Dallas Theater Center

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The Dallas Theater Center is a major regional theater in Dallas, Texas (United States). It produces classic, contemporary and new plays. The theater was based in the Kalita Humphreys Theater, a building designed by famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright, from 1959 to 2009. In 2009 it moved to the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in the Dallas Arts District.

History[edit]

The Dallas Theater Center's birth did not take place in a theater-poor city. The greatest actors and actresses of the times had toured through Dallas as soon as there were railroads to bring them. There were "opera" houses, then real theaters with orchestra pits and production facilities for vaudeville which, when vaudeville was replaced by motion pictures, were available to resident or touring theater companies. It is probably impossible to list accurately the number of theater groups and organizations of all degrees of professionalism, which have lived and died in this city. It is certainly impossible to overestimate their value to the life of Dallas.

The Dallas Little Theater, founded in 1920, rode the crest of the vogue for community theater, built its own facility, and before its final curtain in 1943, twice captured the nation's major annual award for the Best Little Theater in the United States. Margo Jones arrived in 1946 to open her innovative theater-in-the-round and it was in full bloom in 1954.

That was the year Beatrice Handel moved to Dallas from Cleveland, determined to organize a civically supported theater oriented to presenting fine drama and teaching people how to do it. Margo Jones chose to concentrate solely on production; no other active Dallas theater group would buy Mrs. Handel's concept. But John Rosenfield did. He was the powerful amusements editor for The Dallas Morning News and he was just as interested in making art happen in his native city as he was in covering it. He called a meeting of ten people on Mrs. Handel's porch on August 19, 1954. Less than a week later a second meeting took place. The Dallas Theater Center, as it later became known, was conceived.

Kalita Humphreys Theater

That its gestation took five years became only a footnote in history. Its importance lies in the fact that after the long and tortuous years of securing the land, negotiating and working with the architect and actually getting the building built, support for the theater was even stronger than it had been in the beginning. Timing was its blessing. The business and personal leadership for this theater was at hand, ready to be called. Robert Stecker demonstrated that leadership shortly after he was elected president of the board. Retired from his executive position with Sanger Brothers (the great department store and another Dallaspillar), he came to devote all his time to the Dallas Theater Center. Variations of this same kind of passion have illuminated every Theater Center board since. The services of the architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, were not difficult to procure. If Dallas had the money, he said, he would design the theater. He was delighted with the site and for him the project would mean the triumphant realization of a plan he had first conceived in 1915, but for which two cities had not had produced in funding.

The building, which came to be known as the Kalita Humphreys Theater, was a tour de force for Wright and a coup for the city. It was well worth the money and the effort. The stunning building, set in among the trees on a steep slope above Turtle Creek, was full of elegant spaces and filled with intricate Wrightian detail. Wright said proudly that there was not a right angle in it. It brought renown to the city and satisfaction to the populace. It was not a particularly efficient building for theater production.

Finding a new director was, surprisingly, the easiest part. The presumption was that this name, too, would be a celebrated import. But theater experts in the East, who the search committee members consulted, sent them home saying the best bet was in their own backyard. Beatrice Handel's idea had been to create a civically-supported theater, to present fine performances and to train people to do it. As head of the drama department at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, Paul Baker was building a growing reputation doing almost exactly that.

Paul Baker was brilliant, stubborn and an educator to the core. The principle of an educational/professional theater in which everyone did everything was his article of faith and he never abandoned it. It served the theater well for many years. Baker never favored union affiliation, feeling it would threaten this kind of freedom. But new winds blowing through regional theaters everywhere in the 1980s compelled some accommodation. He signed, without enthusiasm, a League of Regional Theaters contract which allowed guest appearances by Equity actors although it would put limits on backstage activities. Another unwelcome development nationwide was the new collegial status between artistic and managing directors, dividing the business and artistic pursuits of the theater which, in the Baker concept, remained as a single element. Paul Baker left the Dallas Theater Center in the spring of 1982.

Longtime DTC company member Mary Sue Jones served as interim artistic director during the year-long search for Baker's replacement. An actress and director, Jones was a colleague of Paul Baker's at Baylor, migrating with him to DTC. She became his associate artistic director in 1980, and co-artistic director in 1981. When a new artistic director was identified in 1983, Mary Sue left DTC. She was the only female artistic director in the theater's history.

The catholicity of programming, a hallmark of the Baker era, would be continued by his successors. Dallas audiences may well have seen, over the past 50 years, as broad a range of new and old, conventional and innovative theater in uninterrupted seasons by one organization as any city—certainly any of comparable size—in the country.

Baker's successors have built on what he achieved but moved in a direction that reflected the newcomer from the outside. Adrian Hall, the first, was hardly that — he was a native of Van, Texas, and had worked at the Alley Theatre in Houston and with Margo Jones. But his national reputation rested principally on his work with the Trinity Square Repertory Theatre, which he had founded in Providence, Rhode Island, 21 years before—a position he retained when he came to Dallas. With his managing director, Peter Donnelly, fresh from the Seattle Repertory Theater, Hall first addressed the most pressing physical needs of the theater: a renovation of the original Wright building to improve the backstage area, the basement floor facilities and the traffic flow; to find or build a second playing house with wide open space to accommodate innovative productions; to develop broader audiences and to keep more actors working with simultaneous or overlapping play runs.

The Arts District Theater, designed by Hall's associate, the distinguished stage designer Eugene Lee, opened in 1984 and turned out to be an engaging metal barn which adapts to virtually any staging a director may devise. It was the most flexible performance facility in the country at the time. The space was closed in the spring of 2005.

The idea of a permanent company was another major priority and Hall assembled DTC's company by bringing some people from Trinity Repertory, using some local actors and importing others. He opened with a brilliant production of Brecht's Galileo in the Kalita HumphreysTheater and, as soon as he could, staged his own adaptation of the Robert Penn Warren novel All The King's Men, which inaugurated most of the facilities the new Arts District house could provide. By the time Hall left in 1989, he had established a new philosophy of professionalism and a stable company. He had produced a strong range of highly accomplished seasons. He also promoted a bright, ambitious and able young director to be his artistic associate. Ken Bryant was the unanimous choice of the board to be the Center's fourth artistic director.

Bryant was electric. He had a solid relationship with the acting company. He had a warm way with people and sensed the importance of making himself a presence in the Dallas community. Ken was always interested in learning and was already very good at what he did. A tragic mishap ended his life less than a year after he took the job.

Everyone soldiered ahead, led by managing director Jeff West and interim artistic consultant Gregory Poggi, but the situation required a season of guest directors. The Hall company dispersed and the previous sense of union and continuity began to unravel.

When Richard Hamburger not much older than Bryant and with a solid set of directing credits from all over the country, was named artistic director in 1992, he faced some of the same problems Hall had met, as well as a few new ones. Hamburger had served for five years as artistic director of the Portland Stage Company in Maine but he knew he would need time to lay out his seasons and assemble a profile of the Theater to match the times. He also knew what he wanted when he came to Dallas–-to work in a big, multicultural city where unselfconscious inclusion of the talents of diverse people would be a given in a theater where both writers and actors could be developed.

Joined by managing director Robert Yesselman, Hamburger soon introduced Dallas audiences to a broad range of new works such asSantos & Santos and Angels in America, and launched the very successful Big D Festival of the Unexpected. This informal and exciting assemblage of new (sometimes very new) works––presented not only on stage but in every corner of the Kalita Humphreys Theater––gave local writers, actors and performers an arena to present their work. One of Hamburger's greatest audience successes at the Theater Center was his innovative production of South Pacific. This conclusion to the 1998-1999 season broke all previous box office records and was enthusiastically received by Dallas citizens and critics alike.

Richard Hamburger renewed the Theater Center's commitment to reinterpreting the classics for modern audiences, and to discovering and developing thought-provoking new plays. Edith H. Love joined the Dallas Theater Center as managing director in 1997. She had long been recognized as one of the best theater managers in the country. Ms. Love and Mr. Hamburger worked together closely to ensure the continued financial and artistic success of the Dallas Theater Center, until her departure in 2002. In 2003, Mark Hadley, former General Manager of DTC, was appointed Managing Director.

During Hamburger's tenure as the Theater Center's fifth artistic leader the company saw some of its most provocative and important productions to date. Throughout this period many distinct and compelling programs were introduced such as The Big D Festival of the Unexpected and the new works series FRESH INK/Forward Motion. Notable in the list of his artistic achievements was the creation of the DTC Internship Program, a nationally recognized forum for training young theater artists. Under Hamburger's leadership, DTC's educational outreach flagship program Project Discovery celebrated its 20th consecutive season in 2006-2007. More than 200,000 middle and high school students from across North Texas have attended mainstage productions at Dallas Theater Center through this outstanding program. In 2007 after 15 years, Richard Hamburger left DTC and was named artistic director emeritus.

Wyly Theatre

In September 2007, Kevin Moriarty became DTC's sixth artistic director, and he will lead Dallas Theater Center into its bright future in the Rem Koolhaus-designed Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre in the new Dallas Center for the Performing Arts, set to open in 2009. Moriarty brought with him an extensive resume of artistic achievement at such prestigious institutions as the Tony Award-winning Trinity Repertory Company in Providence Rhode Island, where he was an Associate Director; Brown University, where he was the founding head of the MFA Directing Program; and the Hangar Theatre in Ithaca, New York, where he was the Artistic Director for seven years. His artistic excellence, his commitment to education, his strong vision for the future of Dallas Theater Center, and his enthusiasm for building community connections make Kevin Moriarty the ideal person to lead DTC for many years.

The Dallas Theater Center, with its roots deeply implanted in the community, continues to grow in stature as one of the most exciting regional theaters in the country today. The Theater Center remains fully responsive to the time and place in which we live; to the issues that shape our lives and thoughts; and to the rhythms, images and contradictions of contemporary American life.

Productions[edit]

1959–1960

  • Of Time and the River by Thomas Wolfe, adapted by Eugene McKinney and Paul Baker. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Cross-Eyed Bear by Eugene McKinney. Directed by Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Mary Sue Fridge.
  • Our Town by Thornton Wilder. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Under Milk Wood by Dylan Thomas. Directed by Burgess Meredith.
  • A Solid House by Elena Garro. Directed by Juan Jose Gurrola.
  • The Bald Soprano by Eugène Ionesco, translated by Donlad M. Allen. Directed by Juan Jose Gurrola.
  • Hay Fever by Noël Coward. Directed by Dugald MacArthur.

1960–1961

  • Hay Fever by Noël Coward. Directed by Dugald MacArthur.
  • The Matchmaker by Thornton Wilder. Directed by Paul Baker, in association with Ken Latimer.
  • A Waltz in the Afternoon by Jason Miller. Directed by Paul Baker, in association with David Martin. World Premiere.
  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Mary Sue Fridge.
  • The Visit by Friedrich Dürrenmatt, adapted by Maurice Valency. Directed by Paul Baker in association with Gene Lindsey.
  • A Phoenix Too Frequent by Christopher Fry. Directed by Mary Sue Fridge.
  • The Chairs by Eugène Ionesco. Directed by Jan Kessler in association with Tom Hebert.
  • Shadow of an Eagle by Ramsey Yelvington. Directed by Dugald MacArthur. World Premiere.
  • The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. Directed by Ivan Rider.
  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • The Unicorn, the Gorgon, & the Manticore by Gian-Carlo Menotti.
  • Romanoff and Juliet by Peter Ustinov. Directed by Stan Fedyszyn, in association with Paul Baker.

1961–1962

  • Little Mary Sunshine. Book, lyrics, and music by Rick Besoyan. Directed by Ivan Rider.
  • Let the Dogs Bark by Sergio Vodanovic, translated by Lysander Kemp. Directed by Padro Mortheiro. American Premiere.
  • Joshua Beene and God by Clifford M. Sage and Hal Lewis. Based on the novel by Jewel Gibson, starring Burl Ives. Directed by Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • The Snow Queen. Book and lyrics by Emily Jefferson, music by Beatrice Gaspar. Based on the story by Hans Christian Andersen. Directed by Ruth Byers. World Premiere.
  • The Madwoman of Chaillot by Jean Giraudoux. Directed by Angna Enters.
  • The Crossing by Howard Fast. Directed by Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Naked to Mine Enemies by Charles W. Ferguson. Directed by Warren Hammack, in association with Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • The Women by Claire Booth Luce. Directed by David Pursley.
  • The Rivals by Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Directed by Robin Lovejoy.
  • Krapp's Last Tape by Samuel Beckett. Directed by Stan Fedyszyn.
  • The Man with a Flower in His Mouth by Luigi Pirandello. Directed by Stan Fedyszyn.
  • Village Wooing by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Stan Fedyszyn.
  • Mirror Under the Eagle by Phillip C. Lewis. Directed by Don Howell.

1962–1963

  • Sister by Glenn Allen Smith. Directed by Ivan Rider.
  • Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. Directed by David Martin.
  • The Women by Claire Booth Luce. Directed by David Pursley.
  • The Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum, adapted by Frank Gabrielson, music and lyrics by Harold Arlen and E. Y. Harburg. Directed by Ruth Byers.
  • As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner, adapted by Robert L. Flynn. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Maids by Jean Gênet. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Sandbox by Edward Albee. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Chairs by Eugène Ionesco, translated by Donald M. Allen. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Auntie Mame by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee, based on the novel by Patrick Dennis. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Warren Hammack.
  • Blood Wedding by Federico García Lorca, translated by James Graham Lujan and Richard O’Connell. Directed by Mary Bozeman Raines.
  • Under the Yum-Yum Tree by Lawrence Roman. Directed by Preston Jones.

1963–1964

  • The Firebugs by Max Frisch, translated by Mordecai Gorelik. Directed by Ken Latimer, in association with Paul Baker.
  • Can-Can. Music and lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Abe Burrows. Directed by Tom Hughes.
  • Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. Directed by I. Sheldon Aptekar.
  • Hip-Hop-A-Hare by Beatrice and Lester Gaspar, music by Beatrice Gaspar. Directed by Ruth Byers. World Premiere.
  • Medea by Robinson Jeffers, freely adapted from the Medea of Euripides. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • A Different Drummer by Eugene McKinney. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • The Tragedy of Thomas Andros by Ronald Wilcox. Directed by Ronald Wilcox, in association with Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • The Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov, translated by Stark Young. Directed by Warren Hammack.
  • Journey to Jefferson (formerly As I Lay Dying) by William Faulkner, adapted by Robert L. Flynn. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Night Must Fall by Emlyn Williams. Directed by Paul Baker and Kaki Dowling.
  • Come Blow Your Horn by Neil Simon. Directed by Ruth Byers, in association with Rita Barnes.

1964–1965

  • Of Thee I Sing. Book by George S. Kaufman and Morrie Ryskind, music and lyrics by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin. Directed by David Pursley.
  • Harvey by Mary Chase. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. Directed by Randy Moore.
  • The Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Peter Pan by Sir James M. Barrie. Directed by Ruth Byers.
  • A Different Drummer by Eugene McKinney. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • Long Day's Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • What Price Glory? by Maxwell Anderson and Laurence Stallings. Directed by Don Davlin, in association with Paul Baker.
  • Wheels A-Rollin’ by Sally Netzel. Directed by Robyn Flatt. World Premiere.
  • The Rivals by Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Directed by Robin Lovejoy.
  • The Days Between by Robert Anderson. Directed by Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • Mary, Mary by Jean Kerr. Directed by Warren Hammack.
  • The Marriage-Go-Round by Leslie Stevens. Directed by Lynn Trammell.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • Oh, Dad, Poor Dad, Mama's Hung You in the Closet and I’m Feeling so Sad by Arthur Kopit. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • The Typist by Murray Schisgal.
  • The Tiger by Murray Schisgal.
  • The Great God Brown by Eugene O’Neill.
  • Rain by John Colton and Clement Randolph, adapted from the story by Somerset Maugham.
  • Talk to Me Like the Rain and Let Me Listen by Tennessee Williams.
  • Something Unspoken by Tennessee Williams.
  • This Property Is Condemned by Tennessee Williams.
  • Epitaph by Randy Ford. World Premiere.
  • Never Mind Tomorrow by Dale Blair. World Premiere.
  • Telephones by Ronald Wilcox. World Premiere.
  • Riverwind. Book, music, and lyrics by John Jennings.

1965–1966

  • The Tempest by William Shakespeare. Sets and costumes designed by Bjørn Wiinblad. Directed by Paul Baker in association with Ken Latimer.
  • The Rivals by Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Directed by Robin Lovejoy.
  • Peter Pan by Sir James M. Barrie. Directed by Ruth Byers.
  • Oh, Dad, Poor Dad, Mama's Hung You in the Closet and I’m Feeling so Sad by Arthur Kopit. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. Directed by Warren Hammack.
  • The Physicists by Friedrich Dürrenmatt, adapted by James Kirkup. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • You Can’t Take It With You by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Creep Past the Mountain Lion by Clifford M. Sage and Hal Lewis. Directed by Preston Jones. World Premiere.
  • Rashomon by Fay and Michael Kanin, based on the stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa. Directed by Buddy Smith and Duk Hyung Yoo.
  • The Golden Warriors by Jay Dratler. Directed by Ryland Merkey, in association with Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • Who's Got the Pot?! by Plautus. Directed by Robyn Flatt.
  • Little Mary Sunshine. Book, lyrics, and music by Rick Besoyan. Directed by Ivan Rider.
  • The Absence of a Cello by Ira Wallach. Directed by John Figlmiller.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • A Mime Show by the Mime Group. World Premiere.
  • La Ronde by Arthur Schnitzier.
  • The Birthday Party by Harold Pinter. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • Sense and Nonsense by the Mime Group. World Premiere.
  • The House of Bernard Alba by Frederico García Lorca.
  • The Amorous Flea. Book by Jerry Devine, based on Molière's School for Wives. Music and lyrics by Bruce Montgomery.
  • The Dance by Claudette Gardner. World Premiere.
  • My Brother's Keeper by John Logan. World Premiere.
  • One Dead Indian by Randy Ford. World Premiere.
  • The Subject Was Roses by Frank D. Gilroy.

1966–1967

  • A Bug in Her Ear by Georges Feydeau, translated by Barnett Shaw. Directed by Jean-Pierre Granval, in association with Théâtre de France. American Premiere.
  • Blithe Spirit by Noël Coward. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, adapted by Sally Netzel, lyrics by Sally Netzel and Beatrice Gaspar, music by Beatrice Gaspar. Directed by Louise Mosley. World Premiere.
  • Journey to Jefferson (formerly As I Lay Dying) by William Faulkner. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • You Never Can Tell by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Anna Paul Rogers, in association with Sally Netzel.
  • The Tempest by William Shakespeare. Sets and costumes designed by Bjørn Wiinblad. Directed by Paul Baker in association with Ken Latimer.
  • Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. Directed by Randy Moore.
  • Luv by Murray Schisgal. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • The Caucasian Chalk Circle by Bertolt Brecht, English version by Eric Bentley. Directed by Harry Buckwitz.
  • Barefoot in the Park by Neil Simon. Directed by Preston Jones.
  • Ben Bagley's The Decline and Fall of the Entire World as Seen Through the Eyes of Cole Porter. Lyrics and music by Cole Porter, based on the revue by Ben Bagley. Directed by Paul Baker, in association with Raymond Allen.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • Tiny Alice by Edward Albee.
  • The Amorous Flea. Book by Jerry Devine, based on Molière's School for Wives. Music and lyrics by Bruce Montgomery.
  • The World of Carl Sandburg, adapted by Norman Corwin.
  • A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney.
  • Fantoccini by Sally Netzel. World Premiere.
  • R.U. Hungry by Randy Ford. World Premiere.
  • Look Back in Anger by John Osborne.

1967–1968

  • Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare. Directed by Norman Ayrton.
  • The Odd Couple by Neil Simon. Directed by James Nelson Harrell.
  • A Delicate Balance by Edward Albee. Directed by George Webby.
  • Pinocchio by Brian Way, with the collaboration of Warren Jenkins, adapted from the story by Carlo Collodi. Directed by Louise Mosley.
  • A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • Vasco by Georges Schehade, English version by Bernard Noble. Directed by Kosta Spaic. American Premiere.
  • The Latent Heterosexual by Paddy Chayefsky. Directed by Burgess Meredith. World Premiere.
  • Charley's Aunt by Brandon Thomas. Directed by Anna Paul Marsh-Neame.
  • Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters, adapted and arranged by Charles Aidman. Directed by Mike Dendy.
  • The Girl of the Golden West by David Belasco. Directed by Ken Latimer and Carleton Tanner.
  • Under the Yum-Yum Tree by Lawrence Roman. Directed by Preston Jones and Bob Baca.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • A Delicate Balance by Edward Albee.
  • Spoon River Anthology by Edgar Lee Masters. Conceived, adapted, and arranged by Charles Aidman. Directed by Mike Dendy.
  • The Private Ear by Peter Shaffer.
  • The Public Eye by Peter Shaffer.
  • The Knack by Ann Jellicoe.
  • Chamber Music by Arthur Kopit.
  • The Day It Rained Forever by Ray Bradbury.
  • The Finger Tomb by Ronald Wilcox. World Premiere.
  • Crime on Goat Island by Ugo Betti, translated by Henry Reed.

1968–1969

  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Hippolytus by Euripides, performed by the Piraikon Theatron. Directed by Dimitrios Rondiris.
  • Iphigenia in Aulis by Euripides, performed by the Piraikon Theatron. Directed by Dimitrios Rondiris.
  • H.M.S. Pinafore by W. S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan. Directed by Glenn Allen Smith. Musical directed by Raymond Allen.
  • Journey to Jefferson (formerly As I Lay Dying) by William Faulkner. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. Directed by Mike Dendy.
  • Rags to Riches by Aurand Harris, suggested by two Horatio Alger stories. Directed by Frank Schaefer.
  • The Star-Spangled Girl by Neil Simon. Directed by Anna Marsh-Neame.
  • A Gown for His Mistress by Georges Feydeau, translated by Barnett Shaw. Directed by Preston Jones. American Premiere.
  • You Can’t Take It With You by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Cactus Flower by Abe Burrows, based on a play by Pierre Barillet and Jean-Pierre Gredy. Directed by Sally Netzel.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • The Killing of Sister George by Frank Marcus.
  • War by Jean-Claude van Itallie.
  • Muzeeka by John Guare.
  • A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney.
  • Summertree by Ron Cowen.
  • Black Reflections in a White Eye by Sally Netzel, music by Raymond Allen. World Premiere.
  • The Process is the Product. Script by the performers. World Premiere.
  • Entertaining Mr. Sloane by Joe Orton.

1969–1970

  • The Homecoming by Harold Pinter. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Project III: Is Law in Order? by The Resident Company. Directed by Paul Baker and Mary Sue Jones. World Premiere.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by John Figlmiller, lyrics by Sally Netzel. Directed by John Figlmiller.
  • She Stoops to Conquer by Oliver Goldsmith. Directed by Kaki Dowling.
  • The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of The Marquis De Sade by Peter Weiss, English version by Geoffrey Skelton, verse adaptation by Adrian Mitchell. Directed by Harry Buckwitz.
  • Black Comedy by Peter Shaffer. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Greenski and the Hummingbird by James Nelson Harrell. Directed by James Nelson Harrell.
  • On The Harmfulness of Tobacco by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Michael Dendy.
  • The Top Loading Lover Libretto by Glenn Allen Smith, music by Raymond Allen. Directed by Glenn Allen Smith. World Premiere.
  • Little Murders by Jules Feiffer. Directed by Theodore Mann.
  • The Boys from Syracuse. Book by George Abbott, lyrics by Lorenz Hart, music by Richard Rodgers. Directed by David Pursley.
  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare. Directed by Paul Baker.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • The Promise by Aleksei Arbuzov, translated by Ariadne Nicolaeff.
  • Halfway Up the Tree by Peter Ustinov.
  • The Field by Michael Parriott. World Premiere.
  • Dear Liar adapted from the correspondence of Bernard Shaw and Mrs. Patrick Campbell by Jerome Kitty.
  • Lovers by Brain Friel.
  • The Nightwatchmen by Stratis Karris, translated by Evangelos Voutsinas. American Premiere.
  • A Day in the Death of Joe Egg by Peter Nichols.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Rumplestiltskin by Sally Netzel. World Premiere.
  • Pecos Bill by Deanna Dunagan. World Premiere.
  • Thumbelina written and arranged by Jerry Blatt.

THE JANUS PLAYERS

  • The Blacks by Jean Genet.
  • Happy Ending by Douglas Turner Wars.
  • Big Mama, Big Man by Donna Medcalf. World Premiere.

1970–1971

  • Farce ‘’N Flick by B. M. Svoboda, music by Raymond Allen. Directed by B. M. Svoboda. World Premiere.
  • Fantoccini by Sally Netzel. Directed by Frank Schaefer.
  • Hamlet ESP by William Shakespeare, adapted by Paul Baker. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Peter Pan by Sir James M. Barrie. Directed by Ruth Byers.
  • The Seagull by Anton Chekhov, translated by David Magarshak. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Harvey by Mary Chase. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. Directed by Paul Baker, in association with mKaki Dowling and David Ayers.
  • The Apple Tree by Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick, based on stories by Mark Twain, Frank R. Stockton, and Jules Feiffer. Directed by Lee Theodore.
  • Private Lives by Noël Coward. Directed by Rocco Bufano.
  • Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. Directed by Randy Moore.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • The Late Christopher Bean by Sidney Howard.
  • Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett.
  • Anna Christie by Eugene O’Neill.
  • Dear Liar. Adapted from the correspondence of Bernard Shaw and Mrs. Patrick Campbell by Jerome Kitty.
  • The Attendant by Stratis Karras, translated by Evangelos Voutsinas.
  • The Diary of a Madman by Nikolai Gogol, adapted by Don Eitner and Tom Troupe from an original translation by Rodney Patterson. American Premiere.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Cinderella by Sally Netzel. World Premiere.
  • Beauty and the Beast by Sally Netzel. World Premiere.
  • The Pied Piper of Hamlin. Book and lyrics by Evan Thompson and Joan Shepard, music by Joe Bousard.

THE JANUS PLAYERS

  • Antigone by Jean Anouilh, adapted by Lewis Galantiere.
  • Day of Absence by Douglas Turner Ward.

1971–1972

  • The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. Directed by Paul Baker, in association with Kaki Dowling and David Ayers.
  • The Lion in Winter by James Goldman. Directed by Don Eitner.
  • The School for Scandal by Richard Brinsley Sheriden. Directed by Campbell Thomas.
  • Snow White and Famous Fables. Script arranged by Stephanie Rich. Directed by Stephanie Rich, in association with Robyn Flatt. World Premiere.
  • J.B. by Archibald MacLeish. Directed by C. Bernard Jackson.
  • Lysistrata by Aristophanes, translated by Patric Dickinson. Directed by Takis Muzenidis.
  • Our Town by Thornton Wilder. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • The House of Blue Leaves by John Guare. Directed by Sally Netzel.
  • Wind in the Branches of the Sassafras by Rene de Obaldia, translated by Joseph Foster. Directed by Ryland Merkey. American Premiere.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • The Price by Arthur Miller. Directed by Preston Jones.
  • Exit the King by Eugène Ionesco.
  • Dear Love by Jerome Kitty. Directed by Preston Jones.
  • I’m Read, You’re Black by Lewis Cleckler. World Premiere.
  • Feathers by Kerry Newcomb. World Premiere.
  • Saloon by Sally Netzel. World Premiere.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Sleeping Beauty by Brian Way.
  • Jack and the Beanstalk by Sally Netzel. World Premiere.
  • Little Red Riding Hood, a Fable Theater production. World Premiere.
  • The Three Bears, a Fable Theater production. World Premiere.
  • The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. Book, lyrics, and music by Sam L. Rosen.
  • Goose on the Loose, a Fable Theater production. World Premiere.
  • Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, a Fable Theater production. World Premiere.

THE JANUS PLAYERS

  • Dracula by Hamilton Deane and John L. Balderston, adapted from the novel by Bram Stoker.
  • Shades of Black and Brown, an original musical by The Janus Players. World Premiere.
  • Ceremonies in Dark Old Men by Lonne Elder III. Directed by Reginald Montgomery
  • Frankenstein's Monster by Sally Netzel, adapted from the novel by Mary Shelley. Directed by Judith Davis. World Premiere.
  • La Conquista de Mexico by El Teatro De Campesino. Directed by Cecilia Flores.

1972–1973

  • The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-In-The-Moon Marigolds by Paul Zindel. Directed by Michael Dendy.
  • The Happy Hunter by Georges Feydeau, translated by Barnett Shaw. Directed by John Reich.
  • Life with Father by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse. Directed by David Pursley.
  • Summer and Smoke by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Mary Sue Jones.
  • Jabberwock by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. Directed by Jerome Lawrence. World Premiere.
  • How the Other Half Loves by Alan Ayckbourn. Directed by Sally Netzel.
  • Mary Stuart by Friedrich von Schiller, translated by Stephen Spender. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Night Watch by Lucille Fletcher. Directed by John Figlmiller.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • The Anniversary by Anton Chekhov, in English and Spanish (Spanish version adapted by Leo Lavandero).
  • The Marriage Proposal by Anton Chekhov, in English and Spanish (Spanish version adapted by Leo Lavandero).
  • Endgame by Samuel Beckett.
  • To Be Young, Gifted and Black. A portrait of Lorraine Hansberry in her own words, adapted by Robert Nemiroff.
  • Old Times by Harold Pinter.
  • Moon on a Rainbow Shawl by Errol John.
  • If You See Any Ladies by James Crump. World Premiere.
  • The Novitiates by Denise Chavez. World Premiere.
  • Quincunx by Celia Karston. World Premiere.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Heidi by Johanna Spyri, adapted by Lucille Miller.
  • Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne, adapted by Kristin Sergel.
  • The Red Shoes by Robin Short, based on the fairy tale by Hans Christian Andersen.
  • The Adventures of Raggedy Ann and Raggedy Andy by Johnny Gruell, adapted by Kevin Kelley. A Fable Theater production. World Premiere.
  • Tell Me a Story, a Fable Theater production. World Premiere.

THE JANUS PLAYERS

  • Day of Absence by Douglas Turner (tour).
  • The Marriage Proposal by Anton Chekhov, in English and Spanish (Spanish version adapted by Leo Lavandero).
  • The People Speak a collection of Black and Chicano poetry (tour). World Premiere.

1973–1974

  • John Brown's Body by Stephen Vincent Benét. Directed by Judith Davis.
  • Hadrian VII by Peter Luke, based on Hadrian the Seventh by Fr. Rolfe (Baron Corvo). Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare, music and lyrics by Randolph Tallman and Steven Mackenroth. Directed by Randolph Tallman and Steven Mackenroth. World Premiere.
  • The Crucible by Arthur Miller. Directed by Michael Dendy.
  • Jacques Brel is Alive and Well Living in Paris by Eric Blau and Mort Shuman, based on Brel's lyrics and commentary, music by Jacques Brel. Directed by Joe Bousard.
  • Jack Ruby, All-American Boy by John Logan, in association with Paul Baker. Directed by Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • Arsenic and Old Lace by Joseph Kesselring. Directed by Randolph Tallman.
  • Tobacco Road by Jack Kirkland, based on the novel by Erskine Caldwell. Directed by Ken Latimer.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • Getting to Know the Natives by Daniel Turner. World Premiere.
  • The Last Meeting of the Knights of the White Magnolia by Preston Jones. World Premiere.
  • Dear Luger by Kerry Newcomb. World Premiere.
  • Lu Ann Hampton Laverty Oberlander by Preston Jones. World Premiere.
  • Curious in L.A. by Glenn Allen Smith. World Premiere.
  • Fuse by Sally Netzel. World Premiere.
  • Enchanted Night by Slawomir Mrozek.
  • Charlie by Slawomir Mrozek.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Pinocchio by Brian Way, with the collaboration of Warren Jenkins, adapted from the story by Carlo Collodi.
  • The Christmas Nightingale by Phyllis Newman Groff.
  • Aesop's Falables. Book by Ed Graczyk, lyrics by Marty Conine and Ed Graczyk, music by Shirley Hansen.
  • Aladdin and His Wonderful Lamp, a Fable Theater production. World Premiere.

THE JANUS PLAYERS

  • Enchanted Night by Slawomir Mrozek.
  • Charlie by Slawomir Mrozek.

1974–1975

  • Jack Ruby, All-American Boy by John Logan, in association with Paul Baker. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Chemin de Fer by Georges Feydeau, translated by Barnett Shaw, adapted by Suzanne Grossman and Paxton Whitehead. Directed by David Pursley.
  • The Last Meeting of the Knights of the White Magnolia by Preston Jones. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Oldest Living Graduate by Preston Jones. Directed by Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • Lu Ann Hampton Laverty Oberlander by Preston Jones. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee. Directed by Jerome Lawrence.
  • Misalliance by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Linda Daugherty.
  • Journey to Jefferson (formerly As I Lay Dying) by William Faulkner. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Amorous Flea. Book by Jerry Devine, based on Molière's School for Wives. Music and lyrics by Bruce Montgomery. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Promenade, All! by David V. Robison. Directed by Randy Moore and Judith Davis.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • My Drinking Cousin by Frank Jarrett.
  • Why Don’t They Ever Talk About the First Mrs. Phipps? by Sue Ann Gunn. Directed by Lynn Trammell. World Premiere.
  • Puppy Doesn’t Live Here Anymore by Iris Rosofsky. World Premiere.
  • Sourwood Honey by T. Alan Doss. World Premiere.
  • La Turista by Sam Shepard.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Chi-Chin-Pui-Pui, adapted from Japanese folk tales by Kyo Ozawa, translated by Yoichi Aoki and T. Alan Doss. World Premiere.
  • Grimm's Fairy Tales, a Fable Theater production. World Premiere.
  • Hans Brinker and the Silver Skates by Charlotte B. Chorpenning.
  • King Midas and the Golden Touch by Louise Mosley. World Premiere.

1975–1976

  • Count Dracula by Ted Tiller, based on the novel by Bram Stoker. Directed by Judith Davis.
  • Saturday, Sunday, Monday by Eduardo De Filippo, English adaptation by Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall. Directed by David Healy.
  • Manny. Music by Randolph Tallman and Steven Mackenroth, lyrics by Glenn Allen Smith. Directed by Dolores Ferraro. World Premiere.
  • A Place on the Magdalena Flats by Preston Jones. Directed by Ken Latimer. World Premiere.
  • Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Directed by Robin Lovejoy.
  • Stillsong by Sallie Laurie. Directed by Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • Sherlock Holmes & the Curse of the Sign of Four by Dennis Rosa, based on the novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Sam by Sally Netzel. Directed by Bryan J. Reynolds. World Premiere.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • A Marvelous War by Charles Beachley III. World Premiere.
  • Standoff at Beaver and Pine by Sally Netzel. World Premiere.
  • Canzada and the Boys by Sam Havens. World Premiere.
  • Faces of U.S. by the Mime Troupe. World Premiere.
  • Mirror Under the Eagle by Phillip C. Lewis.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Lady Liberty, Celebration ’76 by the Mime Troupe. World Premiere.
  • Pocahantas by Aurand Harris.
  • The Adventures of Brer Rabbit. Book and lyrics by Pat Hale, music by Paul Spong, based on the stories by Joel Chandler.
  • Road to Yonder: The Boyhood Adventures of Abe Lincoln by Pamela Jensen, songs by Caroline Pines. World Premiere.

1976–1977

  • Sherlock Holmes & the Curse of the Sign of Four by Dennis Rosa, based on the novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Once in a Lifetime by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • Scapino! by Frank Dunlop and Jim Dale from Molière's Les Fourberies de Scapin. Directed by Robyn Flatt.
  • Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov, translated by Robert W. Corrigan. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Something's Afoot. Book by James McDonald, David Vos, and Robert Gerlach. Directed by John Henson. Music directed by Pam Nagle.
  • Santa Fe Sunshine by Preston Jones. Directed by John Logan. World Premiere.
  • Equus by Peter Shaffer. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • Absurd Person Singular by Alan Ayckbourn. Directed by Ken Latimer.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • Ladyhouse Blues by Kevin O’Morrison. World Premiere.
  • Kennedy's Children by Robert Patrick.
  • Get Happy! by John Heson, John Logan, Randolph Tallman, and Steven Mackenroth. World Premiere.
  • War Zone by Paul R. Bassett. World Premiere.
  • Hermit's Homage by Lewis Cleckler. World Premiere.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Marco Polo by Jonathan Levy.
  • Cinderella by the Mime Troupe. World Premiere.
  • Hansel and Gretel by the Mime Troupe. World Premiere.
  • The Tale of the Mouse by Anita Gustafson.
  • Sleeping Beauty by Brian Way.

1977–1978

  • Equus by Peter Shaffer. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • The Imaginary Invalid by Molière, translated by Alec Stockwell, music by Berthold Carriere. Directed by Albert Millaire.
  • Vanities by Jack Heifner. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • The Night of the Iguana by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Judith Davis.
  • Three Men on a Horse by John Cecil Holm and George Abbott. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Firekeeper by Mark Medoff. Directed by Paul Baker. World Premiere.
  • The Royal Family by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber. Directed by Ryland Merkey.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • Door Play by Sallie Laurie. World Premiere.
  • Cigarette Man by David Blomquist. World Premiere.
  • The Night Visit by Roy Hudson. World Premiere.
  • Lady Bug, Lady Bug, Fly Away Home by Mary Rohde. Directed by Chris Hendrie. World Premiere.
  • Inside the White Room by Paul R. Bassett. World Premiere.
  • Interweave developed by the Mime Act from a scenario by Robyn Flatt. World Premiere.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Equepoise. Book and lyrics by Phil Penningroth, music by Howard Quilling.
  • Snow White by the Mime Troupe.
  • The Tiger in Traction. Book and lyrics by Gifford Wingate, music by Robert R. Smith Jr.
  • The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. Book, lyrics, and music by Sam L. Rosen.

1978–1979

  • Remember by Preston Jones. Directed by Judith Davis.
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare. Directed by Randolph Tallman.
  • A Texas Trilogy by Preston Jones. Directed by Paul Baker.
  • The Devil's General by Carl Zuckmayer, translated by Ingrid Komar. Directed by Harry Buckwitz.
  • As You Like It by William Shakespeare. Directed by Ken Latimer.
  • Blood Money by M. G. Johnston, music composed by Jim Abbott. Directed by John Logan. World Premiere.
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Directed by Robyn Flatt.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • Attic Aphrodite by Sally Netzel. Directed by Robert A. Smith.
  • Years in the Making by Glenn Allen Smith. Directed by Ken Latimer.

MAGIC TURTLE

  • Raggedy Ann

1979–1980

  • A Man for All Seasons by Robert Bolt. Directed by Mary Sue Jones.
  • The Illusion: A Musical Theater of Marvels by Randolph Tallman, Steven Mackenroth, John Henson, and John Logan. Directed by John Henson. World Premiere.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Bryant J. Reynolds.
  • Sly Fox by Larry Gelbart. Directed by Ryland Merkey.
  • Holiday by Phillip Barry. Directed by John Logan.
  • Da by Hugh Leonard. Directed by Judith Kelly Davis.
  • Evocations. Performed by Princess Grace of Monaco and John Westbrook.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • The Darning Tree by Trey Hall. Directed by Hanna Cusick. World Premiere. Opening October 23, 1979
  • Angel's Crossing by Allen Hibbard. Directed by Michael Scudday. World Premiere. Opening December 11, 1979
  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Jim Marvin, adapted from Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Directed by C. P. Hendrie. Opening April 8, 1980
  • Village Wooing by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Campbell Thomas. Opening May 29, 1980

THE EUGENE MCKINNEY NEW PLAY READING SERIES

  • Death and the Maiden by John Gardner. Directed by Judith Davis.

1980–1981

  • Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand. Directed by Anton Rodgers.
  • On Golden Pond by Ernest Thompson. Directed by Joan Vail Thorne.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by John Figlmiller and Sally Netzel. Directed by Bryant J. Reynolds.
  • The Incredible Murder of Cardinal Tosca by Alden Nowlan and Walter Learning. Directed by Judith Davis.
  • Children of a Lesser God by Mark Medoff. Directed by Mark Medoff.
  • Deathtrap by Ira Levin. Directed by Christopher Pennywitt.
  • Goya by Henry Beissel. Directed by Peter Lynch.
  • Grandma Duck Is Dead by Larry Shue. Directed by Paul Munger.
  • A Kurt Weill Cabaret by Martha Schlamme and Alvin Epstein. Music by Kurt Weill.
  • Stagg and Stella by Fred Getchell.
  • The French Have a Word For It by Georges Feydeau, translated by Barnett Shaw. Directed by Derek Goldby.

1981–1982

  • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy. Directed by Joan Vail Thorne.
  • Tintypes by Mary Kyte with Mel Marvin and Gary Pearle. Directed by David Pursley, musical direction by Raymond Allen.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by John Figlmiller and Sally Netzel. Directed by Judith Davis.
  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Directed by Anton Rodgers.
  • Tartuffe by Molière. Directed by Paul Baker in association with Russell Henderson and Barnett Shaw.
  • Black Coffee by Agatha Christie. Directed by Walter Learning.
  • The Gin Game by D. L. Coburn. Directed by Karl Guttman.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • Under Distant Skies by Jeffery Kinghorn. Directed by Randy Bonifay.
  • The Wisteria Bush by Jo Vander Voort. Directed by Michael Scuddy.

THE EUGENE MCKINNEY NEW PLAY READING SERIES

  • High Cockalorum by Joan Vail Thorne. Directed by Mary Lou Hoyle.

1982–1983

  • The Three Musketeers by Peter Raby, based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas. Directed by David Pursley.
  • A Murder Is Announced by Agatha Christie, adapted by Leslie Darbon. Directed by Robyn Flatt.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by John Figlmiller and Sally Netzel. Directed by Candy Buckley.
  • A Lesson from Aloes by Athol Fugard. Directed by Judith Davis.
  • Cotton Patch Gospel by Tom Key and Russell Treyz, music and lyrics by Harry Chapin. Directed by Russell Treyz.
  • The Threepenny Opera. Book and lyrics by Bertolt Brecht, music by Kurt Weill, English adaptation by Marc Blitzstein. Directed by Ivan Rider, musical direction by Raymond Allen.
  • The Dresser by Ronald Harwood. Directed by Mary Sue Jones.
  • Amadeus by Peter Shaffer. Directed by Robert Williams.
  • Talley's Folly by Lanford Wilson. Directed by Robyn Flatt.

DOWN CENTER STAGE

  • Topeka Scuffle by Paul Munger. Directed by Dennis Vincent.

1983–1984

  • Billy Bishop Goes to War by John Gray with Eric Peterson. Directed by Richard Jenkins.
  • Galileo by Bertolt Brecht. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • The Wild Duck by Henrik Ibsen. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • Fool for Love by Sam Shepard. Directed by David Wheeler.
  • Seven Keys to Baldpate by George M. Cohan. Directed by Peter Gerety.
  • Lady Audley's Secret by Douglas Seale, based on the 1860 novel by Elizabeth Braddon. Directed by Word Baker.
  • Cloud 9 by Caryl Churchill. Directed by Word Baker.
  • Tom Jones by Larry Arrick, based on the novel by Henry Fielding. Directed by Larry Arrick.

1984–1985

  • Misalliance by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Phillip Minor.
  • Amadeus by Peter Shaffer. Directed by Patrick Hines.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • Passion Play by Peter Nichols. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • Good by C. P. Taylor. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Suzanne Shepherd.
  • You Can’t Take It with You by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. Directed by Peter Gerety.

1985–1986

  • The Ups and Downs of Theophilus Maitland by Vinette Carroll and Miki Grant. Directed by Vinette Carroll.
  • The Skin of Our Teeth by Thornton Wilder. Directed by Peter Gerety.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • The Marriage of Bette and Boo by Christopher Durang. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • Kith and Kin by Oliver Hailey. Directed by Adrian Hall. World Premiere.
  • The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Thomas Hill.
  • The Tavern by George M. Cohan. Directed by Tony Giordano.

1986–1987

  • Noises Off by Michael Frayn. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Martin Rayner.
  • The Real Thing by Tom Stoppard. Directed by Philip Minor.
  • An Enemy of the People by Henrik Ibsen. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • Step on a Crack by Susan Zeder.
  • The Miser by Molière. Directed by Stephen Porter.
  • A Lie of the Mind by Sam Shepard. Directed by Adrian Hall.

1987–1988

  • The Tempest by William Shakespeare. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • Through the Leaves by Franz Xavier Kroetz. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • Glengarry Glen Ross by David Mamet. Directed by Larry Arrick.
  • Uncle Vanya by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Fred Curchack.
  • The House of Blue Leaves by John Guare. Directed by Larry Arrick.
  • Diary of a Scoundrel by Alexander Ostrovsky, adapted by Erik Brogger. Directed by Ken Bryant.

1988–1989

  • Laughing Wild by Christopher Durang. Directed by Michael Greif.
  • Ah, Wilderness! by Eugene O’Neill. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • Les Liaisons Dangereuses by Christopher Hampton, based on the novel by Laclos. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Jack Willis.
  • Aunt Dan and Lemon by Wallace Shawn. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • The Boys Next Door by Tom Griffin. Directed by Neal Baron.
  • The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. Directed by Jonas Jurasas.
  • The Birthday Party by Harold Pinter. Directed by Tony Giordano.
  • Red Noses by Peter Barnes. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • In the Belly of the Beast by Jack Henry Abbott. Directed by Ken Bryant.

1989–1990

  • Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • Once in a Lifetime by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. Directed by Larry Sloan.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • Prologue to All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren. Directed by Adrian Hall.
  • Temptation by Václav Havel. Directed by Ljubisa Georgievski.
  • Buried Child by Sam Shepard. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • Zero Positive by Harry Kondoleon. Directed by Chris Coleman.
  • The Secret Rapture by David Hare. Directed by Ken Bryant.
  • A Flea in Her Ear by Georges Feydeau. Directed by Itamar Kubovy.

1990–1991

  • The Inspector-General by Nickolai Gogol. Directed by Ken Bryant and Matthew Posey.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Allen McCalla.
  • All My Sons by Arthur Miller. Directed by Lou "Luigi" Salerni.
  • As You Like It by William Shakespeare. Directed by David McClendon.
  • My Children! My Africa! by Athol Fugard. Directed by Clinton T. Davis.
  • Abundance by Beth Henley. Directed by John H. Davis.
  • Other People's Money by Jerry Sterner. Directed by Charles Towers.

1991–1992

  • A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare. Directed by David Petrarca.
  • The Substance of Fire by Jon Robin Baitz. Directed by Richard Hamburger. Regional Premiere.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Adrian Hall and Richard Cumming. Directed by Randy Moore.
  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Malcolm Morrison.
  • I Hate Hamlet by Paul Rudnick. Directed by Lou "Luigi" Salerni.
  • Miss Evers’ Boys by David Feldshuh. Directed by Claude Purdy.
  • Taking Steps by Alan Ayckbourn. Directed by Lou "Luigi" Salerni.

1992–1993

  • A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Laird Williamson and Dennis Powers. Directed by Lonny Price.
  • Another Time by Ronald Harwood. Directed by Vivian Matalon.
  • The Misanthrope by Molière, adapted by Neil Bartlett. Directed by Jackson Phippen.
  • Spunk by Zora Neale Hurston, adapted by George C. Wolfe. Directed by Reggie Montgomery.
  • Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill by Laine Robertson. Directed by Victoria Bussert.
  • A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

THE BIG D FESTIVAL OF THE UNEXPECTED

  • Alki by Eric Overmyer. Directed by Melissa Cooper.
  • The America Play by Suzan-Lori Parks. Directed by Liz Diamond.
  • Dostoevsky Goes to the Beach by Marco Antonio de la Parra, translated and directed by Melia Bensussen.
  • Porcelain by Chay Yew. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Otrabanda Company's Simpatico written and directed by Roger Babb.

1993–1994

  • Six Degrees of Separation by John Guare. Directed by Stephen Wadsworth.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Thomas Cabaniss and Evan Yionoulis. Directed by Evan Yionoulis.
  • Dark Rapture by Eric Overmyer. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Das Barbecü. Book and lyrics by Jim Luigs, music by Scott Warrender. Directed by Lisa Peterson.
  • Real Women Have Curves by Josefina Lopez. Directed by Evan Yionoulis.
  • The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Loot by Joe Orton. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.

THE BIG D FESTIVAL OF THE UNEXPECTED

  • Mump & Smoot in Something. Directed by Karen Hines.
  • The Beledi Ensemble in Concert.
  • Enter the Night. Written and directed by Maria Irene Fornes.
  • Lost in Utopia by Katherine Griffith. Directed by Michael Andrew Walton.
  • Dark Pocket by Jim Neu. Directed by Rocky Bornstein.
  • Random Acts of Kindness by Brenda Wong Aoki. Directed by Jael Weisman.
  • The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner, adapted by Erik Ehn. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

1994–1995

  • Room Service by Allen Boretz and John Murray. Directed by Richard Hamburger. 10/25-11/13
  • Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens. Directed by Victoria Bussert.
  • Avenue X. Book and lyrics by John Jiler, music and lyrics by Ray Leslee.
  • A Family Affair by Alexander Ostrovsky, adapted by Nick Dear. Directed by Stan Wojewodski Jr.
  • Santos & Santos by Octavio Solis. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

THE BIG D FESTIVAL OF THE UNEXPECTED

  • Dirty Work by Larry Brown and Richard Corley. Directed by Richard Corley.
  • Skin by Naomi Iizuka. Directed by Matthew Wilde.
  • Pochsy's Lips. Written and performed by Karen Hines. Directed by Sandra Balcovske.
  • C. J. Critt: Smoking Lips. Written and performed by C. J. Critt.
  • It's Liz: Jazz, Blues and Gospel. Directed by Akin Babatunde.
  • Words and Music: New Seed. Devised and performed by Ramona Austin.
  • Mump and Smoot in Ferno and Caged. Directed by Karen Hines.

1995–1996

  • The Invisible Circus, created and performed by Victoria Chaplin and Jean Baptiste Thierrée.
  • Ohio Tip-Off by James Yoshimura. Directed by Kenny Leon.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Gerald Freedman. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • The Sternheim Project: The Unmentionables and The Snob by Carl Sternheim, translated by Paul Lampert and Kate Sullivan, adapted by Melissa Cooper, Paul Lampert, and Kate Sullivan. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Arms and the Man by George Bernard Shaw. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • Angels in America, Part One: Millennium Approaches by Tony Kushner. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

THE BIG D FESTIVAL OF THE UNEXPECTED

  • Little Mahagonny. Music by Kurt Weill, text by Bertolt Brecht. Directed by Jean Randich.
  • Entrevista 187 by Gil Kofman. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • The Bible Belt and Other Accessories, written and performed by Paul Bonin-Rodriguez. Directed by Steve Bailey.
  • Nostalgia Maldita: 1-900-MEXICO, written and performed by Yareli Arizmendi, Directed by Luis Torner.
  • I Used to Be One Hot Number, written and performed by Rhonda Blair.
  • Like I Say by Len Jenkin. Directed by Len Jenkin.
  • The Flaming Idiots.

1996–1997

  • Three Tall Women by Edward Albee. Directed by Lawrence Sacharow.
  • Angels in America, Part Two: Perestroika by Tony Kushner. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • ‘‘A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens, adapted by Gerald Freedman. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • Indiscretions (Les Parents Terribles) by Jean Cocteau. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • Thunder Knocking on the Door by Keith Glover. Directed by Marion McClinton.
  • All's Well That Ends Well by William Shakespeare. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

THE BIG D FESTIVAL OF THE UNEXPECTED

  • Culture Clash
  • Sueños Sueños Son by Octavio Solis. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Broken Morning by Chiori Miyagawa. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • The Waters of March: An Eclectic Evening of Song.
  • The Beledi Ensemble
  • Texas Tenors: Two Generations of Jazz Saxophone.
  • Grassroots Willie
  • A Capitol Idea: A Tribute to the Artists of Capitol Records.
  • A Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf. Edited by Constance McCord. Directed by Constance McCord.
  • Ranting, Raving & Just Plain Talking: An Informal Evening of Voices & Drums.

1997–1998

  • Intimate Exchanges by Alan Ayckbourn. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • The Collected Works of Billy the Kid by Michael Ondaatje. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Gerald Freedman. Directed by Raphael Parry.
  • An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • Long Day's Journey into Night by Eugene O’Neill. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years by Emily Mann, adapted from the book by Sarah L. Delany and A. Elizabeth Delany with Amy Hill Hearth. Directed by Shirley Basfield Dunlap.

1998–1999

  • Tartuffe by Molière, translated by Christopher Hampton. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • How I Learned to Drive by Paula Vogel. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Gerald Freedman. Directed by Preston Lane.
  • A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry. Directed by L. Kenneth Richardson.
  • Alice: Tales of a Curious Girl by Karen Hartman, adapted from the books of Lewis Carroll. Directed by Jonathan Moscone. World Premiere.
  • South Pacific. Music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, book by Oscar Hammerstein II and Joshua Logan. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

1999–2000

  • Dinah Was: The Dinah Washington Musical by Oliver Goldstick. Directed by David Petrarca.
  • The Seagull by Anton Chekhov. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Preston Lane and Jonathan Moscone. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • The Mystery of Irma Vep by Charles Ludlam. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • Inexpressible Island by David Young. Directed by Preston Lane.
  • Guys and Dolls. Music and lyrics by Frank Loesser, book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

THE BIG D FESTIVAL OF THE UNEXPECTED

  • Dreamlandia by Octavio Solis. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Quake by Melanie Marnich. Directed by Katherine Owens.
  • Krapp's Last Tape by Samuel Beckett. Directed by Matthew Wilder.
  • The Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler. Directed by Pam Myers Morgan.
  • The Chinese Art of Placement by Stanley Rutherford. Directed by Tina Parker.
  • Rockaby by Samuel Beckett. Directed by Rene Moreno.
  • Suicide at 8. Written and performed by C. J. Critt. Directed by Lisa Lawrence Holland.
  • BL Lacerta Presents Live Film Scores
  • Buddy Mohmed & American Bedouin
  • Paul Slavens & The Texclectic Unsemble
  • Plato's Kave
  • Nick Brisco
  • little d: The Write Stuff
  • little d: BL Lacerta Kid Film Scores
  • little d: Legends Alive!

2000–2001

  • Crumbs from the Table of Joy by Lynn Nottage. Directed by Reggie Montgomery.
  • An Experiment with an Air Pump by Shelagh Stephenson. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Preston Lane and Jonathan Moscone. Directed by John Moscone.
  • The Night of the Iguana by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Preston Lane.
  • Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Wit by Margaret Edson. Directed by K. Elizabeth Stevens.

2001–2002

  • Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen, translated by Christopher Hampton. Directed by Ron Daniels.
  • The Front Page by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Preston Lane and Jonathan Moscone. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • Blur by Melanie Marnich. Directed by Claudia Zelevansky.
  • Blues in the Night, a musical conceived by Sheldon Epps. Directed by Kenny Leon.
  • Our Town by Thornton Wilder. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

2002–2003

  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Be Aggressive by Annie Weisman. Directed by Claudia Zelevansky.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Preston Lane and Jonathan Moscone. Directed by Jenny Lord.
  • The Real Thing by Tom Stoppard. Directed by Stan Wojewodski Jr.
  • Big Love by Charles L. Mee. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Fully Committed by Becky Mode. Directed by Daniel Goldstein.
  • Cotton Patch Gospel. Book by Tom Key and Russell Treyz, music and lyrics by Harry Chapin. Based on the book The Cotton Patch Version of Matthew and John by Clarence Jordan. Directed by Joel Ferrell.

2003–2004

  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Claudia Zelevansky.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Preston Lane and Jonathan Moscone. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • Accidental Death of an Anarchist by Dario Fo. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Topdog/Underdog by Suzan-Lori Parks. Directed by Amy Morton, associate directed by Ann C. James.
  • Ain’t Misbehavin’. Conceived and originally directed by Richard Maltby Jr. Directed by Greg Ganakas.

FRESH INK: NEW PLAYS AT THE DALLAS THEATER CENTER

  • Dark Matters by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa. Directed by Greg Leaming.
  • Water Stories from the Mojave Desert by Brighde Mullins. Directed by Claudia Zelevansky.
  • Sonny's Last Shot by Lawrence Wright. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • Late: A Cowboy Song by Sarah Ruhl. Directed by Rene Moreno.
  • Shot While Dancing by Hilary Bell. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

TOURING PRODUCTION

  • The Antigone Project by Melissa Cooper, based on Sophocles’ Antigone. Directed by Pam Myers-Morgan.

2004–2005

  • Anna in the Tropics by Nilo Cruz. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Stan Wojewodski Jr.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted by Preston Lane and Jonathan Moscone. Directed by Jonathan Moscone.
  • Bad Dates by Theresa Rebeck, starring Julie White. Directed by John Benjamin Hickey.
  • The Violet Hour by Richard Greenberg. Directed by David Kennedy.
  • My Fair Lady by Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

FRESH INK: NEW PLAYS AT THE DALLAS THEATER CENTER

  • Pro Bono Publico by Peter Morris. Directed by David Kennedy.
  • Cradle of Man by Melanie Marnich. Directed by Melissa Cooper.
  • . . . and Jesus Moonwalks the Mississippi by Marcus Gardley. Directed by David Kennedy.

TOURING PRODUCTION

  • The Antigone Project by Melissa Cooper, based on Sophocles’ Antigone. Directed by Pam Myers-Morgan.

2005–2006

  • Crowns by Regina Taylor, adapted from the book by Michael Cunningham and Craig Marberry. Directed by Regina Taylor.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adapted for the stage by Richard Hellesen with original music by David de Berry. Directed by Joel Ferrell.
  • Joe Egg by Peter Nichols. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • I Am My Own Wife by Doug Wright. Directed by David Kennedy.
  • Hank Williams: Lost Highway by Randal Myler and Mark Harelik. Directed by Randal Myler.
  • The Illusion by Pierre Corneille, freely adapted by Tony Kushner. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

FRESH INK: NEW PLAYS AT THE DALLAS THEATER CENTER

  • Girl Blog from Iraq: Baghdad Burning, adapted from the weblog by Riverbend by Kimberly I. Kefgen and Loren Ingrid Noveck. Directed by David Kennedy.
  • Psychos Never Dream by Denis Johnson. Directed by David Kennedy.

FRESH INK/FORWARD MOTION

  • Macbeth by William Shakespeare, directed by Melissa Cooper.
  • Thom Pain (based on nothing) by Will Eno. Directed by David Kennedy.

2006-2007

  • 2 Pianos 4 Hands written by Ted Dykstra and Richard Greenblatt
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof by Tennessee Williams. Directed by Richard Hamburger.
  • A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, adopted for the stage by Richard Hellesen with original music by David de Berry. Directed by Joel Ferrell.
  • Moonlight and Magnolias by Ron Hutchinson. Directed by David Kennedy.
  • Fences by August Wilson. Directed by Jonathan Wilson.
  • The Taming of the Shrew by William Shakespeare. Directed by Richard Hamburger.

FRESH INK/FORWARD MOTION

  • Des Moines by Denis Johnson. Directed by David Kennedy.

2007–2008

2008–2009

2009–2010

External links[edit]