Dade-Collier Training and Transition Airport

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Coordinates: 25°51′42″N 080°53′49″W / 25.86167°N 80.89694°W / 25.86167; -80.89694

Dade-Collier Training and Transition Airport
IATA: TNTICAO: KTNTFAA LID: TNT
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Miami-Dade County
Operator Miami-Dade Aviation Department (MDAD)
Serves Miami, Florida
Elevation AMSL 13 ft / 4 m
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
9/27 10,499 3,200 Asphalt
Statistics (2001)
Aircraft operations 14,468
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1]

Dade-Collier Training and Transition Airport (IATA: TNTICAO: KTNTFAA LID: TNT) is a public airport located 36 miles (58 km) west of the central business district of Miami, in Collier County, Florida, United States. It is owned by Miami-Dade County and operated by the Miami-Dade Aviation Department.[1] The airport is on the Tamiami Trail near the border between Miami-Dade and Collier counties in central South Florida.

This isolated airport, located within the Florida Everglades, was originally planned to be the largest airport in the world. Begun in 1968, the Everglades Jetport was to be a six-runway airport for supersonic aircraft. Because of environmental concerns, construction was halted after the completion of just one runway. The facility remains in use today as an aviation training facility.[2]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Dade-Collier Training and Transition Airport covers an area of 24,960 acres (10,100 ha), which contains one asphalt paved runway (9/27) measuring 10,499 × 150 ft (3,200 × 46 m). For 2001, the airport had 14,468 general aviation aircraft operations, an average of 39 per day.[1]

Accidents[edit]

On January 22, 2008, a helicopter practicing maneuvers at the airport crashed, killing both occupants. A preliminary report stated the craft was seen practicing take-offs and landings when it suddenly flipped upside down and crashed, causing the helicopter to explode on impact.

Automobile racing[edit]

High-speed automobile events have been held here because the runway is two miles long. This allows exotic cars to break the 200 miles per hour (320 km/h) barrier, a pinnacle for street vehicles. Events in 2009, 2010 and 2011 have been held here.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c FAA Airport Master Record for TNT (Form 5010 PDF), effective 2007-10-25
  2. ^ [1] Abandoned & Little-Known Airfields, retrieved July 24, 2007.

External links[edit]