Dane Whitehouse

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Dane Whitehouse
Personal information
Full name Dane Whitehouse
Date of birth (1970-10-14) 14 October 1970 (age 44)
Place of birth Sheffield, England
Height 5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
Sheffield United
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1989–2000 Sheffield United 231 (38)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 19:43, 20 June 2010 (UTC).
† Appearances (Goals).

Dane Whitehouse (born 14 October 1970 in Sheffield) is an English former footballer who played in the Football League for Sheffield United.[1] Whitehouse was an accomplished left winger, who was equally comfortable filling in at left back. He served his only club, Sheffield United, for 13 years between 1987 and 2000, making 275 appearances and scoring 50 goals.

Club career[edit]

Whitehouse signed professionally for Sheffield United in July 1987 and was soon to make his first team debut against Blackpool in 1988, aged just 18. He made a good early impression, but was in and out of the team for most of his early professional career. He played a part in the Blades promotion from the Old Division Three in 1988, and again in the next season when United were promoted to the top flight. He began to establish himself as a regular during the 1991–92 season, when he became a regular fixture. His goals included a double against Chelsea in a 2-1 win, and he also chipped in with three FA Cup goals.

In the Steel City derby of the 1991–92 campaign, Whitehouse scored against local rivals Sheffield Wednesday in a 2-0 win at Bramall Lane. In the return fixture at Hillsborough, he was once again on target. with Whitehouse scoring the first goal.[citation needed]

After a game against Bristol City, Whitehouse broke his leg and missed a large proportion of the 1992–93 season. Despite the seriousness of the injury, he returned to play a part towards the end of the campaign. He starred in the closing stages of the Blades run to the FA Cup semi-final, making an appearance at Wembley Stadium in the defeat to Sheffield Wednesday. He was also on the score sheet twice in the final game of the season, when United hammered Chelsea 4-2.

Despite an opening day win over Swindon Town, United were again struggling to keep their Premiership status intact. In a 3-2 home win over West Ham United, Whitehouse smashed the ball into the top corner from nearly 30 yards for what was one of the goals of the season.[citation needed] Despite scoring several goals for United, United were relegated on the final game of the season, losing 3-2 away at Chelsea.

Whitehouse was again in good scoring form at the start of the 1994–95 season. He eventually finished with 10 goals in all competitions, which included a hat trick in the League Cup against Stockport County, but despite his goals the Blades failed to win promotion.

After a disappointing 1995–96 season United parted with longtime manager Dave Bassett. Howard Kendall took charge and despite a clear out of players, Whitehouse was still a first team regular in the new regime. He finished with six goals in the 1995–96 season, which included a goal against Arsenal at Highbury in the FA Cup. During the 1997–98 campaign, Whitehouse was a regular up to November. In a game against Port Vale he was crudely tackled by Gareth Ainsworth, and Whitehouse suffered a serious knee injury.[2] Despite an attempt to get back to fitness, which included a few outings for the reserves, Whitehouse was forced to retire.[citation needed]

Legacy[edit]

Whitehouse, a United fan from birth, was a crowd favourite who regularly makes many fans all time Blades 11. After United were relegated from the Premiership he attracted the attention of many clubs but remained loyal to United. He is often seen at matches, and will be forever remembered as one of the club's greatest ever players.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dane Whitehouse". Soccerbase. Centurycomm. Retrieved 24 January 2010. 
  2. ^ "Port Vale 0 Sheffield United 0". Sporting Life (London). 22 November 1997. Retrieved 19 December 2011.