Daba (settlement)

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Daba (Georgian: დაბა) is a type of human settlement in Georgia, a “small city”.[1][2] It is equivalent to an urban-type settlement in some other countries of the former Soviet Union.

In present-day Georgia, daba is typically defined as a settlement with the population of no less than 3,000 and established social and technical infrastructure, which enables it to function as a local economic and cultural center; it, furthermore, should not possess large agricultural lands. The status of daba can also be granted to a settlement with the population of less than 3,000, provided it functions as an administrative center of the district (municipality) or has a prospect of further economic and population growth in the nearest future.[1]

Etymology[edit]

Daba is the term well known in Old Georgian, where it had the meaning "cornfield, hamlet". It is derived from a Common Kartvelian root *dab(a), which is also a source of the Svan däb, "cornfield", and, possibly, the Mingrelian dobera (dobira), "arable land". The derivative words are udabno, "desert", and mdabali, "low".[3] The name daba is also a basis for several placenames in Georgia, such as Daba, Akhaldaba ("new daba"), Q'veldaba ("cheese daba"), and Dabadzveli ("old daba").

List of daba in Georgia[edit]

As of 2011, 50 settlements are categorized in Georgia as daba. These, listed according to a population size (2002 census), are:

Daba Population (2002) Status granted District/Municipality Region or autonomous republic Note
1. Surami 9,800 1926 Khashuri Shida Kartli
2. Ts'q'neti 8,200 1967 Tbilisi Tbilisi
3. Chakvi 8,100 1954 Kobuleti Autonomous Republic of Adjara
4. Kazreti 7,300 1965 Bolnisi Kvemo Kartli
5. Khelvachauri 6,100 1968 Khelvachauri Autonomous Republic of Adjara
6. Ochkhamuri 5,000 1954 Kobuleti Autonomous Republic of Adjara
7. Chkhorotsqu 5,000 1960 Chkhorotsqu Samegrelo-Zemo Svaneti
8. Laituri 3,600 1953 Ozurgeti Guria
9. Tianeti 3,600 1960 Tianeti Mtskheta-Mtianeti
10. Shaumiani 3,600 1932 Marneuli Kvemo Kartli
11. Agara 3,500 1934 Kareli Shida Kartli
12. Makhinjauri 3,400 1959 Khelvachauri Autonomous Republic of Adjara
13. Aspindza 3,200 1961 Aspindza Samtskhe-Javakheti
14. Manglisi 2,800 1926 Tetritsqaro Kvemo Kartli
15. Kveda Nasakirali 2,600 1976 Ozurgeti Guria
16. Mestia 2,600 1968 Mestia Samegrelo-Zemo Svaneti
17. Akhalgori 2,500 1960 Akhalgori Mtskheta-Mtianeti Controlled by the Republic of South Ossetia
Russian-occupied territory under the Law of Georgia on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008)[4]
18. Kharagauli 2,400 1944 Kharagauli Imereti
19. Akhaldaba 2,400 1965 Borjomi Samtskhe-Javakheti
20. Didi Lilo 2,400 1974 Tbilisi Tbilisi
21. Chokhatauri 2,100 1947 Chokhatauri Guria
22. Kulashi 2,000 1961 Samtredia Imereti
23. Bakuriani 2,000 1926 Borjomi Samtskhe-Javakheti
24. Zhinvali 1,900 1976 Dusheti Mtskheta-Mtianeti
25. Kojori 1,900 1968 Tbilisi Tbilisi
26. Stepantsminda 1,800 1966 Kazbegi Mtskheta-Mtianeti
27. Lentekhi 1,700 1969 Lentekhi Racha-Lechkhumi and Kvemo Svaneti
28. Shorapani 1,600 1938 Zestaponi Imereti
29. Pasanauri 1,600 1966 Dusheti Mtskheta-Mtianeti
30. Ureki 1,400 1953 Ozurgeti Guria
31. Abastumani 1,400 1926 Adigeni Samtskhe-Javakheti
32. Naruja 1,300 1987 Ozurgeti Guria
33. Keda 1,200 1966 Keda Autonomous Republic of Adjara
34. Khulo 1,100 1964 Khulo Autonomous Republic of Adjara
35. Tsagveri 1,100 1926 Borjomi Samtskhe-Javakheti
36. Adigeni 1,000 1961 Adigeni Samtskhe-Javakheti
37. Shuakhevi 0,900 1974 Shuakhevi Autonomous Republic of Adjara
38. Bakurianis Andeziti 0,500 1956 Borjomi Samtskhe-Javakheti
39. Sioni 0,400 1960 Tianeti Mtskheta-Mtianeti
40. Tamarisi 0,400 1982 Marneuli Kvemo Kartli
41. Bediani 0,300 1963 Tsalka Samtskhe-Javakheti
42. Trialeti 0,300 1944 Tsalka Kvemo Kartli
43. Kharistvala 0,000 1956 Ambrolauri Racha-Lechkhumi and Kvemo Svaneti Depopulated as a result of the 1991 earthquake and a series of avalanches
44. Bichvinta - 1963 Gagra Autonomous Republic of Abkhazia Controlled by the Republic of Abkhazia
Russian-occupied territory under the Law of Georgia on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008)[4]
45. Gantiadi - 1966 Gagra Autonomous Republic of Abkhazia Controlled by the Republic of Abkhazia
Russian-occupied territory under the Law of Georgia on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008)[4]
46. Miusera - 1990 Gudauta Autonomous Republic of Abkhazia Controlled by the Republic of Abkhazia
Russian-occupied territory under the Law of Georgia on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008)[4]
47. Gulripshi - 1975 Gulripshi Autonomous Republic of Abkhazia Controlled by the Republic of Abkhazia
Russian-occupied territory under the Law of Georgia on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008)[4]
48. Q'ornisi - - Kareli Shida Kartli Controlled by the Republic of South Ossetia
Russian-occupied territory under the Law of Georgia on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008)[4]
49. Kvaisa - - Oni Racha-Lechkhumi and Kvemo Svaneti Controlled by the Republic of South Ossetia
Russian-occupied territory under the Law of Georgia on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008)[4]
50. Java - - Java Shida Kartli Controlled by the Republic of South Ossetia
Russian-occupied territory under the Law of Georgia on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008)[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b (Georgian) მოხელის სამაგიდო ლექსიკონი / გაეროს განვითარების პროგრამა; [შემდგ.: სამსონ ურიდია და სხვ.; რედ.: ვაჟა გურგენიძე] - თბ., 2004 - 483გვ.: ცხრ.; 24სმ. - (საჯარო მოსამსახურის ბ-კა). - ISBN 99940-0-063-2.
  2. ^ Allen, William Edward David (1932, reissued 1971), A History of the Georgian People: From the Beginning Down to the Russian Conquest in the Nineteenth Century, p. 240. Taylor & Francis, ISBN 0-7100-6959-6.
  3. ^ Klimov, Georgy (1998), Etymological Dictionary of the Kartvelian Languages, p. 36. Walter de Gruyter, ISBN 3-11-015658-X.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Law of Georgian on Occupied Territories (431-IIs, October 23, 2008). State Ministry for Reintegration. Retrieved on December 15, 2011.