Dai Thomas

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For other people named Dai Thomas, see Dai Thomas (disambiguation).
For the rugby league footballer of the 1900s for Other Nationalities, and Oldham, see Dai Thomas (rugby league). For the rugby league footballer of the 1900s for Wales, Halifax, and Mid-Rhondda, see David Thomas (rugby league). For the rugby union footballer of the 1900s and '10s for Wales, Pontarddulais RFC, Gowerton RFC, Dunvant RFC, and Swansea RFC, see David John Thomas.
Dai Thomas
Full name David John Thomas
Place of birth Swansea,[1] Wales
Occupation(s) Police officer
Rugby union career
Playing career
Position Lock
Amateur clubs
Years Club / team
1930-1935
?
Swansea RFC
Glamorgan Police
National team(s)
Years Club / team Caps (points)
1930–1935 Wales[2] 11 (0)

David 'Dai' Thomas (30 March 1909 – ?) was a Welsh rugby union lock who played international rugby for Wales and club rugby for Swansea. During the 1934/35 season, Thomas was captain of the Swansea first XV.

Rugby career[edit]

Thomas first played for Wales during the 1930 Five Nations Championship against Scotland at Murrayfield. Wales lost by a last minute dropped goal, but Thomas was back for the very next match of the tournament against Ireland, but missed the final, bruising game against France, since referred to as the 'Battle of Colombes'. Thomas was failed to be selected for the entire 1931 Championship, but during that time was amongst the Swansea team that faced the touring South Africans.

Thomas was not selected for the Welsh international against the Springboks, but represented his country for all three games of the 1932 Home Nations Championship before sporadic appearances over the next two years that saw only two caps. Thomas managed to regain his position in 1935 and played all three games under the captaincy of Claude Davey.

International matches played[edit]

Wales[3]

Biography[edit]

  • Smith, David; Williams, Gareth (1980). Fields of Praise: The Official History of The Welsh Rugby Union. Cardiff: University of Wales Press. ISBN 0-7083-0766-3. 

References[edit]