Damned yellow composite

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A poster of twelve different species of flowers of the Asteraceae family: 1. Yellow chamomile 2. Garland chrysanthemum 3. Coleostephus myconis 4. Marguerite 5. Sow thistle 6. Chicory 7. Treasure flower 8. Galactites tomentosa 9. Field marigold 10. Ox-eye daisy 11. Common hawkweed 12. Cape daisy

A damned or damn yellow composite (DYC) is a jocular reference to the difficulty of distinguishing many of the numerous species of composite flowers (family Asteraceae) that have yellow flowers and can be difficult to tell apart in the field.[1][2] It is sometimes reserved for those yellow composites of no particular interest.[1] Notable individuals who referred to these difficult yellow composites as "DYCs" include Oliver Sacks[3] and Lady Bird Johnson.[4] The term is also applied (by changing "yellow" to "white") to white flowers.[according to whom?]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rick Darke (2002). The American Woodland Garden: Capturing the Spirit of the Deciduous Forest. Timber Press. p. 377. ISBN 0-88192-545-4.  page 230
  2. ^ Graham Nicholls, Rick Lupp, Bobby J. Ward (2002). Alpine plants of North America: an encyclopedia of mountain flowers from the Rockies to Alaska. Timber Press. p. 344. ISBN 0-88192-548-9.  page 145
  3. ^ Oliver W. Sacks (2002). Oaxaca journal. National Geographic. p. 159. ISBN 0-7922-6521-1.  page 48
  4. ^ Roger Welsch (2006). Weed 'em and Reap: A Weed Eater Reader. Globe Pequot. p. 256. ISBN 0-7627-3907-X.  page 172

External links[edit]