DAZL

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Deleted in azoospermia-like
Identifiers
Symbols DAZL ; DAZH; DAZL1; DAZLA; SPGYLA
External IDs OMIM601486 HomoloGene1034 GeneCards: DAZL Gene
RNA expression pattern
PBB GE DAZL 206588 at tn.png
More reference expression data
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 1618 n/a
Ensembl ENSG00000092345 n/a
UniProt Q92904 n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_001190811 n/a
RefSeq (protein) NP_001177740 n/a
Location (UCSC) Chr 3:
16.63 – 16.71 Mb
n/a
PubMed search [1] n/a

Deleted in azoospermia-like is a protein that in humans is encoded by the DAZL gene.[1]

Function[edit]

The DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) gene family encodes potential RNA binding proteins that are expressed in prenatal and postnatal germ cells of males and females. The protein encoded by this gene is localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm of fetal germ cells and to the cytoplasm of developing oocytes. In the testis, this protein is localized to the nucleus of spermatogonia but relocates to the cytoplasm during meiosis where it persists in spermatids and spermatozoa. Transposition and amplification of this autosomal gene during primate evolution gave rise to the DAZ gene cluster on the Y chromosome. Mutations in this gene have been linked to severe spermatogenic failure and infertility in males.[2]

Interactions[edit]

DAZL has been shown to interact with DAZ1.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Saxena R, Brown LG, Hawkins T, Alagappan RK, Skaletsky H, Reeve MP et al. (Nov 1996). "The DAZ gene cluster on the human Y chromosome arose from an autosomal gene that was transposed, repeatedly amplified and pruned". Nature Genetics 14 (3): 292–9. doi:10.1038/ng1196-292. PMID 8896558. 
  2. ^ "Entrez Gene: DAZL deleted in azoospermia-like". 
  3. ^ Ruggiu M, Cooke HJ (Jul 2000). "In vivo and in vitro analysis of homodimerisation activity of the mouse Dazl1 protein". Gene 252 (1-2): 119–26. doi:10.1016/S0378-1119(00)00219-5. PMID 10903443. 
  4. ^ Tsui S, Dai T, Roettger S, Schempp W, Salido EC, Yen PH (May 2000). "Identification of two novel proteins that interact with germ-cell-specific RNA-binding proteins DAZ and DAZL1". Genomics 65 (3): 266–73. doi:10.1006/geno.2000.6169. PMID 10857750. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Shan Z, Hirschmann P, Seebacher T, Edelmann A, Jauch A, Morell J et al. (Dec 1996). "A SPGY copy homologous to the mouse gene Dazla and the Drosophila gene boule is autosomal and expressed only in the human male gonad". Human Molecular Genetics 5 (12): 2005–11. doi:10.1093/hmg/5.12.2005. PMID 8968755. 
  • Yen PH, Chai NN, Salido EC (Dec 1996). "The human autosomal gene DAZLA: testis specificity and a candidate for male infertility". Human Molecular Genetics 5 (12): 2013–7. doi:10.1093/hmg/5.12.2013. PMID 8968756. 
  • Seboun E, Barbaux S, Bourgeron T, Nishi S, Agulnik A, Egashira M et al. (Apr 1997). "Gene sequence, localization, and evolutionary conservation of DAZLA, a candidate male sterility gene". Genomics 41 (2): 227–35. doi:10.1006/geno.1997.4635. PMID 9143498. 
  • Ruggiu M, Speed R, Taggart M, McKay SJ, Kilanowski F, Saunders P et al. (Sep 1997). "The mouse Dazla gene encodes a cytoplasmic protein essential for gametogenesis". Nature 389 (6646): 73–7. doi:10.1038/37987. PMID 9288969. 
  • Chai NN, Phillips A, Fernandez A, Yen PH (Aug 1997). "A putative human male infertility gene DAZLA: genomic structure and methylation status". Molecular Human Reproduction 3 (8): 705–8. doi:10.1093/molehr/3.8.705. PMID 9294855. 
  • Agulnik AI, Zharkikh A, Boettger-Tong H, Bourgeron T, McElreavey K, Bishop CE (Sep 1998). "Evolution of the DAZ gene family suggests that Y-linked DAZ plays little, or a limited, role in spermatogenesis but underlines a recent African origin for human populations". Human Molecular Genetics 7 (9): 1371–7. doi:10.1093/hmg/7.9.1371. PMID 9700189. 
  • Nishi S, Hoshi N, Kasahara M, Ishibashi T, Fujimoto S (Jun 1999). "Existence of human DAZLA protein in the cytoplasm of human oocytes". Molecular Human Reproduction 5 (6): 495–7. doi:10.1093/molehr/5.6.495. PMID 10340994. 
  • Slee R, Grimes B, Speed RM, Taggart M, Maguire SM, Ross A et al. (Jul 1999). "A human DAZ transgene confers partial rescue of the mouse Dazl null phenotype". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 96 (14): 8040–5. doi:10.1073/pnas.96.14.8040. PMC 22184. PMID 10393944. 
  • Dorfman DM, Genest DR, Reijo Pera RA (Oct 1999). "Human DAZL1 encodes a candidate fertility factor in women that localizes to the prenatal and postnatal germ cells". Human Reproduction 14 (10): 2531–6. doi:10.1093/humrep/14.10.2531. PMID 10527983. 
  • Tsai MY, Chang SY, Lo HY, Chen IH, Huang FJ, Kung FT et al. (Mar 2000). "The expression of DAZL1 in the ovary of the human female fetus". Fertility and Sterility 73 (3): 627–30. doi:10.1016/S0015-0282(99)00544-0. PMID 10689024. 
  • Brekhman V, Itskovitz-Eldor J, Yodko E, Deutsch M, Seligman J (May 2000). "The DAZL1 gene is expressed in human male and female embryonic gonads before meiosis". Molecular Human Reproduction 6 (5): 465–8. doi:10.1093/molehr/6.5.465. PMID 10775651. 
  • Ruggiu M, Saunders PT, Cooke HJ (2000). "Dynamic subcellular distribution of the DAZL protein is confined to primate male germ cells". Journal of Andrology 21 (3): 470–7. PMID 10819456. 
  • Tsui S, Dai T, Warren ST, Salido EC, Yen PH (Jun 2000). "Association of the mouse infertility factor DAZL1 with actively translating polyribosomes". Biology of Reproduction 62 (6): 1655–60. doi:10.1095/biolreprod62.6.1655. PMID 10819768. 
  • Tsui S, Dai T, Roettger S, Schempp W, Salido EC, Yen PH (May 2000). "Identification of two novel proteins that interact with germ-cell-specific RNA-binding proteins DAZ and DAZL1". Genomics 65 (3): 266–73. doi:10.1006/geno.2000.6169. PMID 10857750. 
  • Ruggiu M, Cooke HJ (Jul 2000). "In vivo and in vitro analysis of homodimerisation activity of the mouse Dazl1 protein". Gene 252 (1-2): 119–26. doi:10.1016/S0378-1119(00)00219-5. PMID 10903443. 
  • Reijo RA, Dorfman DM, Slee R, Renshaw AA, Loughlin KR, Cooke H et al. (Nov 2000). "DAZ family proteins exist throughout male germ cell development and transit from nucleus to cytoplasm at meiosis in humans and mice". Biology of Reproduction 63 (5): 1490–6. doi:10.1095/biolreprod63.5.1490. PMID 11058556. 
  • Xu EY, Moore FL, Pera RA (Jun 2001). "A gene family required for human germ cell development evolved from an ancient meiotic gene conserved in metazoans". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 98 (13): 7414–9. doi:10.1073/pnas.131090498. PMC 34683. PMID 11390979. 
  • Van Golde RJ, Tuerlings JH, Kremer JA, Braat DD, Schoute F, Hoefsloot LH (Jul 2001). "DAZLA: an important candidate gene in male subfertility?". Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics 18 (7): 395–9. doi:10.1023/A:1016678624225. PMC 3455824. PMID 11499325. 
  • Lin YM, Chen CW, Sun HS, Tsai SJ, Hsu CC, Teng YN et al. (Nov 2001). "Expression patterns and transcript concentrations of the autosomal DAZL gene in testes of azoospermic men". Molecular Human Reproduction 7 (11): 1015–22. doi:10.1093/molehr/7.11.1015. PMID 11675467.