Dan Jones (composer)

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Dan Jones is a BAFTA and Ivor Novello Award winning composer and sound designer working in film and theatre. He read music at the University of Oxford, studied contemporary music theatre at the Banff Centre for the Arts and studied electro-acoustic composition and programming at the Centro Ricerche Musicali in Rome. Having explored various means of generating music algorithmically, he is the author of one of the earliest pieces of software for generating fractal or self-similar music.

Career[edit]

His scores for feature films include Shadow of the Vampire (starring John Malkovich and Willem Dafoe), In Transit (also starring John Malkovich), Jericho Mansions (starring James Caan) and Menno Meyjes' Max (starring John Cusack), for which he received the Ivor Novello Award for Best Film Score 2004. He also scored Meyjes' follow up film "Manolete" (starring Adrien Brody and Penélope Cruz).

He has written for all the major British television broadcasters and his work includes Sir David Attenborough's The Life of Mammals, the BBC series Strange, Pawel Pawlikowski's drama "Twockers", Charlie Brooker's Channel 4 horror series "Dead Set" and Francesca Joseph's "Tomorrow La Scala", Channel 4's three part documentary " Visions of Heaven and Hell" shown in 1994. He collaborated with Sebastião Salgado, John Berger and Paul Carlin on the BBC Arena (television) special "The Spectre of Hope". He recently composed the music for the BAFTA Best Drama Serial Any Human Heart for Channel 4 which also won both BAFTA and Ivor Novello Best Television Score Awards. More recently, he composed the music for ITV's controversial Fred West drama, 'Appropriate Adult'.

In 1997 he teamed up with British trip hop group Alpha producing orchestral arrangements for their albums ComeFromHeaven, The Impossible Thrill and Jarvis Cocker's cover of "This is Where I Came In" for Massive Attack's Melankolic label.

He has also created music and soundscapes for large scale public artworks. He is the co-creator of Sky Orchestra where music is played from seven hot air balloons positioned over a city, making it one of the largest sound works in the world. After an initial informal performance in Bristol in 2003, Sky Orchestra was first successfully staged in Birmingham commissioned by Fierce! and was later re-commissioned by Fierce and the Royal Shakespeare Company as part of the Complete Works Festival. Sky Orchestra opened the Sydney Festival in 2007 and has also toured to Canada and Switzerland.[1] He also produced the sound design for "Listening Posts, an art work by Daphne Wright to commemorate the Irish emigrants who left Cork's harbourside which produces an ever changing sound score throughout the year.[2] His most recent work is Suburban Counterpoint subtitled "Music for Seven Ice Cream Vans" which was co-commissioned by London International Festival of Theatre (LIFT), Norfolk and Norwich Festival and The Sydney Festival. In an idea dating back to 2000 the work, as the title suggests, uses seven ice cream vans to produce a surround sound score which inhabits an entire neighbourhood at once.[3][4]

Other works include the score for the Rambert Dance Company's "Slippage" by choreographer William Tuckett. His music has been used by The European Space Agency and incorporated into Isaac Julien's Paradise Omeros which is exhibited at Tate Modern, London.

He is founding member and co-artistic director of Sound and Fury Theatre Company whose productions pioneer the immersive use of experimental sound design. He recently co-directed and sound designed the theatre production "Kursk" which toured the UK after a sellout run at the Young Vic theatre in London.[5][6][7]

He was the first ever recipient of a special jury prize for sound design at the Prague Quadrennial for his work on Sound and Fury's production of Kursk alongside fellow sound designer Kathrine Sandys for her piece Hush.

His musical work is published by Faber Music

Awards and nominations[edit]

Discography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sky Orchestra". The Sydney Morning Herald. 18 December 2006. 
  2. ^ "Archived News 2007 > News >". CorkCity.ie. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 
  3. ^ Eddie Mair (21 May 2010). "PM: Music for Ice Cream Vans". BBC. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 
  4. ^ "LIFT - Plunge". Liftfestival.com. Retrieved 26 February 2012. 
  5. ^ Mountford, Fiona (30 March 2010). "Kursk is unmissable". Evening Standard. Retrieved 25 April 2010. 
  6. ^ Marlowe, Sam (31 March 2010). "Kursk at the Young Vic, SE1". The Times (London). Retrieved 25 April 2010. 
  7. ^ Gardner, Lyn (31 March 2010). "Kursk". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 25 April 2010. 

External links[edit]