Dana Ullman

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Dana Ullman
Born Gregory Dana Ullman
(1951-12-22)December 22, 1951
Hollywood, California, USA
Nationality United States of America
Ethnicity Caucasian
Citizenship United States of America
Education MPH, University of California, Berkeley
Alma mater University of California at Berkeley
Occupation Instructor
Known for Promotion of homeopathy and integrative medicine, alternative medicine
Website
http://www.homeopathic.com

Gregory Dana Ullman (born December 22, 1951) is an American author, publisher, journalist, and proponent in the field of homeopathy.

Ullman received his MPH from the University of California at Berkeley, and has since taught homeopathy and integrative health care.[1] Ullman served as an instructor in homeopathy at the University of California at San Francisco, and as member of the Advisory Council of the Alternative Medicine Center at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons.[2] In previous years he has been the chairperson for the National Center for Homeopathy's Annual Conference,[3] and has been consulted by Harvard Medical School's Center to Assess Alternative Therapy for Chronic Illness.[4] He is also a regular speaker at universities, medical schools, pharmacy schools, and hospitals.[4]

Journalist John Stossel of ABC News described Ullman as "homeopathy's foremost spokesman."[5] Anastasia Toufexis of Time Magazine described him as a "leading proselytizer of homeopathy".[6]

Views and controversies[edit]

Ullman was interviewed on the American Broadcasting Company program 20/20 in a segment about homeopathy (January 30, 2004).[5] He claimed that homeopathic preparations of extremely high dilution, i.e. those likely to contain zero molecules of the original substance, are effective because, he said, "the water gets impregnated with the information or memory of the original substance."[5] When asked to suggest a laboratory experiment that 20/20 could independently conduct as a way to test the legitimacy of homeopathy, Ullman recommended the Ennis experiment, a study that seemed to show that ultra-dilute solutions of histamine, diluted to the levels used in homeopathic remedies, could affect cells just as the controls did.[7][8][9] The result of 20/20's experiment was negative; the homeopathic dilution failed to produce a measurable effect when compared to plain water.[5] Ullman has claimed the test was flawed as it was not a direct replication of Ennis' work.[10][11] However, this experiment and one run by the BBC were ruled to be valid by independent experts commissioned by the BBC.[12]

In an editorial in The Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology,[13] editor-in-chief Gerald Weissmann criticized the scientific basis of homeopathy and included Dana Ullman in his criticism. Weissmann criticized Ullman for recommending, during the 2001 anthrax attacks in the USA, the use of the homeopathic preparation called Anthracinum to prevent infection.[14] Ullman said he recommended Anthracinium for people who are at high risk of infection and who decline ciprofloxacin because of concerns over its side effects. While Ullman expressed concern about vendors "taking advantage of people wrapped up in the fear of the situation", he said "It would be irresponsible for us not to provide something that might be helpful."[14] There is no evidence for the efficacy of Anthracinum, which is derived from nosodes gathered from infected pigs, and then diluted to "a point where no molecules of the disease product remain."[13][14] In a right-of-reply letter, Ullman depicted Weissmann's editorial as an "unscientific critique" of homeopathy and cited five peer-reviewed studies.[15] Weissmann responded: "Mr. Ullman is clearly a devotee of his art, and I respect his opinions. I’m afraid that I view Mr. Ullman’s references to the efficacy of homeopathy as modern versions of those Dr Holmes distrusted," and went on to quote from a well-known critique of homeopathy by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.: "...such cases deserve very little confidence. Yet they may sound well enough, one at a time, to those who are not fully aware of the fallacies of medical evidence."[16][17]

Bibliography[edit]

Other writings[edit]

Ullman's letters and writings have appeared in The Western Journal of Medicine, Social Policy, Utne Reader, The Futurist, The Arthritis Foundation's Guide to Alternative Medicine, Atlanta: Arthritis Foundation, (J. Horstman) 1999 and The Reader's Digest Family Guide to Natural Medicine.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ California Alumni Association (February 1999). "Q&A with Dana Ullman". Alumni Magazine. University of California Berkeley's California Alumni Association. Retrieved 2008-01-22. 
  2. ^ "Dana Ullman, - Healthworld Online - HealthWorld Online, HealthWorld Online - Natural health and Alternative medicine information, products and services.". Retrieved 2008-01-25. 
  3. ^ a b "Homeopathic Educational Services - Dana Ullman, M.P.H.". Retrieved 2008-01-26. 
  4. ^ a b Penguin Group USA. "About Dana Ullman". Retrieved 2008-01-24. 
  5. ^ a b c d Stossel, John (2008). "Homeopathic Remedies - Can Water Really Remember?". 20/20 (ABC News). Retrieved 2008-01-22. 
  6. ^ Toufexis, Anastasia (1995-09-25). "Is Homeopathy Good Medicine?". Time Magazine. Retrieved 2008-01-22. 
  7. ^ "13 Things That Do Not Make Sense". New Scientist (2491): 30. 2005-03-19. Retrieved 2007-03-04. "4. Belfast Homeopathy Results" 
  8. ^ ""We are unable to explain our findings and are reporting them to encourage others to investigate this phenomenon." Brown, VG; Ennis, M. (2001). "Flow-cytometric analysis of basophil activation: inhibition by histamine at convential and homeopathic concentrations". Inflammation Research (50): 47–48. 
  9. ^ Belon, M.; Cumps J, Ennis M, Mannaioni PF, Sainte-Laudy J, Roberfroid M, Wiegant FAC. (1999). "Inhibition of human basophil degranulation by successive histamine dilutions: results of a European multi-centre trial". Inflammation Research 48 (48): s17–s18. doi:10.1007/s000110050376. PMID 10350142. 
  10. ^ Homeopathic Educational Services - John Stossel and 20/20's Program on Homeopathy: Junk Science Creates Junk Journalism When TV Science Creates Science Fiction
  11. ^ Homeopathic Educational Services - Articles - Media reports
  12. ^ Williams, Nathan (2003-11-26). "Homeopathy: The test". Retrieved 2008-01-27. "Homeopathy is back where it started without any credible scientific explanation. That won't stop millions of people putting their faith in it, but science is confident. Homeopathy is impossible." 
  13. ^ a b Weissmann, Gerald (2006). "Homeopathy: Holmes, Hogwarts, and the Prince of Wales". The FASEB Journal. Retrieved 2008-05-21. 
  14. ^ a b c Garsombke, Kate (2001-10-29). "Alternative Remedies for Anthrax". AlterNet. Retrieved 2013-04-08. 
  15. ^ Ullman, Dana (2006). "Let’s have a serious discussion of nanopharmacology and homeopathy". The FASEB Journal. 
  16. ^ Weissmann, Gerald (2006). "Response to: Let’s have a serious discussion of nanopharmacology and homeopathy". The FASEB Journal. 
  17. ^ Holmes, O. H. (1892) "Homeopathy and Its Kindred Delusions." at Wikisource. retrieved 2013-11-27.

External links[edit]