Dan Hedaya

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Dan Hedaya
Born Daniel G. Hedaya
(1940-07-24) July 24, 1940 (age 73)
Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1962–present

Daniel G. “Dan” Hedaya (born July 24, 1940) is an American character actor. He often plays sleazy villains or uptight, wisecracking individuals; three of his best-known roles are as Italian Mafia boss Tony Costello in Wise Guys, a cuckolded husband in the Coen brothers' crime thriller Blood Simple, and the scheming Nick Tortelli on the sitcom Cheers.

Life and career[edit]

Hedaya was born in Brooklyn, New York, to a Sephardic Jewish family from Syria.[1][2][3] His father emigrated from Aleppo.[4] Hedaya was raised in Bensonhurst, and worked as a junior high school teacher for many years before deciding to pursue acting full-time.[4]

Alongside a successful career in the movies, Hedaya has held several TV roles, including Carla Tortelli's ex-husband Nick on the sitcom Cheers and its short-lived spinoff The Tortellis. He played the estranged father of Mallory Keaton's boyfriend, Nick, on the sitcom Family Ties. More recently, he played an Italian-American priest in the controversial and quickly cancelled NBC series The Book of Daniel. Adding to his list of television credits is his performance as the long-lost father of Adrian Monk on Monk. He also guest starred in 1997 and 2005 as a wisecracking lawyer on the medical drama ER.

In films, Hedaya has played the evil dictator Arius in 1985's Commando, Mel Horowitz, the father of Alicia Silverstone's Cher in the 1995 film Clueless. He played Julian Marty in the first Coen brothers' feature, Blood Simple. His physical similarity to Richard Nixon led to his being cast as the former president for the film Dick. During the 1980s Hedaya also appeared in the television series Miami Vice.[5]

In 2006, Hedaya received the P.T. Barnum Award from Tufts University for his exceptional work in the field of media and entertainment.[citation needed]

Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Philadelphia Rings a Bell FOR 'First Wives Club' Actor". Jewish Exponent. 1996-10-03. Retrieved 2007-12-10. 
  2. ^ Weinraub, Bernard (1995-11-14). "After 20 Years, Dan Hedaya Is Fading Out of Anonymity". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-12-10. 
  3. ^ Zenner, Walter P. (2000). A Global Community: The Jews from Aleppo, Syria. Wayne State University Press. ISBN 0-8143-2791-5. 
  4. ^ a b Schleier, Curt (1999-10-28). "A Night at the Sephardic Film Festival". The Jewish Journal. Retrieved 2009-06-15. 
  5. ^ http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0647128/fullcredits?ref_=tt_ov_st_sm

External links[edit]