D. Thomas Russillo

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D(omenic) Thomas Russillo
Born March 9, 1902[1][2]
Providence, Rhode Island[1]
Died 1978[2] / 1980[3]
Cranston, Rhode Island
Nationality USA
Known for Architect

Domenic Thomas Russillo, AIA (1902-1980), was a minor American architect who practiced in mid-20th-century Rhode Island and Massachusetts.

Early life and education[edit]

Russillo was born March 9, 1902 in Providence, Rhode Island, and educated at the Rhode Island School of Design from 1922–1924 and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1926.[1]

Career[edit]

Russillo began his career as a designer for the architectural firm of Jackson, Robertson & Adams, working there from 1928 to 1932.[1] He started his own firm, D. Thomas Russillo in 1933 during the Great Depression, eventually registering as an architect in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.[1] He became a member of the Rhode Island Chapter of the AIA in 1944.[1] As of 1970, he worked at 334 Westminster Mall, Providence.[1] William Mackenzie Woodward of the Rhode Island Historical Preservation and Heritage Commission declared that "Russillo was clearly aware of and more than merely competent in producing designs within the contemporary mainstream."[2] Many of Russillo's residential designs can be found "on the East Side in the Blackstone Boulevard area, as well as the Smith Hill neighborhood. Most of these houses are Moderne- or Frank-Lloyd-Wright-inspired designs."[2]

Personal life[edit]

As of 1970, he lived at 66 S. Hill Dr, Cranston.[1] The AIA was notified of his death in 1980.[3]

Works[edit]

  • Anthony Gizzarelli House, 665 Pleasant Valley Pkwy., Providence, RI (1947)[2]
  • Leonard Levin House, 80 Clarendon Ave., Providence, RI (1954)[2]
  • Peter Bardach House, 33 Intervale Rd., Providence, RI (1958)[2]
  • Believe Shopping Center, Newport, RI (1960)[1]
  • Boy Scouts of America Building, 175 Broad St., Providence, RI (1962)[1]
  • Max Winograd House, 100 Clarendon Ave., Providence, RI (1962)[2]
  • Fall River Jewish Home for the Aged, Fall River, MA (1967)[1]
  • Norteck Inc. Building, Cranston, RI (1969)[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Domenic Thomas Russillo" American Architects Directory, Third Edition (New York City: R.R. Bowker LLC, 1970), p.790.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Boy Scout Lodge, Rhode Island, with a brief biography of the architect, Artinruins.com (Accessed 10 April 2011) -- Relevant section: "The building was erected around 1962. The man responsible for the design of this structure was D. Thomas Russillo (1902-1978), a local architect. In addition to the Boy Scout Building, he designed several houses on the East Side in the Blackstone Blvd area as well as the Smith Hill neighborhood. Most of these houses are Moderne- or Frank-Lloyd-Wright-inspired designs. According to Wm. Mackenzie Woodward of the RI Historic Preservation and Heritage Commission, "Russillo was clearly aware of & more than merely competent in producing designs within the contemporary mainstream." Thanks to Mr. Woodward for the brief bio of the architect, and for the list of properties he designed. Russillo-designed homes (and links to Google maps): The Anthony Gizzarelli House (1947-48), 665 Pleasant Valley Parkway (no street view available) The Leonard Levin House (1954-55), 80 Clarendon Avenue The Max & Roslyn H. Winograd House (1962), 100 Clarendon Avenue The Peter Bardach House (1958), 33 Intervale Road."
  3. ^ a b "Domenic Thomas Russillo" The AIA Historical Directory of American Architects, Last modified at 11/20/2009 9:49 AM by Nancy Hadley (Accessed 17 January 2010)