Dan Schulman

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Not to be confused with Dan Shulman the ESPN broadcaster

Born (1958-01-19) January 19, 1958 (age 56)
Newark, New Jersey
Nationality American
Alma mater Middlebury College, NYU Business School
Occupation Business Executive

Dan Schulman is an American business executive who serves as Group President of Enterprise Growth at American Express. The former President of Sprint's Prepaid Group and the founding CEO of Virgin Mobile, Schulman is responsible for American Express' global strategy to expand alternative mobile and online payment services, form new partnerships, and build revenue streams beyond the traditional card and travel businesses.[1]

Early life[edit]

Schulman was born and raised in Newark, New Jersey, and was captain of the football, tennis, and lacrosse teams at Princeton High School.[2] He earned his Bachelor of Arts in Economics from Middlebury College and a Masters in Business Administration from New York University.

His mother, S. Ruth Schulman, was associate dean of Rutgers' Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology (GSAPP) from 1974 to 1999. His father, the late Mel Schulman, was a chemical engineer.[3]

Schulman once told the New York Times, "I was born with social activism in my DNA. My grandfather was a union organizer in the garment district in New York City. My mother took me to a civil rights demonstration in Washington in my stroller."[4]

Business background[edit]

Schulman began his business career at AT&T, serving more than 18 years there and becoming the youngest member of the company’s most senior executive team, the AT&T Operations Group.[5] When Schulman left AT&T, he was president of the $22 billion core consumer long distance business.

From AT&T he became president and COO, and then CEO of Priceline.com. During his two years there, Priceline's annual revenues grew from a reported $20 million to about $1 billion.[6]

In 2001, Schulman became the CEO of Virgin Mobile USA, Inc. Schulman led the company from its national launch in 2002[7] to its becoming a public company in 2007 to its sale to Sprint Nextel in 2009. By the time Schulman left Virgin Mobile, it had become one of the nation’s top wireless carriers, with more than 5 million customers and $1.3 billion in annual sales. Following the sale of Virgin Mobile to Sprint Nextel, Schulman served as President of Sprint’s Prepaid group until he moved to American Express.

Board service[edit]

Schulman became chairman of the Board of Directors of Symantec (SYMC-NASDAQ),[8] in January 2013;[9] and is a member of the Board of Directors of Flextronics (FLEX-NASDAQ).[10] Schulman also serves on the advisory committee of Greycroft Partners, a private equity company focused on early stage new media and technology companies.[11]

In addition, Schulman serves on the Board of Governors of Rutgers,[12] the state university of New Jersey. He also serves on the board of Teach for America.[13]

Awards[edit]

Schulman was named by Business Week as one of the top 20 people to watch in media,[14] and was named the Ernst & Young 2009 Entrepreneur Of The Year.[15] In 2009 he was also named one of the top 25 most powerful people in the global wireless industry.[16]

Personal[edit]

When he was CEO of Virgin Mobile, Schulman led a partnership with StandUp For Kids, a nonprofit that distributes survival kits and a hotline number to homeless youth. To get a truer sense of what homeless kids experience, Schulman once spent 24 hours on the streets of New York City, unshaven, wrapped in a blanket, and without money, a watch, or a cell phone. "There’s a certain amount of deference paid to a C.E.O.," he later said. "No one paid attention to me on the street. I consider myself a good communicator and a good salesman. It took me five hours of begging to raise less than a dollar. My entire concept of what is important changed. Time is usually my most valuable commodity, but for that 24 hours I had too much time. Forget Starbucks and a $4 latte — I walked two miles to find a 25-cent cup of coffee."[17]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]