Dacia 1300

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Dacia 1300
Dacia 1300.JPG
Overview
Manufacturer Dacia
Production 1969–2004
Model years 1969–1979
1980–1983
1984–1989
1990–1993
1994–1999
2000–2004
Assembly Mioveni, Romania
Body and chassis
Class Large family car (Dacia 1300)
Small family car (Dacia 1310)
Body style 4-door saloon
5-door estate
2-door coupé
2-door pick up (Dacia Pick-Up)
Layout Front-engine, front-wheel-drive
Related Renault 12
Powertrain
Engine 1.2 L I4 (gasoline)
1.3 L I4 (gasoline)
1.4 L I4 (gasoline)
1.6 L I4 (gasoline)
Transmission 4-speed manual
5-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,441 mm (96.1 in)
Length 4,340 mm (170.9 in) (1300-saloon)
4,348 mm (171.2 in) (1310-saloon)
4,404 mm (173.4 in) (estate)
4,148 mm (163.3 in) (coupé)
Width 1,636 mm (64.4 in)
Height 1,435 mm (56.5 in) (1300-saloon)
1,355 mm (53.3 in) (1310-saloon)
1,455 mm (57.3 in) (estate)
1,250 mm (49.2 in) (coupé)
Curb weight 930 kg (2,050 lb) (1300-saloon)
960 kg (2,120 lb) (1310-saloon)
1,000 kg (2,200 lb) (estate)
900 kg (2,000 lb) (coupé)
Chronology
Predecessor None
Successor Dacia Logan

The Dacia 1300 (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈdat͡ʃia]) was a car manufactured during the Cold War by Romanian auto marque Dacia. "1300" represents the car's engine displacement. The first Dacia 1300 left the assembly line on 23 August 1969. On 21 July 2004 the last Dacia 1310 (saloon version), number 1,959,730, rolled out the gates of the Mioveni production facility, just one month before their 35th anniversary.[1]

History[edit]

Further information: Automobile Dacia: History

Dacia 1300[edit]

Dacia acquired the tooling and basic designs of the Renault 12.[2] Most of the resulting automobiles were sold to consumers in the Communist Eastern bloc; in export markets, the car was also known as the Dacia Denem.

Minor cosmetic changes were made every few years in an effort to increase the public's interest in purchasing a newer model, but the main design features of the car remained the same year after year, quickly rendering it outdated: most of the technological improvements made during the years the car was produced, such as air conditioning and anti-lock brakes, were never offered.

In addition to the sedan and wagon versions of the original, there was also a coupé utility version, Dacia 1302.

Dacia 1310 series[edit]

Dacia 1310 station wagon
A Dacia 1310 in North Korea

In 1979, Dacia presented the 1310, a revised version of the 1300, at the Bucharest Auto Show.[3][4]

In 1979, the sedan 1310 was launched, followed by an estate and van the next year.[5] New versions of Dacia Pick-Up were introduced starting 1981. In 1983 the whole range was facelifted for the 1984 model year.[6] A coupé version of the car, the 1410 Sport, with two doors and a lowered roof, was also released in 1983.[7][8] In 1985 the drop-side coupé utility (pick up) was introduced and in 1987 the hatchback Dacia 1320.[9] In 1989 the production for the facelifted 1310 sedan, van and estate was over, although the pick up continued until 1990. The 1320 stopped in 1990.

In 1989, a new generation Dacia 1310 was launched in estate and sedan versions. It was a minor modification of the previous generation with new headlights. The hatchback named Dacia 1325 Liberta was introduced in 1990.[10] The 1310 van was launched in 1990 and the coupé utility (pickup) versions in 1992. A double cab version of the pickup was introduced, and later also a king cab version. The fully facelifted Dacia 1310 was introduced in 1993. In the same time the facelifted 1325 Liberta was introduced.

The last generation 1310 was introduced in 1998, after the old one was dropped in early 1998. The hatchback version named Liberta was dropped in 1996. The production for the sedan and the estate 1310 was over in 2004. The van version production stopped in 2004. The coupe utility versions were dropped in December 2006. The car that succeeded Dacia 1310 is the Dacia Logan.

As an effort to keep up with modern standards, the last version was equipped with fuel injection system and catalyser, still achieving only Euro2 standards.

Dacia was never a high comfort nor a high performance car. However, it had relatively low fuel consumption, it was easy to maintain and it was simple and reliable.

Engines[edit]

Name Capacity Type Power Torque Top speed Acceleration 0–100 km/h Combined consumption
103.00
1210
1,185 cc 8 valves OHV 48 hp (36 kW; 49 PS) at 5250 rpm 80 N·m (59 lb·ft) at 3000 rpm
810.99
1300
1,289 cc 8 valves OHV 54 hp (40 kW; 55 PS) at 5250 rpm 96 N·m (71 lb·ft) at 3300 rpm 140 km/h (87 mph) 17.5 s 8 L/100 km (35 mpg-imp; 29 mpg-US)
102.00
1410
1,397 cc 8 valves OHV 62 hp (46 kW; 63 PS) at 5250 rpm 102 N·m (75 lb·ft) at 3000 rpm 145 km/h (90 mph) 17.0 s 7.8 L/100 km (36 mpg-imp; 30 mpg-US)
1.4 Li
1410
1,397 cc 8 valves OHV 62 hp (46 kW; 63 PS) at 52500 rpm 102 N·m (75 lb·ft) at 3000 rpm 142 km/h (88 mph) 17.0 s 7.7 L/100 km (37 mpg-imp; 31 mpg-US)
1.6 1,557 cc 8 valves OHV 72 hp (54 kW; 73 PS) at 5000 rpm 125 N·m (92 lb·ft) at 2500 rpm 150 km/h (93 mph) 15.6 s 7.9 L/100 km (36 mpg-imp; 30 mpg-US)

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Maşina nr. 1.959.730". Automobileromanesti.ro. 21 July 2004. Retrieved 21 November 2010. 
  2. ^ "History of Dacia 1300". Romaniancars.ro. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 
  3. ^ "Dacia 1310 specifications". Carfolio.com. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 
  4. ^ "Dacia 1210 specifications". Carfolio.com. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 
  5. ^ "Dacia 1310 Break specifications". Carfolio.com. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 
  6. ^ Dumitru, Lazăr. "Modelele Dacia în 1984". Autoturism (11/1983): p. 4. 
  7. ^ "Dacia 1410 Sport". Autoevolution.com. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 
  8. ^ Dochia, Vasile. "Am condus Dacia 1410 Sport". Autoturism (6/1983): p. 5–6. 
  9. ^ "Dacia 1320". Autoevolution.com. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 
  10. ^ "Dacia 1325 Liberta". Autoevolution.com. Retrieved 20 October 2010. 

References[edit]

  • Mondiru, Corneliu (1990). Autoturisme Dacia. Editura Tehnică Publishing. ISBN 973-31-0218-0

External links[edit]