Dance Dance Revolution Extreme (2004 video game)

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For the Japanese arcade and PlayStation 2 release, see Dance Dance Revolution Extreme.
Dance Dance Revolution Extreme
Dance Dance Revolution Extreme North American PlayStation 2 cover art.png
North American boxart
Developer(s) Konami
Publisher(s) Konami
Series Dance Dance Revolution
Bemani
Engine DDR Festival
Platform(s) PlayStation 2
Release date(s)
  • NA September 21, 2004[1]
Genre(s) Music, Exercise
Mode(s) Single-player, Multiplayer
Distribution DVD (1)

Dance Dance Revolution Extreme is a music video game and part of the Dance Dance Revolution series by Konami. It was released by Konami on September 21, 2004 and is the ninth DDR release in North America.[1]

Extreme was also the winner of the Video Music Awards in 2005 on MTV for * Best Video Game Soundtrack.[2]

Gameplay[edit]

Party Mode[edit]

Dance Dance Revolution Extreme introduced Party Mode which contains a number of mini games, some of which require the EyeToy accessory to play.

Hyper Dash[edit]

Hyper Dash does not require the EyeToy. The game uses the dance pad like the Power Pad and has players race each other down a city street avoiding obstacles and using power ups.

Feeding Time[edit]

Feeding Time does not require the EyeToy. A type of food is assigned to each arrow and players must step on the one that best matches the animal being displayed on screen.

Watch Me Dance[edit]

Watch Me Dance uses the EyeToy to place a live video of the player as the background during normal game play.

Clean the Screen[edit]

Clean the Screen requires players to move their arms across the EyeToy's view to wipe away visual obstructions during normal game play.

Hands and Feet[edit]

Hands and Feet add two hand targets to the arrow receptors at the top of the screen during normal game play. A special difficulty appears during song select that lets players play with their hands and feet at the same time.

Magical Ball[edit]

Magical Ball does not require the dance pad. Players use their hands to knock a ball into a set of block in an effort to clear them all without losing the ball, similar to Arkanoid.

Coconut Panic[edit]

Coconut Panic does not require the dance pad. Players shake palm trees with their movement and attempt to catch all the falling coconuts.

Song wheel[edit]

In Dance Dance Revolution Extreme the song wheel introduced in Dance Dance Revolution 5thMix was altered and put in the center of the screen, song scrolling left and right instead of up and down. The banners are displayed at the top of screen with the Foot Ratings listed below in the center of the wheel. The Groove Radar has been removed and Nonstop and Challenge modes are selectable on the wheel instead of during difficulty select.

Nonstop Mode[edit]

Challenging Mode[edit]

Workout Mode[edit]

Development[edit]

Music[edit]

Songs[edit]

  • "Believe" is a song by Eddie.J. It is a cover of "Believe" by Cher.
  • "Bizarre Love Triangle" is a song by Jerry. It is a cover of "Bizarre Love Triangle" by New Order.
  • "Highs Off U" is a song by 4 REEEL produced by Mark Summers for SCORCCiO. It features a sample replay of "Can't Get My Eyes Off You".
  • "Funk Boogie" is a song by the Funk Kid feat. Kool Boys.
  • "Ladies' Night" is a song by ∠R. It is a cover of "Ladies' Night" by Kool & the Gang.
  • "Like a Virgin" is a song by Tama_Happytone. It is a cover of "Like a Virgin" by Madonna.
  • "Maximizer" is a song by Cli-Max S.
  • "Waiting For Tonight" is a song by P.A.T. It is a cover of "Waiting for Tonight" by Jennifer Lopez.
  • 321 Stars
  • Drop the Bomb

Burger King promotion[edit]

In the fall of 2006 Burger King held a Dance Dance Revolution-themed promotion. Part of the promotion was a minigame on the Burger King website that if beaten provided an unlock code for the then two year old Dance Dance Revolution Extreme. Entering this code into the game unlocks the song "Memories". Prior to the release of this code DDR fan groups who had read the contents of the game disc and noticed the song believed its absence to be a last minute change or a glitch.

Reception[edit]

Critical reception
Review scores
Publication Score
IGN 8.0[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
DDRMAX2 Dance Dance Revolution
Dance Dance Revolution Extreme
2004
Succeeded by
Dance Dance Revolution Extreme 2