Dadasaheb Phalke Award

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Dadasaheb Phalke Award
Type National
Category Indian Cinema
Description Lifetime Achievement Award
Instituted 1969
First awarded 1969
Last awarded 2013
Total awarded 45
Awarded by Directorate of Film Festivals
Cash award INR1,000,000 (US$17,000)
Medal Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus)
First awardee(s) Devika Rani
Recent awardee(s) Gulzar

The Dadasaheb Phalke Award is India's highest award in cinema. It is presented annually at the National Film Awards ceremony by the Directorate of Film Festivals, an organisation set up by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. The recipient is honoured for their "outstanding contribution to the growth and development of Indian cinema"[1] and is selected by a committee consisting of eminent personalities from the Indian film industry.[2] As of 2014, the award comprises a Swarna Kamal (Golden Lotus) medallion, a shawl, and a cash prize of INR1,000,000 (US$17,000).[3]

First presented in 1969, the award was introduced by the Government of India to commemorate Dadasaheb Phalke's contribution to Indian cinema.[4] Phalke (1870–1944), who is popularly known as and often regarded as "the father of Indian cinema", was an Indian film-maker who directed India's first full-length feature film, Raja Harishchandra (1913).[1]

The first recipient of the award was actress Devika Rani, who was honoured at the 17th National Film Awards. As of 2013, there have been 45 awardees. Among those, actor Prithviraj Kapoor is the sole posthumous recipient.[5] His actor-filmmaker son, Raj Kapoor, accepted the award on his behalf at the 19th National Film Awards in 1971 and was himself a recipient in 1987 at the 35th National Film Awards ceremony.[6][7][a] Bommireddy Narasimha Reddy (1974) and Bommireddy Nagi Reddy (1986);[10] Lata Mangeshkar (1989) and Asha Bhosle (2000) along with Baldev Raj Chopra (1998) and Yash Chopra (2001) are the siblings who have won the award.[11][12] The most recent recipient of the award is poet, lyricist, and filmmaker Gulzar who was honoured at the 61st National Film Awards ceremony.[3]

Recipients[edit]

A Black and White photo of Dadasaheb Phalke looking at the filmstrip
Dadasaheb Phalke, often credited as "the father of Indian cinema", made India's first full-length feature Raja Harishchandra (1913).
List of award recipients by year[1]
Year
(Ceremony)
Image Recipient Film industry Notes
1969
(17th)
Devika Rani in Achhut Kanya (1936).jpg Devika Rani Hindi Widely acknowledged as "the first lady of Indian cinema",[13] the actress debuted in Karma (1933), which was the first Indian English-language film and the first Indian film to feature an on-screen kiss.[14] She also founded the first Indian public limited film company, Bombay Talkies, in 1934.[15]
1970
(18th)
 – Birendranath Sircar Bengali The founder of two production companies, International Filmcraft and New Theatres, Sircar is considered to be one of the pioneers of Indian cinema. He also built two cinema theatres in Calcutta, one for screening Bengali films and one for Hindi films.[16]
1971
(19th)
Prithviraj Kapoor in Sinkandar (1941).jpg Prithviraj Kapoor [b] Hindi Kapoor began his acting career in theatres and starred in India's first sound film, Alam Ara (1931). He founded Prithvi Theatre, a travelling theatre company in 1944 "to promote Hindi stage productions".[5]
1972
(20th)
Pankaj Mullick.jpg Pankaj Mullick  • Bengali
 • Hindi
A composer, singer and actor, Mullick began his career providing background music by conducting live orchestras during the screening of silent films.[17] He is best known for Mahishasuramardini, a radio musical composed in 1931.[18]
1973
(21st)
Sulochana Indira M.A. (cropped).jpg Ruby Myers (Sulochana) Hindi One of the highest-paid actresses of her time, Sulochana made her debut with Veer Bala (1925) and is considered to be "the first sex symbol of Indian cinema".[19]
1974
(22nd)
 – Bommireddy Narasimha Reddy Telugu The director of fifteen feature films in Telugu, Reddy was the first Indian film personality to be honoured with a Doctor of Letters and also the first to receive the Padma Bhushan, the third-highest civilian award in India.[20]
1975
(23rd)
Dhirendranath Ganguly.jpg Dhirendra Nath Ganguly Bengali Considered one of the founders of Bengali film industry, Ganguly debuted as an actor in Bilat Ferat (1921). He established three production companies - Indo British Film Company (1918), Lotus Film Company (1922) and British Dominion Films Studio (1929) - to direct several Bengali films.[21]
1976
(24th)
Kanan Devi 1937.jpg Kanan Devi Bengali Acknowledged as "the first lady of Bengali cinema", Kanan Devi made her acting debut in silent films in the 1920s. She also sang songs written by Rabindranath Tagore and was a producer with her film company, Shrimati Pictures.[22]
1977
(25th)
 – Nitin Bose  • Bengali
 • Hindi
A cinematographer, director and screenwriter, Bose is noted for introducing playback singing to Indian cinema in 1935 through his Bengali film Bhagya Chakra and its Hindi remake Dhoop Chhaon.[23][24]
1978
(26th)
 – Raichand Boral  • Bengali
 • Hindi
Considered one of the pioneers of Indian film music, Boral was a music director who, in collaboration with director Nitin Bose, introduced the system of playback singing in Indian cinema.[25]
1979
(27th)
Sohrab Modi in Prithvi Vallabh (1943) 1 (cropped).jpg Sohrab Modi Hindi An actor and film-maker, Modi is credited with bringing Shakespearean classics to Indian cinema and was noted for his delivery of Urdu dialogue.[26]
1980
(28th)
P. Jairaj in Magroor (1950).jpg Paidi Jairaj  • Hindi
 • Telugu
Initially having worked as a body double, actor-director Jairaj is known for his portrayal of Indian historical characters and was involved in instituting the Filmfare Awards.[27]
1981
(29th)
Naushadsaab1.jpg Naushad Hindi Music director Naushad debuted with Prem Nagar (1940),[28] and is credited with introducing the technique of sound mixing to Indian cinema.[29]
1982
(30th)
 – L. V. Prasad  • Hindi
 • Tamil
 • Telugu
Actor-director-producer L. V. Prasad has the distinction of acting in the first talkie films produced in three languages: the Hindi Alam Ara, Tamil Kalidas and Telugu Bhakta Prahlada, all released in 1931.[30] He founded Prasad Studios in 1965 and the Colour Film Laboratory in 1976.[31] Prasad Studios has produced over 150 film in various Indian languages.[32]
1983
(31st)
Durga Khote Amar Jyoti.jpg Durga Khote  • Hindi
 • Marathi
Having acted in the first Marathi-language talkie Ayodhyecha Raja (1932), Khote is considered a pioneer among women in Indian cinema.[33] She set up two production companies, Fact Films and Durga Khote Productions, which produced short films and documentaries.[34]
1984
(32nd)
SatyajitRay.jpg Satyajit Ray Bengali Having debuted as a director with Pather Panchali (1955),[35] the film-maker Ray is credited with bringing world recognition to Indian cinema.[36]
1985
(33rd)
 – V. Shantaram  • Hindi
 • Marathi
Actor and film-maker V. Shantaram produced and directed India's first colour film, Sairandhri (1931).[37] He also produced and direct the first Marathi-language talkie, Ayodhyecha Raja (1932), and was associated with nearly 100 films over 50 years.[38]
1986
(34th)
 – B. Nagi Reddy Telugu Reddy produced more than 50 films, beginning in the 1950s. He established Vijaya Vauhini Studios which was at that time the biggest film studio in Asia.[10]
1987
(35th)
Raj Kapoor In Aah (1953).png Raj Kapoor Hindi Often revered as "The Show Man",[39] actor and film-maker Kapoor's performance in the Hindi film Awara (1951) was ranked as one of the top ten greatest performances of all time by Time magazine in 2010.[40]
1988
(36th)
Ashok Kumar in Kismet1.jpg Ashok Kumar Hindi Popularly known as "Dadamoni" (the grand old man), Kumar is noted for his roles in Achhut Kannya (1936), Bandhan (1940) and Kismet (1943), the first blockbuster in Indian cinema.[41]
1989
(37th)
Lata Mangeshkar - still 29065 crop.jpg Lata Mangeshkar  • Hindi
 • Marathi
Widely credited as the "nightingale of India",[42] playback singer Mangeshkar started her career in the 1940s and has sung songs in over 36 languages.[43]
1990
(38th)
A.Nageswara Rao.jpg Akkineni Nageswara Rao Telugu Having debuted in Dharma Pathini (1941), Akkineni Nageswara Rao acted in more than 250 films, mostly in the Telugu language.[44]
1991
(39th)
 – Bhalji Pendharkar Marathi Film-maker Pendharkar started his career in the 1920s and produced more than 60 Marathi films and eight Hindi films. He has been widely recognised for the historical and social narratives depicted in these films.[45]
1992
(40th)
Dr. Bhupen Hazarika, Assam, India.jpg Bhupen Hazarika Assamese Popularly referred to as "the Bard of Brahmaputra", musician Hazarika is best known for his folk songs and ballads sung in the Assamese language.[46]
1993
(41st)
 – Majrooh Sultanpuri Hindi Lyricist Sultanpuri penned his first Hindi song for Shahjehan (1946) and wrote around 8000 songs for over 350 Hindi films.[47]
1994
(42nd)
Dilip Kumar 2006.jpg Dilip Kumar Hindi Debuting in Jwar Bhata (1944), the "Tragedy King" Dilip Kumar acted in more than 60 Hindi films in a career that spanned over six decades.[48]
1995
(43rd)
Rajkumar Kannada.jpg Rajkumar Kannada In a career spanning over 45 years, Rajkumar acted in more than 200 Kannada-language films and also won a National Film Award for Best Male Playback Singer in 1992.[49]
1996
(44th)
Sivaji Ganesan cropped.jpg Sivaji Ganesan Tamil Ganesan debuted as an actor in Parasakthi (1952) and went on to appear in more than 300 films. He is known for his "expressive and resonant voice".[50]
1997
(45th)
 – Kavi Pradeep Hindi Best known for the patriotic song "Aye Mere Watan Ke Logo", lyricist Pradeep wrote around 1700 songs, hymns and fiery nationalistic poems, including the lyrics for more than 80 Hindi films.[51]
1998
(46th)
B.R.Chopra.jpg B. R. Chopra Hindi Film-maker B. R. Chopra established his own production house, B. R. Films, in 1956,[52] and is best known for the films such as Naya Daur (1957) and Hamraaz (1967), as well as the TV series Mahabharat based on the similarly-titled epic of Hindu literature.[53]
1999
(47th)
 – Hrishikesh Mukherjee Hindi Having directed 45 Hindi films, film-maker Mukherjee is credited with popularising "middle-of-the-road cinema" through films like Anuradha (1960), Anand (1971) and Gol Maal (1979).[54]
2000
(48th)
Asha Bhosle - still 47160 crop.jpg Asha Bhosle  • Hindi
 • Marathi
A playback singer of "extraordinary range and versatility",[55] Bhosle began her singing career in 1948 and is acknowledged by The Guinness Book of World Records as the "most recorded artist in music history".[56]
2001
(49th)
Yash Chopra.JPG Yash Chopra Hindi The founder of Yash Raj Films, Chopra debuted as a director with Dhool Ka Phool (1959). He directed 22 Hindi films.[57]
2002
(50th)
Dev Anand still5.jpg Dev Anand Hindi Widely revered as "evergreen star of Hindi cinema",[58] actor and film-maker Anand co-founded Navketan Films in 1949 and produced 35 films.[59]
2003
(51st)
Mrinal-sen.jpg Mrinal Sen Bengali Regarded as one of "India's most important film-makers",[60] Sen debuted as a director with Raat Bhore (1955) and made 27 films in 50 years.[61]
2004
(52nd)
Adoorgopalakrishnan.JPG Adoor Gopalakrishnan Malayalam Credited with pioneering the new wave cinema movement in Malayalam cinema, director Gopalakrishnan won the National Film Award for Best Direction for his debut film, Swayamvaram (1972). He has been acclaimed for his "ability to portray complex problems in a simplistic way".[62]
2005
(53rd)
Shyam Benegal.jpg Shyam Benegal Hindi Benegal started his career by making advertising films. He directed his first feature film, Ankur, in 1973. His films have focused on women and their rights.[63]
2006
(54th)
 – Tapan Sinha  • Bengali
 • Hindi
Film-maker Sinha debuted as a director in 1954 and made more than 40 feature films in the Bengali, Hindi and Oriya languages. Most of the films addressed problems faced by ordinary people.[64]
2007
(55th)
Manna-dey.jpg Manna Dey  • Bengali
 • Hindi
In a career spanning over five decades, playback singer Dey sang over 3500 songs in various Indian languages. He is also credited with "pioneering a new genre by infusing Indian classical music in a pop framework".[65]
2008
(56th)
V K Murthy.jpg V. K. Murthy Hindi Best known for his collaboration with director Guru Dutt, cinematographer Murthy shot India's first cinemascope film, Kaagaz Ke Phool (1959).[66] He is best remembered for his lighting techniques in Pyaasa (1957), the "beam shot" from which is considered a classic in celluloid history.[67]
2009
(57th)
 – D. Ramanaidu Telugu In a career spanning over 50 years, D. Ramanaidu produced more than 130 films in various Indian languages but mostly Telugu.[68] He features in The Guinness Book of World Records for having produced films in nine languages.[69]
2010
(58th)
K Balachander.jpg K. Balachander  • Tamil
 • Telugu
Film-maker K. Balachander debuted as a director with Neerkumizhi (1965). He made more than 100 films in various Indian languages through his production house, Kavithalayaa Productions, established in 1981.[70]
2011
(59th)
Soumitra Chatterjee - Kolkata 2011-05-09 2856.JPG Soumitra Chatterjee Bengali Best known for his frequent collaboration with director Satyajit Ray,[71] Chatterjee debuted as an actor in Apur Sansar (1959) and worked with other directors, such as Mrinal Sen and Tapan Sinha, in a career lasting over 50 years.[72]
2012
(60th)
Pran (cropped).jpg Pran Hindi Known for his "compelling and highly stylized performances", actor Pran mainly played villainous characters in Hindi films during a career spanning over 50 years.[73]
2013
(61st)
Gulzar 2008 - still 38227.jpg Gulzar Hindi Gulzar began his career as a lyricist for Bandini (1963) and debuted as a director with Mere Apne (1971). Known for his successful collaboration with music directors like R. D. Burman and A. R. Rahman, Gulzar won several awards for his lyrics in a career spanning over 50 years.[74][75]

Explanatory notes[edit]

  1. ^ In 1972, Raj Kapoor received the posthumous award given to his father, Prithviraj Kapoor. However, on 1 May 1988, when he was being conferred the award by the then President of India, R. Venkataraman, Kapoor had an asthmatic attack and was rushed in the President's ambulance. Kapoor died a month later on 2 June 1988.[8][9]
  2. ^ Indicates a posthumous win

References[edit]

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Bibliography[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]