Dacetini

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Dacetini
Daceton armigerum casent0178489 dorsal 1.jpg
Daceton armigerum, the type species of the genus Daceton, in turn type genus of Dacetini
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Hymenoptera
Family: Formicidae
Subfamily: Myrmicinae
Tribe: Dacetini
Forel, 1892
Type genus
Daceton
Perty, 1833
Diversity[1]
8 genera

Dacetini is a tribe of small predatory ants in the subfamily Myrmicinae. The tribe is large and diverse, containing more than 900 species in eight genera.[1] The systematic status of the tribe has been the focus of debate, and there is evidence that suggests that Dacetini may not be monophyletic.

Genera[edit]

Description[edit]

The tribe is composed of small, cryptic, predatory ants that typically occur in soil and/or leaf litter where they feed on various minute arthropods. Species in this group show great diversity in predatory strategies, which is reflected in the marked differentiation between species groups. With their unique-looking body types and head shapes that are variously adorned with bizarre station, elongate mandibles with uniquely arrayed dentition, and as-yet-unexplained cuticular outgrowths called spongiform tissue, members of this group are among the most unusual in the ant world.[2]

Taxonomy[edit]

Baroni Urbani & de Andrade (2007) proposed a synonymization of the tribe Basicerotini with Dacetini and that all basicerotine genera be placed in the single genus Basiceros.[3] There is currently variable acceptance of their reclassification.[4] Bolton (2012) partially accepted their propositions but still considers Dacetini and Basicerotini as separate tribes.[5] Molecular phylogenetic evidence by Brady et al. (2006) suggests that Dacetini may not be monophyletic.[6]

References[edit]

  • This article incorporates text from a scholarly publication published under a copyright license that allows anyone to reuse, revise, remix and redistribute the materials in any form for any purpose: Azorsa, Frank; Sosa-Calvo, Jeffrey (2008), "Description of a remarkable new species of ant in the genus Daceton Perty (Formicidae: Dacetini) from South America.", Zootaxa 1749: 27–38  Please check the source for the exact licensing terms.
  • This article incorporates text from a scholarly publication published under a copyright license that allows anyone to reuse, revise, remix and redistribute the materials in any form for any purpose: Chen, X.; MacGown, J. A.; Adams, B. J.; Parys, K. A.; Strecker, R. M.; Hooper-Bui, L. (2012), "First Record of Pyramica epinotalis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) for the United States", Psyche: A Journal of Entomology 2012: 1, doi:10.1155/2012/850893  Please check the source for the exact licensing terms.
  • This article incorporates text from a scholarly publication published under a copyright license that allows anyone to reuse, revise, remix and redistribute the materials in any form for any purpose: Longino, J. T. (2013), "A revision of the ant genus Octostruma Forel 1912 (Hymenoptera, Formicidae)", Zootaxa 3699: 1–61, doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3699.1.1  Please check the source for the exact licensing terms.