D. Bernard Amos

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Dennis Bernard Amos (April 16, 1923 – May 15, 2003) was an American immunologist. National Academies Press called Amos "one of the most distinguished scientists of the genetics of individuality of the twentieth century".[1] In 1969, Amos and Dr. David Hume founded the first regional organ sharing program in the United States.[2] Amos made significant contributions in immunogenetics, tumor immunity, and transplantation immunology.[1]

Awards and Distinctions[edit]

Amos was President of the American Association of Immunologists,[3] President and Founder of the International Transplantation Society,[3] and the co-founder and Editor-In-Chief of the journal Human Immunology.[3] Amos was elected to the National Academies of Science.[3] He received the 3M Award from FASEB,[3] the Rose Payne Award for Distinguished Science by the American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics,[3] and the National Institutes of Health Research Career Award.[3] He was awarded the Golding Bird Prize in Bacteriology as well as the Leonard Luubock Gold Medal.[4] Amos was professor of immunology and experimental surgery at Duke University from 1962 to 1993.[2]

Life and career[edit]

Amos was born April 16, 1923 in Bromley, Kent, England. He earned his B.S. and M.B from Chelsea Polytechnic and his M.D. from Guy's Hospital Medical School in 1963.

References[edit]

External links[edit]