of Óin. Under Náin, the Dwarves lived peacefully in the Ered Mithrin until they were attacked by dragons. He was succeeded by his son, Dáin I. He had a younger son Borin, from whom several of Thorin Oakenshield's companions were descended.

Náin, son of Grór[edit]

Náin, son of Grór, was the Dwarf-lord of the Iron Hills and a descendant of the royal line of Durin. He was killed at the Battle of Nanduhirion when Azog the Orc Chieftain broke his neck. The rule of the Iron Hills passed to his son, Dáin Ironfoot, who avenged his father's death by killing Azog. (Dáin later succeeded to the kingship of Erebor.)

Náli[edit]

Náli was one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. His death in 2994 was also in the Book of Mazarbul.

Nár[edit]

Nár was the companion of Thrór during his ill-fated attempt to reclaim Moria. After Thrór's death, Nár bore the ill tidings to Thrór's son Thráin II.

Tolkien derived the name Nár from the Old Norse dwarf-name Nár, which means corpse.[6] Thus the Dwarf's name alludes to his gruesome news.

Narvi[edit]

Narvi was a dwarf of Moria who built its West-gate in the Second Age. His name was inscribed on the door by Celebrimbor, writing in Sindarin language on Narvi's behalf. The inscription reads Im Narvi hain echant. Celebrimbor o Eregion teithant i thiw hin: "I, Narvi, made them [the Doors]. Celebrimbor of Eregion drew these signs."

Nori[edit]

Nori was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He was of Durin's House, a distant relative of Thorin Oakenshield. He wears a purple hood, like Dori.

He is portrayed by Jed Brophy in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation. He sports a distinct triple mohawk hairstyle and fights with a long spiked staff, along with numerous concealed weapons. He is also a longtime thief who shares a strained relationship with his two brothers.

O[edit]

Óin, son of Glóin[edit]

Óin, son of Glóin, succeeded his father as King of Durin's folk, reigning from 2385 to 2488 Third Age.

Óin, son of Gróin[edit]

Óin, elder son of Gróin, was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. Along with his brother Glóin, he was counted on to start the campfires, though the brothers bickered over the task. He wears a brown hood. He was also one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. He was killed by the Watcher in the Water while trying to escape via the Western Door.

In Peter Jackson's movie The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Óin is played by John Callen.[7] He wields a spear and uses an ear trumpet.[citation needed] In addition to his skill at lighting fires, Óin is the group's healer.[8]

Ori[edit]

Ori was one of the twelve companions of Thorin and Bilbo on the Quest of Erebor. He was of Durin's House, a distant relative of Thorin Oakenshield. He was also one of the Dwarves who entered Moria with Balin. He wears a grey hood, and loves the arts. He was among the last members of Balin's colony to be killed (T.A. 2994), as is known by his entering the last records in the Book of Mazarbul before their final hopeless stand against the Orcs. This book was later discovered by the Fellowship of the Ring.

Ori's penmanship in the Book of Mazarbul suggests he was probably the scribe of Thorin & Co.'s letter at the start of the Quest of Erebor.

He is portrayed by Adam Brown in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation. In this adaptation, Ori uses a slingshot as his trademark weapon and serves as the group's scribe. Ori has a chinstrap beard and bowl cut[citation needed] and a cable knit scarf.[9]

T[edit]

Telchar[edit]

Telchar was a Dwarf of Nogrod in the Blue Mountains. He was one of the greatest smiths of Middle-earth. Among his works were Angrist, Narsil, and the Dragon-Helm of Dor-lómin.

Thorin I[edit]

Thorin I was the son of Thráin I, and succeeded his father as King of Erebor and King of Durin's folk. He left Erebor with the greater part of his folk, moving to the Ered Mithrin. He was succeeded as King by Glóin.

Thorin II Oakenshield[edit]

Main article: Thorin Oakenshield

Thorin II Oakenshield was the King of Durin's Folk who led the expedition to destroy Smaug in T.A. 2941 and was slain in the Battle of Five Armies.

In Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film trilogy, Thorin is portrayed by Richard Armitage.

Thorin III Stonehelm[edit]

Thorin III Stonehelm was the son and heir of Dáin II Ironfoot of Durin's folk, who was lord of the Dwarves of Erebor and the Iron Hills in Wilderland. He became King under the Mountain when his father was killed during the War of the Ring in T.A. 3019. Thorin III helped rebuild Erebor and Dale, and prospered. His realm became a close ally of the Reunited Kingdom of King Elessar.

During his rule, Gimli led a number of Dwarves south to Aglarond, where a new lordship was established, most likely a colony of Durin's Folk under the vassalage of the King of Erebor. Thorin III had a descendant, Durin VII the Last, who was held to be the final reincarnation of Durin the Deathless. It is unclear whether Durin VII was a son of Thorin III or a later descendant.

Thráin I[edit]

Thráin I, sometimes called Thráin the Old, was the son of Náin I, and succeeded his father as King of Khazad-dûm. When his father was slain by the Balrog as his grandfather Durin VI had been killed before, Thráin fled Khazad-dûm together with the remainder of Durin's folk, migrating to Erebor, which he founded in T.A. 1999. He was succeeded as King by Thorin I.

Thráin II[edit]

Main article: Thráin II

Thráin II was the father of Thorin Oakenshield and the son of Thrór. After the death of his father he went wandering, and was captured by the Necromancer in Dol Guldur at which time the last of the Seven Rings of Power was taken from him.

He is portrayed by Mike Mizrahi in Peter Jackson's The Hobbit film adaptation.

Thrór[edit]

Thrór (T.A. 2542 − 2790) was a King of Durin's folk, the son of Dáin I, father of Thráin II, and brother to Frór and Grór. He became king in 2589 when a cold-drake killed Dáin I and Frór. The following year he returned to reoccupy Erebor as King under the Mountain, but many of his people followed his brother Grór to settle instead in the Iron Hills farther east.

Thrór and his people prospered in Erebor, but their success attracted the attention of Smaug the dragon, who in 2770 attacked the mountain and drove the surviving Dwarves away. Thrór and his people then wandered abroad, becoming increasingly poor and desperate. In 2790 Thrór committed the heirlooms of his house to his son (Thráin II), and with his companion Nár sought to re-enter Moria. He was captured there by Azog the Orc, who tortured him and chopped off his head. His body was thrown out the east gate, hacked to pieces and fed to the ravens in full view of Nár. This started the War of the Dwarves and Orcs.

The heirlooms which Thrór handed on to Thráin included a Ring of Power, and items relating to a secret entrance to Erebor: a map (later called Thrór's map) and a key.

Tolkien derived the name Thrór from the Old Norse dwarf-name Þrór, which means thrive, an allusion to Thrór's prosperity.[10]

Thrór is portrayed by Jeffrey Thomas in Peter Jackson's film version of The Hobbit. In this version Azog beheads him at the Battle of Azanulbizar.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Inline citations[edit]

  1. ^ Noelene Clark (13 December 2012). "‘Hobbit': William Kircher speaks Dwarvish, talks Bifur’s injury". herocomplex.latimes.com. LA Times. Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  2. ^ by Ian Nathan (2012). "The Hobbit Interviews: James Nesbitt On Bofur". empireonline.com. Empire Online. Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  3. ^ John D. Rateliff (2005), The History of the Hobbit, volume 2 Return to Bag-End, Appendix III 'The Dvergatal; ISBN 0-00-725066-5.
  4. ^ Seanna Cronin (23 December 2013). "The Desolation of Smaug star without lines: Stephen Hunter". sunshinecoastdaily.com. Retrieved 17 December 2014. 
  5. ^ "TORN Exclusive: Graham ‘Dwalin’ McTavish Interview". TheOneRing.net. December 9, 2010.
  6. ^ John D. Rateliff (2005), The History of the Hobbit, volume 2 Return to Bag-End, Appendix III 'The Dvergatal; ISBN 0-00-725066-5.
  7. ^ "EXCLUSIVE: Getting to know John Callen aka Óin". TheOneRing.net. November 20, 2010.
  8. ^ Ian Nathan. "The Hobbit Interviews: John Callen Talks Oin". Empire. Retrieved October 5, 2014.
  9. ^ (Untitled) The Hobbit Blog. Retrieved October 5, 2014.
  10. ^ John D. Rateliff (2005), The History of the Hobbit, volume 2 Return to Bag-End, Appendix III 'The Dvergatal; ISBN 0-00-725066-5.

Sources[edit]