Dan Cohen (academic)

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Cohen in 2014.

Daniel J. Cohen is an American historian. He is the Founding Executive Director of the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA). He was the director of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media for 12 years, until leaving his position for the DPLA in 2013. His research work has focused around digital history and abstract mathematics being used in Victorian society to explain spirituality.[1][2] In 2012 he was named one of the Chronicle for Higher Educations Tech Innovators.[3]

He was raised in the Boston area. As a teenager he was named one of the 20 best high school students in New England. He participated in the International Math Olympiad in 1985. Cohen earned his degree's at Yale University, Harvard University, and Princeton University. He studied math while he was at Princeton. He started working for Roy Rosenzweig in 2001.[3] He is a contributing writer to The Atlantic and Wired.[4][5]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Cohen, Daniel J. and Roy Rosenzweig. "Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web". Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press (2005). ISBN 0812219236
  • Cohen, Daniel J. Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (2007). ISBN 0801885531

References[edit]

  1. ^ Enis, Matt. "Q&A: Dan Cohen on His Role as the Founding Executive Director of DPLA". The Digital Shift. Library Journal. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 
  2. ^ Howard, Jennifer. "With New Leader, Digital Public Library of America Prepares for Its Debut". Wired Campus. The Chronicle for Higher Education. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 
  3. ^ a b Parry, Marc. "A Digital Humanist Puts New Tools in the Hands of Scholars". Technology. The Chronicle for Higher Education. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 
  4. ^ Cohen, Dan. "The Fight Over the Future of Digital Books". Technology. The Atlantic. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 
  5. ^ Cohen, Dan. "To Make Open Access Work, We Need to Do More Than Liberate Journal Articles". Opinion. Wired. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 

External links[edit]